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New Coastal Carpet, Defensive In Cage.

Discussion in 'Carpet/Diamond Pythons' started by bucher70, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. bucher70

    bucher70 Elite Member

    Hello. Haven't been on here in a while. I recently acquired a sub adult coastal carpet. She is quite beautiful, and great once out of her enclosure. Ate twice for me, and displays what I consider normal behavior in her enclosure. ( Thermoregulating, uses her shelves to perch on, ect).

    I know young carpets tend to be defensive, which is fine. My concern is that I don't want to make it a bad experience every time I try to take her out of her enclosure. She bites, hisses, all signs of stress/ fear in my opinion. My thought is hook training her to minimize this, but I think this will be difficult as she tends to wrap around her perch, making it a big ordeal to unwrap her, causing more stress.

    Thanks for reading.
     
  2. mshrmheadcharge

    mshrmheadcharge Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    Are you coming into her enclosure from above? If so it may make her feel threatened. Perhaps a front-opening enclosure will be more appropriate?
    How long have you had her, could she still be adjusting to her new home? It is recommended that you leave the snake alone in the enclosure for a week or two with no handling so she can familiarize herself with her new environment. This period is vital to the snakes well being and may be all she needs to feel more comfortable.
     
    TJOHNSON722 likes this.
  3. bucher70

    bucher70 Elite Member

    Ive had her for a little over two weeks, pretty much left her alone until recently other than cage maintenance. It is a front opening enclosure also.
    I cant help but wonder if its not food motivated. Ive been handling her with gloves and long sleeves, which helped a whole lot, but as soon as I removed one glove she latched on to my hand and constricted. Ha! Wonder if its my heat signature
     
  4. mshrmheadcharge

    mshrmheadcharge Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    How large is she and what size prey do yo have her on right now? It may be time to go up a feeder size if you believe it is food related. A quick note- feeding in the enclosure doesn't typically cause aggression, so I wouldn't worry about that.
     
    TJOHNSON722 likes this.
  5. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The bite and constrict is a feeding response. The snake is hungry.
    An aggressive bite would be hit and release.
     
  6. bucher70

    bucher70 Elite Member

    Shes a sub-adult so approximately 4 ft, but slender. I wouldn't say under weight, she has good muscle mass. Shes been eating medium rats a bit wider than her own girth, so I believe the size is appropriate. I just fed her again last night, with the thought that she was indeed hungry, which would be four days from her last feeding. I guess we will see what that does.

    Oh and no worries about feeding in the enclosure, I never believed that nonsense. I have six snakes that all eat in their enclosures and she is the only bitey one. Time will tell.
     
  7. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    IMO, It could be a few things. It could be that she just has one of those attitudes. I have certainly seen it in the past. Another idea is that she may need a little longer to adjust to any changes. Especially if you have other mammal animals, noisy people (aka young kids), noisy/high traffic room that she is in, etc. I have also seen that. Last idea is that the people who you acquired her from didnt handle her much if at all. She could just not be used to it.

    As long as she is eating (seems like she has a very healthy appetite), is thermoregulating, perching and all that other normal snake behavior I wouldn't worry about it too much.
     
  8. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    My jungle/cross carpet python (baby pic avatar) is as gentle as any snake, has never struck or bitten. The new baby IJ jag sibling (smaller than the first one was when we brought him/her home) has quite the attitude though. Strikes at anything that moves near, though isn't a problem once she's (pink highlighter mark on the back, seller wasn't the breeder, so I presume female) actually out of the tank. I suspect the attitude will cool down with time and patience.
     
  9. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    I think so too. Just give it time and patience. She should do alot better. Good luck with her and keep us updated.
     
  10. bucher70

    bucher70 Elite Member

    She has calmed significantly, although still defensive in the cage, which I can deal with. It his her safe place after all. Ive gotten her used to being removed from the enclosure with a hook and she tolerates that quite well. The downside is Shortly after her initial post, I noticed she had mites. First time for me, and hopefully the last.
    I seem to have gotten the mites under control, which I'm sure was contributing to her agitation.
    Thanks for the advice.
     
  11. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    My new one has been hiding in her cave for over a week now, Looks like she's going to shed, just taking a while. I've been really lucky so far, 19 snakes and none with mites. Many years ago (before the internet) I had a baby burmese python that had mites. Recommended treatment was to put a small piece of a Shell No Pest Strip under the newspaper in the enclosure to kill the mites. Not being a fan of chemicals, I used Crisco shortening. Simply coated the snake with it, and placed in a 10 gallon tank for a couple days. The Crisco coated the mites and suffocated them, no harm to the snake, and a warm bath with dish detergent cleaned the shortening off the snake's skin. These days there are several products available specifically to kill mites, but I see no reason why they would be a better option, lol.
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    That is advice that is more 20 years out of date. The pest strips contain chemicals that have been determined to cause neurological damage in snakes. DO NOT USE THEM!
     
  13. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    Even back then it seemed like a bad idea, that's why I opted for the Crisco. Current options are Provent-a-mite or Nix, with Nix being more widely available since it's actually intended to treat head lice on people, but works on reptile mites as well.
     
  14. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Actually there is another. It's called Reptile Spray (formerly Reptile Relief)from Natural Chemistry. Its safe and quite effective.
     

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