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Nan, Thailand: Thai-Lao Border Frontier

Discussion in 'Field Herping' started by Michael_C, Mar 27, 2007.

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  1. Michael_C

    Michael_C Elite Member

    It has been a long time since posting here. Here are some pictures from a herpetological survey conducted from 2 to 21 March.

    Lycodon fasciatus, a snake not pictured often at all. Of all my references, I had one picture of this species in a book written over 40 years ago.
    [​IMG]

    Calotes emma alticristatus, northern subspecies of the nominate form.
    [​IMG]

    A gravid female Sinonatrix percarinata found at 900m in elevation.
    [​IMG]

    A small male Popeia popeiorum found at over 1200m in elevation on the highest peak of Khun Nan National Park.
    [​IMG]

    Maybe some more later.

    Cheers,
    Michael
     
  2. MoogleBass

    MoogleBass Kittes are so nice! Premium Member

    Awesome pics. The last snake looks awesome. looks a bit mean too lol. The lizard or what ever it is is awesome too.
     
  3. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Long time no post Michael :). The pics are fantastic, love the colors of some of them. Cant wait to see more.
     
  4. CodyW

    CodyW Elite Member

    Sweet shots Michael! Really like the last pose.
     
  5. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Wow, I think you beat me, lol. They're all gorgeous!
     
  6. Moshpitrockchick

    Moshpitrockchick Subscribed User Premium Member

    Great shots Michael, I think you like to make us jealous!
     
  7. Colleen

    Colleen Elite Member

    Nice pictures, thanks for sharing.
     
  8. JMM

    JMM Elite Member

    Fantastic pics Michael !

    The popeia is absolutely beautiful (not to mention the pose..)
     
  9. Michael_C

    Michael_C Elite Member

    Thank you for the nice comments. The last picture from the last post was a bit mean- Pope's Pit Viper. When captured, it bit at everything: the snake tongs, the dirt and even bit itself.

    Furryscaly, your avatar is from my area over here, but from that angle, it is difficult to tell if it is a Ahaetulla prasina or Ahaetulla nasuta ? Ahaetulla nasuta actually lives right where I live- just have not had one come inside the yard yet, but have seen many. I don't have any pictures uploaded of them, but I will post some from out in the field in the future.

    Here are a couple of amphibian pictures:

    The most common species found was Leptolylax pelodytoides
    [​IMG]

    Leptobrachium smithi was not uncommon, but not as commonly found as in the south of the country.
    [​IMG]

    This is the only Occidozyga martensii captured. Three were found, but the other two got away.
    [​IMG]

    A small Odorana livida. This frog is usually found in the vicinity of waterfalls and fast moving streams.
    [​IMG]

    Most people like snakes, so here is a nice one: Boiga multomaculata
    [​IMG]
     
  10. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Althought the frogs are cute, I have to say snakes are my favorite ;)
     
  11. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Very very nice. Thanks for the show and tell.
     
  12. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Nice finds! Last I did any research on Odorana livida it was still Rana livida (green cascade frog). I can't find anything on Odorana though. Now I'm intrigued!
     
  13. MoogleBass

    MoogleBass Kittes are so nice! Premium Member

    Awesome, The one grey and red eyed frog looks sweet. The snake looks like an ATB, but im gonna guess a bit nippier and deadlier.
     
  14. Michael_C

    Michael_C Elite Member

    Sorry, I had it wrong by one 'r'. It is Odorrana livida. It was originally Rana livida, but was Huia livida before being changed to Odorrana livida. Reference is: Frost et al. 2006. The Amphibian Tree of Life. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. Number 297. 370 pp.

    This was primarily done on account of the sister species: Odorrana chloronata, which we also saw on the survey.
    [​IMG]
    Had to get a picture of this specimen in this particular setting because one of the Odorrana livida escaped when I tried to get a picture of it. The frogs of this genus are difficult to catch and have an amazing leaping ability.

    Here is one that stayed in the Huia genus. Huia nasica
    [​IMG]

    Here is one of the many other species that has a name change: Duttaphrynus melanostictus
    [​IMG]

    Here is one I just uploaded tonight looking for some of the other amphibians.
    Xenophrys major
    [​IMG]
    Cheers,
    Michael
     
  15. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    WOW that Leptobrachium smithi has amazing eyes! Mother Nature is an unbeatable artist!
    Great pics! More please...more.... :D
     
  16. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Ah, the correct spelling helped, lol. 2006 huh, that's pretty dang recent, no wonder I hadn't heard of it yet. Thanks for the updated info! And awesome photos too :D
     
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