This Disappears When Logged In

My Emerald Swifts

Discussion in 'Lizards - General' started by DwarvenChef, Mar 1, 2012.

  1. klinger

    klinger Member

    So in the first pic it shows the whole tank. The normal basking is on the right.
    The day I saw babies I set up an additional, but lower wattage on the left because babies hang out there, too. Plus that branch is so high and close to the cage top.
    I dont have room for another basking site on the right at present. I can add/move it to that side but need to wait till weekend to have temps safely checked over time. (I dont want that side to be an oven either, :confused: )
    Do you recommend just the one then? Or two on one end? OR one on each end? :confused:
    Plus one more note the tank pic on left was from over 18 months ago. The plant growth is much more thick and more accurate in the last photo.
    I will need to pick up another jar of fruit flys this weekend too.:( So many go into the water dish and die but it is fun watching the little guys chase them down.
    I did get a shot of 4 kids together when I upload to laptop I will post.:">
     
  2. klinger

    klinger Member

    thank you. :D
    Dad looks pretty proud. We have quite a few shots with the parents and their kids.
    These are the first reptiles I have ever bred so I am pretty proud too. :-"
     
  3. klinger

    klinger Member

    Here are the group shots. I can so far only get the group of 4 shots but there are 6 kids total. 101_1416.jpg 101_1418.jpg 101_1427.jpg 101_1429.jpg
     
  4. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    I'm lovin the pics :)

    With the dence planting I would think one at each end would be fine. I really like your tank set up :) Makes me wish I had more in mine, I feel a planting spree coming on :p
     
  5. klinger

    klinger Member

    It really was quite easy to do. Once planted and set up, the tank becomes pretty self sustaining. Other than checking temps, clipping back plants, feeding and changing water the only other thing to do is mist. I do of course keep track of when to replace my lights.:)
     
  6. CentriRitanni

    CentriRitanni Elite Member

    Cabbage plants so surprisingly well in tanks, along with pothos and spider plants, of course. I think I've gone through at least twenty varieties figuring out what grows well. @.@ Let my trauma advise you! Ha!
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Cabbage?
     
  8. CentriRitanni

    CentriRitanni Elite Member

    Lettuce. Kale and the like. Not cabbage. (shhhhh)
     
  9. Genko

    Genko Elite Member


    Fantastic! Your Swifts are lovely.

    Genko
     
  10. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    I have spider plants all over the place at my current location. I'm soaking a few to try out, can't get a posative answer about pesticides used around the building so I'm soaking/rinsing them for a few days to wash off what I can.
     
  11. klinger

    klinger Member

    I have never tried spider plants I suppose they would work well.
    I have tried Pothos but the leaves are so big that they didnt work well in my tank.
    So I did the small leaved Philodendron instead. Then there are some sword things that are multicolored that start with a D...dracaena or something like that. Then two diffenbachia varieties to simulate little tree type growths and a Z plant..not sure the real name but they are in my Crested's tank and they are so so hardy I love them.
    I have had other plants too but because of the humidity and they trampling they didnt work. I even planted grass seed. Looked cool but did not last long. Plus for fertilizing and light....not all house plants I have found like alot of UV/sun/heat for 12 to 14 hours a day:)
     
  12. CentriRitanni

    CentriRitanni Elite Member

    Generally speaking, house plants are intended to be inside, meaning moderate temperatures, minimal UVB, and no wind/foot traffic. They are babies, basically.
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    LOL! "House" plants!
    They actually did originate outside!;)
     
  14. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Do the swifts nibble on plants? Both dracaena as well as diffenbachia have toxins.
    And both will grow quite tall!
     
  15. klinger

    klinger Member

    DwarvenChef ...question.

    So I will be pulling babies within the next month or so to a 15g tall.
    Do you know at what age I will be able to tell sex differences? I have tried finding this info and no luck. I just want to know how much time I have before dad sees little juniors running around and gets mad..lol.

    {{So far all is good. :)I do have one "iffy" baby that is a clear runt. :(So much smaller than everyone else...but eats and drinks and basks with everyone else so I think it will do just fine..I bought 2 more colonies of fruit flies a different larger variety. Cant wait till they are big enough for small crickets.:) }}
    Mom and dad love butter worms.
     
  16. klinger

    klinger Member

    NO they do not nibble.
    Also I have had these two set up in tank with those 2 plants for over 2 years....I keep the tops of the plants trimmed to contain height and trim side shoots.
    Philodendron also has toxins.
    Some sources say that E. Swifts will take some fruit but I have never had any luck with that.
     
  17. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    Merlin, Some swifts have been known to nibble flowers and some softer tiny plant material, some say out of mistaken identity for bugs but a few speices have been known to live off plants when bugs are "out of season". In my area I have observed S. occedentalis eating wildflowers in breazy conditions... the flowers wiggle like bugs and I can see the issues about mistaken ID of food, but also there seems to be more to it. It's something I really want to work on when I start up my S. occ colony (when my wife isn't looking :p )

    Klinger, Sexual maturaty in the wild is about 3 years old... given the fact that they are only awake a few months out of the year in the wild I can easaly believe it. However in the home where is never really gets cold and food is available year round I would imagin that time would be cut down greatly. However, with females at least, size is more important to maturatiy at least in the wild... Male maturaty (haha that sounds like an oxymoron :p) happens sooner I think one year was what I read in my field reports. Males will develop femeral pores and color up MUCH faster than the ladies will so if you start noticing lots of green on some and not others, they may be males, even though there are some very green females out there... Son in captivity I'm thinking one season will show a difference between male and female.
     
  18. CentriRitanni

    CentriRitanni Elite Member

    Yes, but there's a reason that most people keep them inside... >.> *cough* "...moderate temperatures, minimal UVB, and no wind..." There's a reason I called them babies. :b Yes, I realize, all plants are technically outdoor plants, but "house plants" tend to thrive more indoors than out EXCEPT in the particular zone/climate from which they originated. Oy, keep this up and I'll state everything as a logic proof. >,..,>
     
  19. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    LOL! I was just yanking your chain!!
     
  20. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    LOL **** hath no fury... :p
     

Share This Page