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Multiple Monitors in One Enclosure?

Discussion in 'Monitors' started by cmarsh86, Feb 25, 2010.

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  1. cmarsh86

    cmarsh86 New Member

    I currently have one monitor, about 18", that I just got recently and am interested in getting a second somewhere down the road. I was wondering if it was safe to put both monitors in one enclosure or if it is better off doing two separate enclosures. The lady at the reptile store said they tend to get very territorial but I wanted to get your advice. Thanks
     
  2. MamaGwynn

    MamaGwynn Elite Member

    What type of monitor do you have and in what size enclosure? Monitors require a very large amount of space. Two monitors require double that! It's usually not wise to keep more than one together, because with some species you'll have one animal dominating the other which causes a lot of stress. One could end up dead. I'm sure others with more experience than I will chime in as well.
     
  3. cmarsh86

    cmarsh86 New Member

    It's a Savannah monitor. My girlfriend and I just recently built an enclosure for him. It's 4x3x2. We know this is not the ideal size, but it should work for now. We're moving from an apartment in California to a house in Washington and just needed something better then the 50 gal aquarium we got him in.
     
  4. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    The lady at the petstore gave you some good advice, it IS possible to keep two together, but there will always be domination issues, especially if one animal is habituated to the enclosure and you introduce a second, even the babies are capable of killing each other. Are you intending to try and breed, then of course they would be together?
    Can you also give details of temps, humidity, foods and feeding regime, lighting/heating? Thanks!
     
  5. cmarsh86

    cmarsh86 New Member

    First off, I'm definitely not looking to breed. I'm nowhere near experienced enough to even consider that. I was just thinking that companionship couldn't hurt. (obviously it can) The temps are 131f on his elevated basking spot. (*that brings me to another question i will ask at the bottom of this post) 90f ambient and 82f on the cool side ( the cool side thermometer is mounted higher, about a foot above his hide so i'm not sure if 82f is very accurate.) The humidity fluctuates far to often. I'm taking action to try and solve this problem next week by replacing the top of my enclosure with exact dimensions of plywood. I was off about 1/2 inch on each side and i'm pretty sure i'm losing alot of moisture through those cracks. So i cannot give you an accurate humidity reading but i'm spraying it down 2-3 times a day.
    As for feeding regime, the only thing he has eatin is 2 pinkies. 1 the day i got him (February 14) and 1 today. I've tried feeding him crickets and small feeder fish with no luck. So, for right now i'm going to be testing the waters and seeing what he will eat. After I find out what he'll eat i'm sure i'll be asking how often i should feed him this and that.
    * Now back to my basking question. I have a 150w basking bulb and his basking spot is on a large shelf in his enclosure with a ramp leading up to the shelf. I have a large piece of sandstone right below the light. I've set the digital thermometer directly on the sandstone to get an accurate reading, it's at 131f. The problem is, is that he never basks there. He's been up there 2-3 times but quickly comes down to his favorite spot midway up the ramp. What's up with that?
    I appreciate all the help.
    Chris
     
  6. shwknight

    shwknight Elite Member

    I would take a temperature reading of where he sits at and then drop the temp of his basking spot to that temperature to see if he starts to use the basking spot. It could be that he doesn't like the temperature where it is and that is why he is laying on the ramp because it is at the temperature he wants to bask at.
     
  7. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    O.k if you don`t want to try breeding just yet, keep ONE monitor `til you have more experience! Foods: As much variety as possible, whole prey items only, roaches are excellent, crickets, mealworms etc, pinkie mice are virtually useless for an 18 inch juvenile monitor, he should be able to take fuzzies, but not too many, they are insect eaters in the wild, although as they grow other foods are acceptable. The basking temp sounds o.k, is the main light pointed at the platform? Also, UVB is very beneficial to varanids, they are diurnal basking animals, although if you can give exposure to natural unfiltered sunlight on a regular basis, supplementary D3 is not necessary.You really need to get a digital hygrometer, quite cheap, and very accurate, and a temp gun too. Can you put a couple of photos up? Thanks!
     
  8. MamaGwynn

    MamaGwynn Elite Member

    Yea pinkies are a little small for a sav that big. Sounds like he's refusing food while trying to get settled in though if he wouldn't eat the other items.
     
