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Male vs. Female frogs

Discussion in 'Tree Frogs' started by geckogirl95, Apr 3, 2007.

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  1. geckogirl95

    geckogirl95 Elite Member

    How can you tell if a frog is a boy or a girl???
     
  2. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Is there a certain species in which you are inquiring about :)
     
  3. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    I actually need to know this, because when I get my dumpies, I want to be sure to get a male and a female.
     
  4. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Heres what we have in our caresheet: Whites Tree Frog Caresheet

    It is easier, yet can still difficult, to determine the sex of an adult frog rather than a juvenile. Adult females are usually larger and more robust than males, they have larger supratympanic ridges and their heads may be a little smaller. Males can be recognized by the looser skin on the throat and "nuptial pads" on the inside of their hands, which appear on a breeding male. A male can also be determined by his "calling". Both females and males can croak, however females tend to only croak when disturbed from sleep or rest. Males will croak in order to "call" to a female, and the loose skin on their throats will fill out with air. The male call is a deeper sound than that of a female, and often if more than one male is present, once one begins calling the others will follow, as if in competition with each other. Males and females can be housed together, and successful breeding should not occur without external stimuli. Only specimens of a similar size should be kept together, as an adult will only recognize a juvenile as food


    Heres another caresheet with some sexing info: White's Tree Frog Care Sheet
     
  5. nicole

    nicole Elite Member

    I know I have at least Two males in my enclosure as they are constantly croaking, especially when you mist them! They also have huge bubbles on their throat when doing this. The one I have never seen croak is the biggest so I am assuming that one is female. I can tell you when the males start going off she is not the slightest bit impressed, lol. I also think that it is harder to sex them when they are smaller, but then again that is just my opinion.
     
  6. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    yeah, i got that whole nuptual pad and croaking thing. But I want to be sure I get a male and a female from the breeder guy. Hard to tell with a juvenile. luck of the draw?
     
  7. nicole

    nicole Elite Member

    I dont know, since he is a breeder maybe he can tell as he does it all the time. I have just found it harder to tell when they are small.
     
  8. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    As Marsha insinuated, it can depend on the species in question. The methods for sexing White's tree frogs is pretty much the same for most frogs though (with exception of the supratympanic ridges). One way to tell in some species, such as Oriental fire-bellied toads, is that the males will often mount other frogs, whether they're male or female. A female won't show this behavior as far as I know.

    As for sexing juveniles, I don't know of a way to accomplish that. There are few frogs that exhibit sexual dimorphism, so the most accurate way to tell is to wait until they are breeding adults.
     
  9. MRHickey

    MRHickey Elite Member

    I don't know if it is true with dumpy frogs, but I know with other frogs, they can carry both male and female traits till close to maturity, and then take on a sex based upon environment. If you are going to a breeder, then I would ask them, they would know more about that particular species, and even the care guides only give you so much help, a lot of sexing ease comes with experience.
     
  10. geckogirl95

    geckogirl95 Elite Member

    The frogs that I'm asking about are a firebelly toad and a grey tree frog.
     
  11. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    All by itself it's pretty hard, if not impossible, to sex an Oriental fire-bellied toad. Unlike many other frogs, they do not possess an inflatable vocal sac. If conditions are right, a male gray tree frog will start to call though, whereas a female will not.
     
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