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New Owner in Need of Help

Discussion in 'Bearded Dragons' started by z3r0jimmy, Jun 3, 2013.

  1. Warhawk

    Warhawk Well-Known Member

    I"M NO EXPERT ON THESE....It sounds to me like you have a heat problem. When we got ours he did the same sort of thing wasn't eating well and just sit around. After 2 days we went and got a laser Thermometer to measure the temp of his basking spot. It was on the low side 92-95 so we fixed that and he eats like crazy now
     
  2. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    I think the most important thing to remember is that there is no one right way of doing things, for any reptile. In the case of disputes, I always advise that you listen to both sides, but go out and do your own research. Caresheets are a great place to start, but remember that even those can differ greatly from one another depending on the species. That's because they're often tailored toward what works for the writer's situation, and not necessarily what will work for every animal. As well, even different animals of the same species are different, and what is generally advised doesn't necessarily work for yours.

    I have one species of gecko for example who is healthy and thriving...and her basking temps are about 95-96F, which is higher than the range suggested for this species. However, she goes off food if her temps are any lower. Would I advise other owners to keep their geckos at this temp? No. But I would bring it up as a point of consideration if others are having issues with feeding with their geckos. I adjusted my temps, after starting with the advised guideline, because I found these worked better for her.

    Some bearded dragons will drink from standing water, and some won't. Considering the vast majority of their hydration comes from their food (if fed appropriately, of course) and many will drink while in their bath, they need very little (if any) in the way of available water in their enclosure. I would say if you opt to have water available 24/7, to ensure you do so in a very small, shallow bowl. This will mitigate the risk of drowning and keep your humidity within the appropriate range, as well as consuming very little floor space. If you choose not to, just ensure you provide your dragon with sufficient hydration through other means (diet, misting, baths, etc.). Either way, the choice is yours.
     
  3. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    you are quite right cassi, your points are all very true. The only other thing I would is there is no need or sense to be rude, sarcastic or troll other people who do not agree with your side. We are all here to learn and care of our pets better. Not to cause petty drama.
     
  4. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    thanks may but there really isn't a sitter my fiance and i live together and we both take care of the baby. with that said, here's an update, her colors have become more vibrant and the head tremors have gone down to a near minimum, only comes when there's a huge sudden movement like i have to move her out of the way to clean her tank up (it was left to right not up and down and was like you were shaking in cold weather). the new problem is her eating....according to my fiance cause she fed him the last two mornings the baby went after her meals and put on a sticky note how many crickets she put in (they were dusted and had meals with vitamins and minerals overnight) and when i checked there was only 1 cricket left. afterwords she doesn't wanna eat anymore and i try to make her eat some zoomed juvenile food mixed with collard greens (which smells amazing..really it does!) but she just looks away or stares at it and i have to push it on the side of her mouth till she opens and eats it. i've been trying to follow everyone's advice as close as possible (getting a 40g tank next week with reptisun 10) and i'm really thankful to everyone's advice and any more guidance would help so much. the last thing i wanna see is a repeat of what happened to my boa cause it wasn't the brightest bulb in the box and didn't kill its prey before eating it
     
  5. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    thanks and as i mentioned before i use a laser thermometer as well for it's basking spot and it's always between 105ºF -110ºF so i'm not sure if heating issue is not a problem
     
  6. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    Truly z3 I don't believe heat is the culprit, I more suspect stress and/or parasites honestly. Stress can he solved by moving her into a bigger cage and allowing her to adapt to her surroundings and parasites sound scary but in all honesty its just like parasites in other animals it just doesn't take as long to run them down as larger animals.

    Just remember to keep offering food, keep it 80% insect / 20% salad (and even if she doesnt eat the salad don't be surprised - it takes time) and mist her a few times a day to keep her moisture up. And with parasites many vets that don't normally treat reptiles will do a fecal for you because parasites in lizards look the exact same as they do in dogs and cats.

    Finally, I am sorry for the slight issue the other day, please accept my apology and welcome we hope you choose to stay with the forums!Glad you're here.
     
  7. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    i didn't find any issue at all i ultimately kept the water dish cause she does use it but sometimes i have to push her to it and i looked at the stores tanks and they use 10g enclosures as well oddly enough i think though it may be humidity cause i just looked and it's a 30% that's way to high!
     
  8. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    this was just taken about 2 minutes ago and this is where she sits most of the day and this is pretty much the average temp of that spot IMG_0889.jpg
     
  9. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    I would agree with TigerIvy on getting a fecal done for your dragon. Unfortunately, many reptiles (whether CB or WC) purchased at pet stores do carry a parasite load, which, while not posing a problem while at the store, can become problematic once the reptile is rehomed and the stress of the relocation causes the parasites to multiply. Most vets can do a fecal without seeing your animal, and it's a quite inexpensive test to give you peace of mind. I would call around and find a vet who can do the test, and get one in as soon as you're able. If parasites are the issue, even top notch husbandry and care won't amount to much if they're already at the point of becoming unmanageable.

