This Disappears When Logged In

Newbie Questions

Discussion in 'Leopard Geckos' started by luvcamerasnic, Nov 28, 2017.

  1. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    We have just gotten our gecko and I thought I had done my research but now I'm paranoid because he's not moving around much or eating for a couple of days. While this pet is my daughter's, I will be ensuring proper care and will be the one buying food.

    The gecko came from the breeder with about 10 meal worms, which he (we think, not quite big enough to tell yet) ate that night. We also purchase some crickets, which we dusted, and he ate 4 or 5 (I forget) the first night. He would not eat yesterday or yet today, offering just crickets.

    I don't have any more meal worms here, but could get some tomorrow if that's needed. We have a bunch of crickets so I'd like to use them but he's not a big fan of them in his habitat so I keep removing them after giving him a chance to eat. His poop is solid and has the white bits. He has pooped every day since she got him.

    He's not coming out of the hide much at all. I read that is normal as they adjust to the new habitat.

    He was hatched in August the breeder said. I thought that made him young so he would need to eat daily?

    Temps are between 80-90 on the hot side, but I need a better thermometer I think. He's in a 10 gallon tank with the dumb carpet it came with as the substrate. When I put the thermometer on the ground it goes to the 90 mark. He has the lamps that came in the kit, a screen lid (I read that I might need a different lid to keep heat in) and an under-tank heater. In order to keep the tank nearer the 90 side, I need to put on both the night and day lamps during the day because our house is cold.

    She's anxious to hold him, and I'm anxious to get him accustomed to us. Any tried and true tips? Is it ok that he's not eating these two days? How long do we give him to adjust before we start trying to hold him?

    Attached is his picture. He's not as blue as the picture seems to show more of a purple.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    Skipping two days of food is not a big deal for any reptile, he may have overeaten, or it might just be the stress from a brand new environment. The time period before handling is to give him time to relax and get accustomed to his new environment, so he may be stressed and not eat regularly at first. What size crickets/mealworms are you feeding?
    Opinions on adjustment periods vary, personally I wait a minimum of a week, and maybe longer if they are showing signs of stress.
    He looks to be a very healthy weight. I would just give him more time. I'm assuming you have good cover and hides? Some pictures of the enclosure may help.
     
  3. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

     
  4. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    Sorry the reply buto wad not working yesterday. Thankfully he started eating and exploring so I think we are ok! I will get s pic of the setup tomorrow.

    Question. I think the temp is too high. Got a digital thermometer and it is saying 95 on the hot side floor. That is with overhead and under tank heaters. Tonight I unplugged the under tank heater to cool down and left the nighttime red light on. Any better solutions?
     
  5. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    An undertank heater must be regulated with a thermostat for safety reasons. This will also solve your heat issue.
     
  6. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

  7. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    Here are pics of the messy habitat. The white stuff is from the cricket dust. We are cleaning it a bit today. Got tracked all over. 20171202_090905.jpg 20171202_090856.jpg
     
  8. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    I also added a moist hide on cool side this morning - tupperware with hole, melted edges for safety, and wet paper towels until I can get some moss. I moved the plastic cave and that is where the moist hide is. Tank feels a bit crowded.
     
  9. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    It would be fine. That's the thermostat I use. It comes with a probe that you simply have to attach to the tank floor above the heat pad.
     
    luvcamerasnic likes this.
  10. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    Ok so - do I really need the heat lamps? THe thermostat will come monday but for now I'm just watching manually (I work from home so I can do this) - Keeps getting too hot with both the UTH and the heat lamp on. Is there anoterh kind of lamp/bulb to use for light only?
     
  11. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    I don't use a lamp for my gecko. His heat is supplied through a UTH and during the day he gets light from the windows as well as a table lamp. A light directly on top of the enclosure might ne too much light and heat wise anyway
     
    AmityReptiles likes this.
  12. iRene

    iRene Elite Member

    95F for a floor surface temp is not a problem if there is a cooler place. My very first gecko had a variety from about 103F to 65F and he would often use the 103F warmth. The thermostat will allow you to maintain a specific temperature without going over. My 103F spot was set to turn off if it hit 105F.

    Even younger geckos will skip feedings. My youngest skipped four days in a row. Last night he ate like a champ. Some days they just don't feel like eating and refuse.

    I honestly feel that a 10 gallon tank is awfully small for a leo. I recently took in an adult female that was in a 10. I put her into a 29 gallon that is turned on its side for more floor space. It is 3 times the size she had and she is utilizing all of the space. A larger space will give more room to create the temperature variation the animal needs. I even have my 3 month gecko in a 29. Covering the sides and back of the tank with dark paper can help a gecko feel more secure and spend more time outside the hides.
     
  13. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    If this is a leopard gecko they don't require alot of lighting, only what you need for viewing purposes. Just alittle ambient light during the day is enough for them to have good sleep cycles. Actually too much light can be a stress to them.
     
  14. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    Yes, leopard gecko.
     
  15. Owen Baranoski

    Owen Baranoski Well-Known Member

    I use a UVB fixture, which doesn't provide heat. I use a heating mat, which is the important part. They need heat, but the light is not necessary.
     
  16. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    Thank you for all of the insight. I am planning to upgrade the tank soon to a 20 gallon. He has been much more active, but I have a new question. Now he is showing signs of shedding. He's turned white-ish on his body (not head) and has finally spent some time in the moist hide. However, we noticed the white coloring last night, and today it's still the same (so 12 hours) - when and how do I know if I need to do something else to help him shed, or is he still good to handle this on his own? He's still pretty shy of being handled so trying to put him in a bath would be extremely stressful.
     
  17. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    You never need to do anything to help them shed, it's a very basic function for them and shouldn't be interfered with. sometimes it takes a while for them to shed, sometimes it doesn't. The only thing to watch out for is if they start to get stuck shed and they don't pull it off for a long while, (usually on the toes of the feet) it can build up and cut off circulation to an area. But if you have a humid hide that shouldn't happen. Just make sure before the next shed, that all the skin from this shed has come off.
     
  18. luvcamerasnic

    luvcamerasnic Member

    ok thanks! I had corn snakes once and one of them had a problem and she had to have baths with shed eeze or wouldn't shed.
     

Share This Page