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Question On How Much One Can Handle A Brb As A Pet

Discussion in 'Rainbow Boas' started by floatindownsligo, Jan 27, 2016.

  1. floatindownsligo

    floatindownsligo New Member

    I am new to this site, and somewhat new to the reptile world, and have experience with Ball Pythons on and off since I was young and have always loved snakes ( I even got lucky enough for both of the times I got bit by a rattlesnake [both medium adults] gave me almost completely dry bites and didn't hurt at all at any point- both times I literally ran right over them as I am a long distance runner) and am trying to decide to either get a Ball Python or a Rainbow Boa.

    I've lived with several Ball Pythons and almost every one- if it wasn't cold in the house, would cuddle with them and read with them watching over my shoulder! :D I love snakes so very much. So in that regard, if any question of mine is a no-brainer for the learned and aged reptile owner/breeder, I hope everyone knows that I am only trying to look to provide the best possible environment for my snake, since I will be getting either snake when they are less than a month old to be able to form a stronger bond.

    Since I personally know from experience, that ball pythons not only can be handled almost all the time (OBVIOUSLY EXCEPT 1-3 DAYS AFTER FEEDING OR OBV IF THEY GIVE ANY SIGNS OF WANTING TO BE ALONE. I AM A HERMIT, SO I CAN COMPLETELY UNDERSTAND THEM; ONE OF THE MANY REASONS I LOVE SNAKES SO VERY MUCH. JUST TO CLARIFY.)

    I was REALLY hoping for anybody who has had FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE to let me know how long it would be safe for the snake to be out of his/her cage without having to worry about it developing any health problems from lack of humidity from being handled outside the enclosure. The enclosure will be perfect for keeping in humidity, will be freezing cypress or aspen mulch and then letting sit out until thawed and warm, as I heard that is a good way to prevent mites being introduced to their enclosure and thus the snake via their bedding or whatever the case may be.

    So, PLEASE, TO ALL THOSE READING THIS WHO HAVE A BRB I couldn't tell you how much of a help and reassurance it would be for me, because I WILL NEVER and have never adopted or bought an animal if I didn't have enough money for food, a generator in the very rare case the power goes out, and have a very clean house.


    If it seems as though BRB's would not be the best fit, please explain to me with at least a modicum of detail. I can't thank anybody who is still reading this enough! Truly, thank you! I hope very much to hear from someone soon!

    Wishing everybody the best and hope that all is well!
    Thank you! :D
     
  2. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, length of time outside the enclosure will depend to a large extent on the conditions in the room, so what are they?
     
  3. floatindownsligo

    floatindownsligo New Member

    A warm average 70-75 degree house with carpeting. I'm used to having ball pythons just hang on around my neck or arm and cuddle with me that way if I go sit down to read a book. The air is fairly dry at around 30-40 percent ; no more so than the average house, unless one lives back east or in other specialized climates ie Florida, Louisiana, etc.

    My number one concern would always be for the safety and well being of the snake. I know how to check to see if a snake is having difficulties shedding, or might be too cold or overheated. The real question is, would it be the best for the animal; it would be wrapped around me, and while I don't possess the most moisture, I could easily have a spray bottle around when I am handling and hanging out with the snake.

    Thank you for your response and help, it is greatly appreciated.
     
  4. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Thanks for the details, you`ve answered your own question; the house conditions do NOT support the snake, except for the bare minimum of time (several MINUTES). They lose heat very quickly, I suspect the reason they sit quietly around your body is because they are cooling down and become sluggish.
    Without any doubt it`s a real threat to their health even if it doesn`t seem obvious if it`s done on a regular basis.
     
  5. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    In terms of temperament, a BRB can be a bit of a crap shoot - some are great, some are nasty, and some are quite bipolar.

    They require high humidity in their enclosure at almost all times (I allow periodic drying to keep mold under control). While I would be reluctant to expose them to arid climates long term, as long as temps are good, they will be fine in dryer 'outside the tank' environs for an hour or two at a time.

    I would advise against extended handling in less than optimal temperatures. (anything under 70ºF or above 95ºF should be limited to short sessions.)

    Heat is definitely the biggest issue. I do not bring my snakes outside of my warm, humid reptile room at all this time of year, unless there is a need for it. My house temperature is around 50ºF, and the snake's temperature would drop like a stone in minutes.

    Another thing to consider is that Ball Pythons are bump-on-a-log snakes. By comparison, my BRB is a race car driver - she doesn't hold still while she is out, and requires much more constant attention to keep her safe. They aren't the kind of snake you can drape and forget about.

    That said, BRBs regularly survive being taken to trade shows, and shipped across the country, so they CAN tolerate it, but doing so with any regularity will put the animal under stress, which in the long term can lead to health problems.
     
  6. floatindownsligo

    floatindownsligo New Member

    Thank you for your help and time; it is greatly appreciated.
    I will definitely be adopting a Ball Python instead, as I would like to spend more than 1-2 hours at a time with them, as I am first and foremost looking for a pet/friend.
    I do however plan on building large enclosures and breed Rainbows in a year or so after I have done much more research, meet in person with established breeders, etc. The health and happiness of any animal is the most paramount thing to me personally. I only plan on housing 10-12 adults, and have an enormous space available. So eventually I will be able to interact with these beautiful creatures on a daily basis- if only for a few minutes a day: whatever is best for them. I could imagine taking them out repeatedly 1-2 hours everyday would have a similar detrimental effect.

    Thank you again, I hope that all is well and I wish you the very best!
     

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