    Reptile Vet Finder

    Once you're able to rule out parasites, it will be much easier to diagnose feeding/thriving problems.
     
  10. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    Z3 that is actually a good temp. Honestly it is. I see her shedding is coming along nicely too :) I will tell you from experience some of my dragons wont eat when they shed, where others will. And I have 1 that wont eat anything but salads when they are shedding (go figure).

    And pet stores often times have no idea what they are doing and keep pets in the cheapest way possible, not is what is best for the animal. Its sad but true.

    And hun, she is your dragon you do what you believe is honestly best for her :) cassi is right you read and decide what to do. I know I for one wont get angry if someone doesn't take my advice. Ok well unless its like the its like a totally critical emergency, animal needs to be seen at a vet and the owner wants to give them tylenol. LOL then I would be mad. I only try to help with the years of knowledge I have with them, what my general experience with them has been.

    ^ +1 to what cassi said
     
  11. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    i actually found a vet nearby that isn't listed in the Nevada listing that does work on exotics and reptiles here the ones listed are all they way in the south part of las vegas
     
  12. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    If you've had/have a good experience with this vet, you should submit the information to Rich to be included in the VetFinder on this site. It's a great resource and is in part due to the information contributed by the members.
     
  13. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    i'm not sure about the herp part of their services but i was recommended to go by 2 pet stores......petsmart and a exotic pet store and i've brought my kitten there as well before so i know they're good with common pets and i've seen the care they put into avian species and ferrets
     
  14. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Luckily, fecal exams are fairly straight-forward (many keepers, once their collections are large enough to warrant it, will even perform fecals at home themselves), so as long as the vet and/or technicians have a basic knowledge of parasites in reptiles, they should have no problems identifying them if they exist. These exams usually/should consist of a fecal smear and a float (one to check for active parasites, one to check for eggs) which will allow them to positively determine most types of parasites.
     
  15. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    Its honestly true, parasites tests are not expensive at all. I mean truthfully it only costs them a few bucks for the float kit and slide.

    And please give the vet information to Rich! We always need more vets listed.
     
  16. Warhawk

    Warhawk Well-Known Member


    Sorry must have missed that.
     
  17. z3r0jimmy

    z3r0jimmy Elite Member

    so i have to collect her fecal samples? i thought they would just as any other animal.... by the way i have a video of what it's head shakes were but this was from june 1st this was as bad as it got it's on youtube [video=youtube;0cC0KmDgF1Q]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cC0KmDgF1Q&feature=*********[/video]
     
  18. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    z3 is she still shaking her head like that? I am curious because I can think of several different things that cause that. The first is nutrition. calcium deficiency is something we often hear about in reptiles but what people often fail to realize is the chain on vitamins and minerals needed for the body to metabolize other vitamins and minerals.

    For example: The correct ratio of calcium to phosphorus should be at least 1:1, preferably 2:1
    Calcium, D3 and phosphorus are essential to calcium absorption

    Ok this being said...if your dragon is not getting enough D3 in their diet either by natural or synthetic means then the body cant use the calcium and you have a vitamin deficient dragon.

    In my experience is it best to not depend upon supplements alone (NOTE I am not saying they are bad). Supplements are exactly that - they supplement nutrition the animal should be getting naturally. Example - I use Spaghetti Squash as a staple because of its high calcium content. BUT in doing this I am lacking D3 and phosphorus. I can use Zucchini or a little banana to supplement the phosphorus levels. D3 is an issue though, you said you are using a formula that does not contain D3. D3 can be obtained from natural sunlight or full spectrum UV bulbs (most of those curly Q bulbs are not full spectrum btw). Here is an example of a full spectrum light Arcadia D3+ Reptile Lamp 18" *Fits all regular 18" fluorescent fixtures* SALE!!.

    Bottom line? Without D3 of some type - no amount of calcium or phosphorus will save your dragon.

    As for fecal, just wait til she takes a poo and try to scrape it up (suggestion? washed and sanitized plastic spoon works well) put in a clean container take it to the vet.
     
  19. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Just a note on collecting a fecal sample - store it in the fridge if you can't get to the vet right away. This will prevent it from degrading beyond the point of providing a viable result. Usually, you have up to 24 hours after the sample to get it in, but it depends entirely on the vet. I have one vet that won't accept a sample older than 2 hours, another older than 4, and another older than 12. It wouldn't hurt to call in to ask what they would prefer.
     
  20. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    LOL good point cassi, I do mine here so I don't think about that stuff. If I can catch them pooping I can test pretty immediately.
     

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