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Just Finished Building My Enclosure Any Ideas for Improvements

Discussion in 'Enclosures' started by dreke89, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

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    It is a birch enclosure with tiger maple sideing, sealed with a non-toxic whey based sealer, an under ground burrow with red lights and a life stream video camera, removable wooden top over a sheet of hardware cloth for humid days, lights are built into the top, cant be taken off without removeing top,, slideing glass doors, ajustable vents and a built in potted plant. inside i have a hot and cool side hide, live pothos vine, asorted fake plants and vines( held up with rubber encased hooks), humidifier, water dish with wood barrier, 4 thermostats and 2 hydromiters, and one female ball python named Harold

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    tell me what you think
     
  2. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    Awesome cage!
     
  3. Infernalis

    Infernalis Elite Member

    That is an incredibly nice setup. My only thoughts are that with such a heavy bodied snake, any plants are likely to get mashed.
     
  4. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

    ya pothos vines where the only plant recomended to have with a BP becouse they are durable and hardy the rest are fake
     
  5. Guppyfry

    Guppyfry Member

    Wow! How the heck can anyone improve on that!
     
  6. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

    thank you
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The only thing I would change is the lighting in the burrow. It defeats the concept of the dark hiding spot.
     
  8. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

    ya that is for the live feed web cam, i was sure to get red light as to not effect the nocturnal nature of a ball python,,,,, simmilar to a red nocturnal viewing light
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    The problem is I don't buy the whole reptiles can't see red light pitch.
    I have had too many cases where the red lights did disturb them.
     
  10. BarelyBreathing

    BarelyBreathing Elite Member

    Yes, I agree with Merlin on this. Other than that, what a phenomenal set up.
     
  11. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

    but the eyes in snakes only contain rods and not cones,,, meaning they can only see in black and white, red light is unique in that it is so flush with color that it can not be detected aswell as normal light, this includes low level moon light, that is also why red lights do not ruin a human's night vision
     
  12. justor

    justor Elite Member

    Interesting... have you noticed the snake making use of the burrow yet? Have you thought about using some type of night vision infra-red camera in the burrow? That would be pretty awesome if you knew how to do it, but I don't think your average webcam has that capability.

    I really like the idea of an underground hiding spot, and your enclosure as a whole looks great. Good job.
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    That may be but in my personal experience I had snakes that were hesitant to come out when the red lights were on.
    Turn the lights off and they were all over the cage!
    I guess your best bet is to watch and see if the snake utilises the burrow.
     
  14. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    Snakes have both rods and cones.
     
  15. justor

    justor Elite Member

  16. BarelyBreathing

    BarelyBreathing Elite Member

    +1. Snakes can see colors.
     
  17. dreke89

    dreke89 Member

    she is in the burrow all the time,,and all over the cage at night with her red light on, and those cones are for ultra violate colors that are in all light and is in the darkest of burrows,,, i used to use UV goggles when i was in the marine corps. red is also on the opposite side of the light spectrum as uv light so it will have less
     
  18. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    According to the source provided by Austin, ball pythons (Python regius) are most sensitive to purples, greens, and blues but there's no evidence suggesting that they aren't also sensitive to reds. The graphs included note only peak absorptions.
     
  19. justor

    justor Elite Member

    That link I provided actually states that they have two types of cones. And it says the UV detecting cones are "relatively rare". Don't know if that means in animals/reptiles in general, or if they are actually considered to be uncommon in the eye of a ball python... point being they have more than one type of cone.
     
  20. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    Also, the absorbance curve from the ultraviolet-sensitive cone coupled with the nomogram curve for a vitamin-A1-based visual pigment shows max wavelength absorption at 360nm, which is at the tail end of the visible light spectrum/UV spectrum or purple. :)
     

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