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My First Ever Reptile

Discussion in 'Ball Pythons' started by Quick_slick, Jul 1, 2017.

  1. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    One day i came back home and my family told me they got a snake from a friend who didn't want it anymore. I decided to take the snake because I've always wanted one and no one else was going to take care of it. To make a long story short I've never had a reptile of any sort and I'm trying to learn as much as i can with just google. The snake is a ball python and when i got it it was in horrible condition with a terribly dirty cage about a week ago I've cleaned the cage, changed her bottom, bought a bigger water dish and got a humidity gauge. I'm afraid if something is wrong with the snake or if I'm under feeding it or what. The snake hasn't shed since it's been in my care witch has been about a month and a half. I've been feeding twice a week but I'm unsure if the food is large enough for her. She hasn't pooped since i first got her. I don't know how old she is or how much she weighs. I'm unsure if she has beggining stages of scale rot or some other skin condition. Please someone help me out i want my snake to live a long healthy life. And if you can, can someone identify the pattern or whatever it's called of my python? 1498890494086-2071164971.jpg 1498890538208-227423397.jpg 1498890659372-550901406.jpg 14988907251002021657155.jpg 1498890774363-241761250.jpg
     
  2. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    Hey, I think you are going to be a great snake parent just from what you have said! So this is a normal ball python, not a morph or anything, looks slightly underweight but nothing to worry about immediately, in my opinion if your feeding twice a week for a snake this size you should bump her up to a larger meal. The mice or rat offered should be alittle thicker than her thickest part. Don't worry about the pooping that might be because of smallish meals? I don't see an indication of scale rot from the pics...
    One thing I can critique is I don't much like reptile carpet with snakes, it's hard to keep appropriate humidity and I don't think it's very comfortable. Put in some eco-earth or something. You can also get a jungle floor substrate mix that a lot of people like. Just watch the humidity and make sure it stays around 50-60.
    What are the basking temps? I didnt see a heatlamp or heater but I hope you have one because that is critical.
     
  3. Kornel

    Kornel Active Member

    That's definitely a normal ball python !
     
  4. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    I do have a heat lamp but i haven't used it because where i live the temperatures get up to 100-110's in the summer. In her cage it stays around 80 day and night so i wasn't sure if i needed to keep the heatlamp on or not.
     
  5. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    But I doubt that its 100-110 inside the house. The snake needs a basking spot of 90 degrees.
     
  6. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Do you think it'd be smart to buy a heatpad then? Or would the heatlamp suffice even though her cage is always around 80 degrees?
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I would go with the heat pad.
     
  8. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Any remendations on where to place the pad from the picture of her cage above?
     
  9. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Recommendations*
     
  10. EctoJoJo

    EctoJoJo Well-Known Member

    Off to one of the far sides would good to have the most of a gradient. I always kept the heat source on the opposite side of the water source - but an additional water source above the pad would also help with raising humidity.
     
  11. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Thank you and that's why i keep some wet sponges in her tank
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The problem with wet sponges is they are a breeding ground for bacteria and mold.

    I always put my heat source in one end of the enclosure. This creates a thermal gradient so the animal can choose the temperature it wants.
     
  13. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Thanks for giving the warning. As soon as i buy my heating pad I'll put another smaller water dish to help with humidity, probably a small tupperware or something like that.
     
  14. EctoJoJo

    EctoJoJo Well-Known Member

    Yeah, fancy stuff like that comes from chain pet stores looks nice, but lots of household items can suffice just the same. Tupperware, butter dishes etc. will work well for dishes and hides. Then as you want to work toward a more aesthetically pleasing setup you can swap out from there. I personally like to look through the articles section and find little projects to work on. It makes the whole experience more fulfilling imo. Best of luck to you.
     
  15. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    Thank you very much.
     
  16. Quick_slick

    Quick_slick Member

    ---------UPDATE ON MY SNAKE-----------
    Her belly has been turning pink and I've read this is a sign she will shed soon. Is this true and what should i know for her shed I've never experienced one before.
     
  17. EctoJoJo

    EctoJoJo Well-Known Member

    She might refuse food and act a little defensive or off for a bit since her senses will be diminished from the loose layer of skin. If you know it's coming I used to do the moist hide on the warm side with a semi rough object like a stone in the center. It always help immensely with them working off that outside layer.
     
  18. EctoJoJo

    EctoJoJo Well-Known Member

    Another bit of advise is to stick around and read up on other threads. You will be able to pickup on info you might need down the road or you didn't know you already needed.
     

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