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Tiger Leg Monkey Tree

Discussion in 'Tree Frogs' started by kriminaal, Jul 17, 2005.

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  1. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Looking at setting up for these.I know nothing much so far.I always start with the food to see if I can easily obtain it.Babies I figure eat the small fruit flies.But what would the adults eat they aren't that small so they show eat a larger insect.Would it be crickets? :)
     
  2. kenman1963

    kenman1963 Moderator

    Crickets would be fine. Just make sure they are not wider than the frogs head. I would suggest getting info off the net or a book from your public library to learn as much as you can prior to purchase. It is important to make sure you can provide for every aspect of a pets life.
     
  3. Jay DeMore

    Jay DeMore Elite Member

    With any type of frog, the cleaner the setup the better. Make sure you are willing to clean the tank almost daily.
     
  4. CodyW

    CodyW Elite Member

    It would. Crickets would be the easiest to obtain. Tree frogs are usually ferocious and will probably consume any insect you put in there. Fruit flies and crickets shouldn't be too hard to come by. Any plans for the viv yet, I don't know much about tree frogs, do you need a 'rain chamber' for pylomedusas?
     
  5. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Tiger-legged monkey frogs are really cool. Monkey frogs are in a seperate genus from tree frogs, plus they have "thumbs" on their rear feet and amazing flexibility. They're also very poor jumpers, preferring to crawl rather than hop (though they're not incapable of it). There are several monkey frogs that go by the name tiger-legged, but the one most often seen in the pet industry is Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis ("P. azurea"). Other names include orange legged, tiger striped, etc. Phyllomedusa tomopterna can also be found, but I've never seen one myself.

    They only get 2 inches long as adults, and can be fed a diet primarily consisting of gutloaded crickets. Neonates will eat fruit flies and pinhead crickets. They can't swim too well, so a water dish no deeper than the frog is all you need. Use dechlorinated water, as for all herps. The tank must be heavily planted, and the typical amphibian substrates apply to these frogs. Bed-A-Beast, cypress mulch, etc are all good, but the best in my mind is pure, clean potting soil. You can pack it down so that it doesn't stick to the frogs so much too. Its been suggested that monkey frogs can benefit from UVB lighting, so I personally use one for mine, and I recommend you do the same. Temperatures of 80-70 degrees are just fine for monket frogs, and a moderate humidity level, around 50-70% is fine. They're not from very humid forests, but will tolerate higher humidity. Better to have too much than too little when applied to amphibians. A 10 gallon will house one frog, and a 20 tall will house about 3, for they're fairly active frogs. Be sure to use a screen lid.

    Here's my tigerleg, Crikket. He's a Phyllomedusa hypochondrialis ;)

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  6. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Thanks for the responses.I am a firm believer in preparation first,acquisition second.Just beginning to research them and there aren't many good caresheets.I'll probably be picking Matts brain in the near future if I decide to add one to my collection.
     
  7. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    lol, well fortunately, they seem to be pretty hardy species. As Jay said, the biggest issue is probably making sure the tank is clean, but that's true for any amphib.
     
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