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Is My Savannah Monitor Healthy

Discussion in 'Monitors' started by StrangeHairyMan, Sep 5, 2018.

  1. StrangeHairyMan

    StrangeHairyMan New Member

    i got my savannah last january when he was around 2-3 months old. he is very active and eats alot but he hasn't taken a poop in a couple of weeks wich worries me a little. i did change hes enclosure a while ago added more dirt and made his basking spot bigger. the basking temp is around 125-130f but im getting a third basking light soon. he eats three times a week monday wensday and friday he gets crikets and a couple of meal worms. i am plannig on getting roaches but my local pet store does not have any and its to cold to order any online. i live in northen sweden so its pretty cold here. he also gets a pinkie once a month. if you see anything wrong with him or hes enclosure pls let me know. btw would be nice to know if its a male or female

    sry for bad spelling or writing was a dumb boi who skipped school 20180905_140111.jpg 20180905_140136.jpg 20180905_135311.jpg 20180905_140104.jpg
     

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  2. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    From looking at the photos I would say you have a very nice enclosure and the monitor looks in nice condition (at least on the outside). I think it is older than you believe because if you got it in January 2018 it was probably hatched the year before (springtime 2017).
    If you are only feeding very small amounts of food several times per week the monitor will not need to defaecate much at all, I think it is very important to feed only as much energy (food) as they use, but in this case you can offer more.
    Can you give details of the type and wattage of the heat bulbs and UVB if you are using it?
    It is not possible to say whether it is male or female, can you give a reasonably accurate length measurement of the monitor?
     
  3. StrangeHairyMan

    StrangeHairyMan New Member

    Thanks for the info right now im not using UVB because it stopped working a couple of weeks ago. the heat bulbs are 95 watt will start feeding more once i get more money i just moved so i am a poor at the moment. length is around 10 or 11 inches but i am not sure he or she got rather angry att the ruler and tried to eat it. but its not to important to me if its a male or female
     
  4. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Can you take photo of the heat (basking) bulbs in position?
    It is extremely important to know whether you have a male or female because if female it will require suitable nesting at all times. If the monitor is only approximately 25 to 30cm total length it is very small considering it probably hatched in 2017? It is possible even at the current size the animal might already be sexually mature.
    Because you are feeding mainly an invertebrate diet, UVB exposure is likely to be beneficial. Pinky mice contain very little nourishment, it is better to offer a fuzzy mouse (fresh killed or thawed from frozen) but the majority of prey should be invertebrate...
    How deep is the substrate and what are the temperatures from the bottom (floor of the enclosure) upwards and over the whole floor space (in case the monitor is female and requires nesting)?
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2018
  5. Lori68

    Lori68 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Really nice enclosure for a young sav, you've put a lot of thought into providing a stimulating home for him/her. Do be careful about the amount of food being offered. Its probably a good idea to get in the habit of controlling intake so that obesity doesn't happen. Nightcrawlers (also known as lob worms or bait worms) is a good food item to add to the list if you haven't already been doing that. Seafood can also be added for a bit of variety like prawns or crayfish
     
  6. jonathan.piazza91

    jonathan.piazza91 Active Member

    Beautiful enclosure. I am no monitor expert but as everyone above has stated, there is nothing from your pictures that indicate poor health.
     
  7. StrangeHairyMan

    StrangeHairyMan New Member

    The Substrate is 45 cm deep i have 3 more bags of dirt so can add more if needed. the floor of the enclosure is 80F but drops to 72F on the cool side. i did successfully measure the monitor today and he or she is around 36 cm from head to tail.
     

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  8. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    At 36cm it is very possible the monitor is already sexually mature, there is a 50% chance it is female, if that is the case the substrate needs to be heated throughout the whole enclosure to quite a narrow range of temps to offer the animal the best chance of finding a suitable nesting site, the eggs will normally incubate around the mid 30`s C, so you will need to ensure that at least at mid depth or so (25cm) that is the approximate temperature of the substrate. How did you measure the substrate temps?
    I think it is always best to provide those conditions unless you are sure the monitor is a male (which we do not know)?
    There are more efficient "basking" bulbs than the "reptile" type you appear to be using (can you confirm the brand/type)?
    Most experienced keepers are using the relatively low wattage flood beam halogen bulbs (@ 50 to 80w or so depending on enclosure size and type) either par 30 or par 38 (the "par" only refers to the bulb face diameter) they are cheap to buy and can be fitted with a dimmer switch to make adjusting the surface temp easier, or obviously you can raise/lower bulb/s or basking object.
    012.JPG
     
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  9. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I personally would limit the amount of seafood offered because I`m not sure V. exanthematicus have salt secreting glands, but freshwater shrimp/similar and fish are a decent addition to the diet if the monitor will take them.
    If it is possible can you get a few photos similar to this of the vent area, the tail must not rest on anything (as when the monitor is standing or walking along).... It does not matter that I am showing a different species...


    7833916556_ed504a68a1[1].jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2018
  10. StrangeHairyMan

    StrangeHairyMan New Member

    I used a temp gun to measure the substrate temps dont know if thats a good way to do it. i dont know what brand the basking bulbs are got them with the Monitor the guy i bought them from just said that they where 95W basking bulbs. but i will se if i can find some flood beam halogen bulbs. cant get a picture of the monitor because the lights are off and he is hiding. my internet will be down for a couple of days but will upload a picture once i have internet again. if i remember im working alot this week so i dont have much time off. but thanks for all the info i appreciate it alot.
     
  11. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    To correct myself; the eggs will usually incubate between approx. 27 to 32c, it`s known that longer incubation times usually produce more robust hatchlings with the yolk sac fully absorbed... The substrate temps should reflect that to a large degree throughout, obviously they may be lower towards the bottom and higher nearer the top, especially around the basking site. Measuring with a Temp-gun is fine...
     

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