  9. AS far as two monitors in the same cage. We have a male and female in the same cage and they do fine except for when feeding or right after feeding. Males don't so much get along with other males when they are full grown (speaking from experience). They didn't fight but you could tell they were not as happy and comfortable as when they were separated. Savannah Monitors do not need "friends" or really care about them, so not having a companion for your savannah is not hurting his feelings.

    All this spoken from experience, we have three of them.
     
  10. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    You say they do fine except when feeding and after, in that case they DON`T do fine, stress is stress whatever the cause and however long it goes on for; also, you say the males don`t get along when full grown, even the babies/juveniles are capable of kiilling each other, but it`s good you don`t recommend keeeping them together as a "norm"!
     
  11. I said not to keep males together period. Yes I said as adults because that is what I own. And they don't fight when they feed. They are not stressed. Just animals are animals and what smells like food is food to them. They are competitive when they eat. So do not change what I said. I was giving my advice from PERSONAL experience.
    Here are my male and female...DO they look stressed? And if males and females couldn't go together (so you seem to think) how do they breed?[​IMG]

    That is how they act towards each other all the time. And you also can not expect them to get along if they are in a small enclosure...we have all of ours in custom built enclosures that can house multiple animals comfortably.

    another thing I would like to add. I work at a petstore and when we get savannahs in they are babies/juveniles housed in the same enclosures and NOT ONCE have we had them fight. But we do not recommend keeping them like that through adult hood. They are not like the bearded dragon juveniles who will bite the toes, legs, face, tail etc. of their cage mates/siblings. We have owned savannahs for years.
     
  12. silentjt

    silentjt Elite Member

    Males.

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  13. Good lookin fellas. Its cool that youve had luck with 2 males together. When I built the cage for my savannahs, back when I only had 2 males, I tried, but they were not fond of eachother, so I put a wooden divider in the middle. I guess the best advise to give is put them together and watch carefully for at least 30 mins for any signs of aggression, if they seem fine together, id say its ok, if they show signs of aggression, I personally wouldnt risk it! =D
     
  14. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Have you read what I said?? I know you weren`t advising people to keep them together, but you mentioned adult males, you also said they get along except at meal times, so I merely stated that even then it`s stressful. Hatchlings are capable of killing each other, and that is perfectly true! And of course you can keep male and female monitors together, although some people recommend only during the breeding season, others keep them together permanently, as with most things, there are exceptions to the rule. (And in a few of the pygmy monitor species, they are often kept in small groups). ;)

    Are you saying it`s o.k to house baby monitors together, if yes, at what age do you recommend seperating them?
    I can assure you they ARE like the bearded dragons juveniles that bite the toes, legs, face and tails etc, they are quite capable of inflicting serious/fatal injuries!!
     
  15. Og_

    Og_ Elite Member

    I would advise just keeping one animal for a couple of years just to learn everything that is possible for a single animal before moving to keep multiple ones.
    The people who have the biggest success with keeping animals are the ones who are not in a hurry to get to the "Expert" level!

    Reptile care falls in the "Continuing education" department!
    You can learn a lot from the start, but you will spend a lifetime learning more things that you never thought to consider!

    That is a fact that is true in every aspect of life!
     
  16. I did not come here to prove my expertise. I gave some of my advice from PERSONAL experience. If they want to question me about it I will surely answer them but I will not sit here and get harped at for my advice.
    I can also assure you that with my experience in keeping monitors none of mine ever bit the toes off of eachother. I did not say that they were incapable. I said that they did not try. Of course, if you have them in a small enclosure (as with most animals) they are going to be aggressive towards each other.

    In closing Og_ was correct in stating that is it a (continuing education). What works for me might not work for you and what works for Silentjt might not work for most people either. All animals are different and not all behave the same. Our taiwanese beauty rat is a perfect example of that. We have not met one person that has met a nice one but my husband can open up the snakes mouth and put his hand, finger, nose, lips etc in it and it will not bite down.
     
  17. Savannah jay 1

    Savannah jay 1 New Member

  18. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    This thread is almost 8 years old! Most of the participants are no longer around.
     
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