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Tips For Helping A Leo Shed Toes?

Discussion in 'Leopard Geckos' started by Atroxus, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. Atroxus

    Atroxus Well-Known Member

    My gecko Kylo just shed the other day, but there is still a bit left on his toes. He had already lost the tips of several toes before I got him and I don't want him to lose anymore. His enclosure is runs 30-40% humidity. I put him in a warm shallow bath to let his toes soak and I was able to get most of the stuck shed off of his toes with a q-tip, but there is still a bit left on a couple toe tips. He was not a fan of bath time though.

    Anyone have any other suggestions? Or should I just try the bath and q-tip thing again?
     
  2. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, do you provide a moist hide?
     
  3. Atroxus

    Atroxus Well-Known Member

    Yes, his moist hide has lightly moistened coconut fiber substrate, which I spray lightly when it starts to look dry.
     
  4. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    After you soak the toes again you can use a paper towel and gently wipe or pull on his toes alittle bit (very gently). If that doesn't work and you can visibly see stuck shed matted up or hanging off, you can use tweezers to pull off alittle bit. Some may say that's too rough but it's better than the alternative. Maybe post a pic of your moist hide? Does the gecko use it often? The next step is probably to increase the moisture in the hide... (but you probably already guessed that).
    It might be too that the gecko is so used to having stuck shed on his toes that he doesn't give it the attention it deserves when shedding.
     
  5. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I would not recommend using tweezers to pull any skin off, you can try either baby oil/similar, apply once daily.
    I don`t believe the gecko isn`t giving it`s toes "the attention they need" when shedding (as in a conscious decision)!? ;)
     
  6. Atroxus

    Atroxus Well-Known Member

    I have never seen him use his moist hide, so I am not sure that increasing moisture there will help, but I can try it. He is always either under or on top of his hot hide. I will try soaking his toes again though and if that doesn't get the last of it, will try the baby oil idea as well.
     
  7. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    Shedding is definitely a conscious decision, next time I see a reptile shedding "unconsciously" I will let you know. It's called habituation, look it up. You can use oil first, but in any case the skin's gotta go.
     
  8. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    So in your opinion a reptile decides consciously to shed it`s skin, please explain in more detail... I take it we (Homo sapiens) also consciously decide to shed our skin and at times decide not to pay attention to some parts of our body?
    I`m definitely not "arguing", just very interested to learn more! ;)
     
  9. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    Geckos purposefully pull their skin off and eat it... you know this... so I don't understand where the confusion is. It's not like a human that walks around and is unaware of skin cells falling off, it's a process that starts with the gecko moistening it's skin and then actually physically pulling and rubbing the whole thing off... ? You can hardly call that subconscious... It's more akin to someone taking a shower... we feel dirty, therefore we bathe. It's a decision...
     
  10. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    I can't remember if we already established whether your temps are stable or not, but do you have the temps of what your moist hide area would be? Seems to me that he's choosing to be warm over being moist if he's not using his moist hide at all, so maybe move his moist hide over closer to the hotter side? Also when you get a chance it would be good for us to see it, just incase there is something about it that he isn't liking.
     
  11. Atroxus

    Atroxus Well-Known Member

    Second bath tonight, and with the help of a q-tip got the last of his stuck shed off. :)
     
    murrindindi and AmityReptiles like this.
  12. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member


    Shedding the skin in reptiles is a physiological process, certainly not cognitive as you suggest? Of course the gecko will deliberately "decide" to eat the skin for the nutrients it contains.
     
  13. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    The beginning stages may be physiological, up to the release of fluid under the skin and the loosening of it. But after that as already mentioned the "unsheathing" process can hardly be called subconscious. It takes physical effort and definitely some "cognitive" function. That's like saying getting a haircut is a physiological process, the subconscious part is the growth of hair, not the removal of it.
    If you didn't know how geckos shed why don't you just admit you were wrong instead of stubbornly sticking to a line of argument? Although if you don't fully comprehend the shedding process I don't see how that qualifies you to comment on a thread specifically about gecko shedding issues.
    My whole point was that a gecko that's lived it's whole life essentially wearing gloves, might possibly have a propensity for not properly unsheathing the hands. I don't see how that is an unreasonable statement, and I appreciate it when people show a little respect instead of criticising things they don't understand.
    Some of us are here to learn and help others, not to look for little syntax errors or figure out how we can make someone else look stupid, while making ourselves look smarter.
     
  14. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I am and was well aware of how geckos (and other reptiles) shed the skin..
    I do not EVER try and make other members "look stupid" or myself "smarter"?
    You comment on animals such as Varanids that you clearly have limited experience with on quite a regular basis, if I happen to disagree with something you`ve advised it`s purely for clarification (not out of disrespect) I will continue to do that. "Little syntax errors" might have a very detrimental effect on the animal...
     
  15. Atroxus

    Atroxus Well-Known Member

    Maybe you two should just agree to disagree. Until Leos become capable of telepathic communication, and/or we do, there isn't really any way to disprove either of your arguments.

    On one hand I can see some possibility to the argument that Kylo is just used to having stuck shed on his toes and has stopped trying to remove it as a result. This is supported by the fact that he was missing a few toe tips when I got him.

    Then again I also don't see him 24/7 so for all I know he does try, and his toes are just so difficult that he can't manage it on his own, and given that it took two soaking sessions to get the remains off this explanation seems equally valid.
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Ok I think that We are just dancing around different ways to say the same thing. The gecko doesn't just decide "hey...I think I will shed." What happens is a physiological change that results in the shed being ready to happen. This is not something that consciously happens. The resulting physical change results in the skin being itchy and the gecko does what it can to remedy the discomfort.
     
    AmityReptiles likes this.
  17. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    I never said "going into shed" wasn't a bodily function, for me "shedding" starts when the skin comes off... not before. The act of taking off the skin is definitely conscious, it is a purposeful act... I don't understand why my initial statement was needing to be picked on.
    for the record, I usually leave varanid specific posts to you, and when I do offer help (because I am an amateur varanid keeper) it's usually limited to very basic things I can feel confident in, or just asking the routine questions to help you and darkbird have an easier time of it.

    We may have differing opinions on things, and more experience with different animals, but we can certainly get along. And that starts with showing alittle mutual respect. Agreed?
    Honestly this is the dumbest debate and it really has no purpose.
     
  18. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Lol...if you think this is rough you should have been around forums in the old days. The forums, especially the iguana and monitor forums were flat out vicious!
    That was one of the reasons that Rich and I conceived of this site... so people could discuss things without having their heads bit off a made to feel like an idiot. We can be blunt and often passionate about discussions but nothing like it used to be.
    And we've worked hard to make sure it stays that way.
     
    Qwerty3159 likes this.

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