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Yay for Babies!

Discussion in 'Chameleons' started by Loribeth, Jul 12, 2008.

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  1. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    A friend of ours is going to be having baby veiled chams! They should hatch within the month.... He said he'd get me one! I'm so excited! Any advice?
     
  2. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Yeah! Read the caresheet! Chams are some of the most touchy animals to keep. Start making its home now. :)
     
  3. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Yeah I read it and I'm researching online. But, I find as with any animal personal experience is good too. :)
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    And baby chams are even touchier than the adults!
     
  5. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Keep the baby in a smaller enclosure to begin with. They will find food and water easier. Also keep them well hydrated. Because of their low body mass they dehydrate quickly.
     
  6. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    How little should the enclosure be at the beginning? Hubby is gonna start building this week, so we will be ready. And do they eat crickets that little?
     
  7. fire2225ems

    fire2225ems Subscribed User Premium Member

    From the care sheet...

    Reptile feeders are readily available at most pet stores and online. For a good staple diet, you should vary the insects as much as possible. Some good ones to use are: crickets, silk worms, butter worms, and super worms. You can also give them the occasional wax worm, cockroach, or mealworm, but none of these are good for a staple diet. They are high in fat or hard to digest due to Chitin. (The hard exoskeleton of some feeders.)

    If you notice any discoloration on any of the feeders, or they look like they are not healthy, don't feed them to your Cham. It is better to be safe than sorry. (Avoid feeding insects that are caught outside. They may have pesticides on them and can be lethal to your Chameleon.)

    A good diet for a Chameleon 0-6 months would consist of approximately 10 insects daily that are proportionate to the size of the Chameleons head. These insects can be given in 2 feedings.

    Increase the size of the insect as your Chameleon grows. Around 6 months of age, you will want to cut back the number of feeders per day, to around 6.

    With a full-grown adult Veiled Chameleon, you can limit feedings to every other day.

    You can also offer vegetables to Veiled Chameleons, and the majority of them will eat them.

    They will also eat their plants, so you may want to provide them with something tasty, like hibiscus.
     
  8. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    I believe a 20 gal size would be fine. It seemed to work well for my young Veileds
     
  9. shannond81391

    shannond81391 Elite Member

    Get ready to get your fingers chewed at. Anytime you touch a baby, open mouth and strike. lol It doesn't hurt though. Chameleons are absolutely awesome. Congrats. I'm just saying, if your friend could hold them maybe for about 2 months. It would be a lot better, they have trouble adjusting, especially at that age, and a food source for newborns is a pain! Let me tell you, flightless fruit flies are the best for hatchlings. Pinheads will be too big if for under a month. 2-4 months eating nice and healthy are the best time to take them into your care. Good luck, hope all goes well.
     
  10. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Well, I believe he is keeping them for a short time. I am unsure of how long. I will ask him to for a month or 2. We are going out today after hubby gets home to get some supplies to start building the big enclosure. We found a small screened plastic cage type deal for the baby. It's not tiny but not huge. I think it's the perfect size. I cant wait to get him I'm so excited. They came over yesterday and said they held all the eggs to the light and there were viable moving baby chams in each and every one. That's such good news! Thanks for all the help.
     
  11. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Ok, he called me today about the lil hatchlings. They are moving and wiggling around! I can't wait! He said maybe 2 weeks before they start to arrive. YAY! I'm trying to get a cabinet of some sort to convert into a screened in enclosure. and he is keeping the babies for about a week or 2. He said that way I don't get one and it die the next day. I feel like I'm about to give birth any day, haha! Anyone else get this excited with their first cham?
     
  12. Siders

    Siders New Member

    Is he keeping the babies for a week or 2 after they have been born before he gives one to you?
     
  13. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Yeah, and he lives close by and said if any problems arise I can take him back. Or should I leave him there longer?
     
  14. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I would leave him there longer. 2 weeks really isn't very long and it will still be VERY small and fragile. Unless you are experienced at keeping baby chams I would leave THAT to the breeder. You might have to pay more but its worth it. You have a much better chance of the cham surviving.
    Personally I would go for at least 6 weeks!
     
  15. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Well the cham is free. I traded him a 6 foot burmese python. He likes snakes and I like chams :) It worked out well and I have never had a chameleon, but he doesn't know anything about them either. He is incubating them for a friend who didn't have one. He knows a lot about eggs and babies just not chams. He says that they are doing well and hes researched the topic and they are wiggling about and thriving. I've been here and at chameleonforums.com checking out baby care there as well. I made a little tiny cage out of a milk carton. I found the plans for that online. I think I can keep him alive as I've done a ton of work. I think I could talk him into keeping him longer. I think I have a better chance at his survival than he does. Any suggestions?
     
  16. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    If he has no experience with them you probably will give them more attention than he will.
     
  17. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Thats different.
    I thought that he was an experienced breeder!
     
  18. Loribeth

    Loribeth Active Member

    Thats why I'm getting one for free. He knows nothing. He's just hatching them in an incubator that his friend didnt have. Which I should see if I can get a few eggs from him and put them in a tuppy here. But I'll leave them be. Maybe I can get a few babies! Thats why I said I'l take one as soon as he's ready to let it go. Because if I'm having trouble I can come on here. Ya'll know a lot more than me and can help in any case that arises. Prepare for a lot of threads btw :)
     
  19. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    In that situation the baby may be better off in your hands after all!
     
  20. Siders

    Siders New Member

    Just make sure you keep us updated with pics, we love pics, and you keep a record for yourself of how often you mist how much you feed, how often shedding occurs and defecation etc. This will not only help you monitor the chams growth but also if the cham becomes ill then there is a written account of his upbringing for the vet to assess.

    Good luck and best wishes when you get your little one.

    Siders
     
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