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Please help this gecko!

Discussion in 'Geckos - Other' started by robyn, Jun 1, 2005.

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  1. deltro_star

    deltro_star Elite Member

    Its still best to keep her In a warm,humid, planted enclosure like FS said to keep her comfortable and help her adjust and spray her daily, a lot of arboreal herps drink water droplets off of nearby plants.
     
  2. robyn

    robyn Member

    She doesn't like to be sprayed. At all. Goes insane when I do it. I don't have any plants in there (not my lizards, I got them as is) for her to drink off of, so I try to get the tank walls really good. I'm bringing them in tomorrow to see a guy who is Knowledgable in all Things Lizard to get some extensive help.
     
  3. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    You know what, I think you're right. She does look an aweful lot like a sandstone gecko. Sandstone's and goldens are different species, but look very much alike. While the golden is Gekko ulikovskii, the sandstone gecko is Gekko petricolus. The major external difference is that goldens are usually banded, and sandstones are usually mottled, like yours. Sandstones also go by the name gold-rush gecko. They're native to southeast asia, like Thailand and Cambodia. They also prefer a well forested enclosure, with moderately high humidity. Care isn't much different from that of the goldie really.
     
  4. robyn

    robyn Member

    I brought Spunk in for evaluating and my boss (it's a pet store, remember) kindly let me leave him there for the weekend in his own tank with a water dish. I have never before or since seen this gecko drink. Or move much. And he took a big mouthful of sand trying to run away, but they rinsed him out *phew* The original owner is going shopping very very soon for everything I need. I'm making then a list. And so I guess he's a sandstone, then? And yes, it's male, d'oh!
     
  5. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Yeah, I'd say sandstone. The enclosure should be setup like most lizards from his habitat. Anoles, golden geckos, and tokays are good examples of similar habitat requirements.
     
  6. robyn

    robyn Member

    Alright, thanks a lot. Now I just have to convince the owner not to buy the moss sub for it...
     
  7. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Moss will be ok (MUCH better than the sand), but there are much better ones out there. Bed-A-Beast, cypress mulch, and orchid bark are better, but my favorite natural substrate is soil. You can get pure, unchemicalized, clean potting soil pretty cheap at garden stores. Other substrates that can be used are paper towels or reptile carpet if you want to go that route.
     
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