This Disappears When Logged In

Question Anout Closet Enclosure

Discussion in 'Green Iguanas' started by Zachwood, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Zachwood

    Zachwood Member

    Well me and my daughter are turning her spare closet into a reptile enclosure we r getting a cuban rock iguana within the next month or so but was curious if i could get a few pointers from people who r more experienced with this situation i am going to put kennel seal on walls and floor also going to put repti carpet down just dont know how to go about putting a door on will screen mesh work for front i need help please wat should i do any tips or pointers thank you so much
     
  2. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, just a couple of points for now; unless your house closely resembles the wild climate they originate from, I advise the enclosure has a solid (glass) front, screen will make it almost impossible to stabilise the conditions inside.
    Reptile carpet is horrible, much more effective would be a particulate substrate (which is what they usually live on)!
    How big is the space you have available for the enclosure?
     
    TamJam likes this.
  3. Zachwood

    Zachwood Member

    Well i know the space is about 8 ft tall 7ft wide and 3.5 feet deep at least i am at work right now dont have exact measurements so suggestions i am so up for any help to make this enclosure a good home for our guy once we get him please and thank u so much again
     
  4. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Definitely a +1 here for a glass door over the screen door. It's just so much easier to control ambient heat and humidity.
    It's no fun cleaning feces out of reptile carpet.
     
  5. iRene

    iRene Elite Member

    Is there room to install a shower type door? I have seen people tile closets and add a short wall seveal inches high in order to use particle subatrates.
     
  6. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    I would do at least a 12" solid section at the bottom, preferably closer to 18", for a substrate barrier. You will need glass, mesh of any type will not be an option if you want to keep the animal healthy. Is would also suggest swing doors over sliders, as lizards tend to kick substrate into the tracks of sliders, usually making the doors hard to operate or jamming them altogether.
     
  7. Zachwood

    Zachwood Member

    Wow thank u all so much for the info and suggestions i want my iggy to b the best taken care of i can provide
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I am not a fan of particulate substrates for iguanas. Since they tongue flick everything the risk of impaction is too high. I prefer a simple tile floor, since they will usually be up in the habitat as opposed to a terrestrial animal that stays on the ground.
    It also aids in cleanup. An adult iguana will put out some serious waste.
     
  9. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    I was under the impression that Cuban rock iguanas spent more time on the ground, is this incorrect? And i was recommending a particulate substrate because having that layer at the bottom of the cage is a huge aid in maintaining stable humidity in a cage. Never had an impaction issuewith an animal yet, but I haven't kept iguanas of any type in a long time.
     
    murrindindi likes this.
  10. Zachwood

    Zachwood Member

    Thanks i am so appreciative for the info taking all of this in i have decided to purchase a enclosure in stead of use closet to many factors i would worry about but this enclosure is beautiful will b showing pics soon nice portable solid room enclosure 7ft by 6ft 5ft with glass doors in front that slide on tracks inside is a smaller square type tileing easy for clean up and has 2 nice basking shelfs one miway up and one up top
     
  11. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, as always it`s the keepers choice regarding the internal setup, but I will say that depriving the lizard of a more "natural" substrate is mostly about the keeper, if they are properly supported the risk of them becoming impacted is absolutely minimal, otherwise they would have become extinct in the wild, as opposed to them actually flourishing there.
    Just because some things have been done a certain way for many years by a good number of people doesn`t necessarily make it what`s best (no disrespect to anyone). Particulate substrates work extremely well, particularly for lizards which spend much of their time on the ground.
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Oops. Missed that it was a cyclura. But it will still use the verticle space.
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    the same can be said about naturalistic enclosures. They are more for the esthetics of the keeper. It is not depriving the animal of anything. Animals in the wild move over all sorts of surfaces. Grass, sand, rock, wood, even sidewalks. There is absolutely nothing wrong with using artificial substrates. And the reason that something is recommended is due to the fact that it has proven successful over time.
    And how do we know that an animal in the wild does not become impacted?
    And even if we assuming that it is uncommon, that would be of little comfort to the keeper who had the one that died.
     
  14. Zachwood

    Zachwood Member

    I am so excited and ready gor my iggy a few more days and he will be with his new fam cant wait to use all this knowledge and advice thank u again
     
  15. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    Most of our animals, especially the lizards, will use as much space as we can give them. Actually had this conversation with a customer at the local reptile show last weekend, they were worried about placing an animal in too large a cage. I just gave them some advice about cluttering up the cage to give the animal more cover so it will feel safer. Hope to hear back from them at the next show.
     

Share This Page