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Injured Lizard Please Help

Discussion in 'Lizards - General' started by FENCELIZMOM, Jul 8, 2018.

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  1. FENCELIZMOM

    FENCELIZMOM New Member

    I have 2 one year old fence lizards one male one female. The females eyes were closed for quite some time she is smaller than the male so I thought she was sleeping but then the dirt kept getting stuck on her eyes so I wiped it off I did that for a two to three days then I skipped a day and it crusted on her eye i pulled it off again and she has not opened then for a long gone while I would say 2 weeks. What is wrong and how to treat. She laid eggs about a week ago but they did not survive.
     

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  2. Cherux02

    Cherux02 Active Member

    Its probably time for a vet visit for some eye ointment. Is it lethargic this whole time as well? Being smaller and sleeping all the time sounds like it needs to be separated from the male during her recovery. Replies here will probably ask for details about the enclosure and general care to try to identify any underlying issues leading up to illness. If you post all the information and pictures you can, it could help you get more detailed responses.
     
  3. FENCELIZMOM

    FENCELIZMOM New Member

    I have a 10 gal tank coconut husk bedding stuff a heat bulb on opposite side as heating rock I also have the uv bulb that is not a heat bulb both 12 inches from the bottom of the tank tank is in the basement so it gets cold with out heat source I turn both lights off every night and I have some wood in the back of the tank for them to climb on a year ago they were wild
     
  4. FENCELIZMOM

    FENCELIZMOM New Member

    Also I feed them meal worms everywhere day about to worms for each lizard she refuses to eat I know since she had eggs she did not have an appetite but she has not eaten in 13 days at least
     
  5. Cherux02

    Cherux02 Active Member

    After two weeks in poor condition, earlier vet care is the way to go. There's probably more going on than an eye thing. Dehydration, impaction or metabolic bone disease are biggies. I'll put out some information on the things.
    Heat rocks arnt used hardly any more because they can burn a belly and not make ambient heat. Imagine if you were naked outside on a cold night with a boiling hot water bottle to keep you warm. Too hot where you cling to it but you are still too cold. Insulating the tank to keep the ideal temperature and keeping the desired temp with bulbs is usual.
    I'm not sure when the uv bulb was replaced, but they have to be replaced every 6 months to keep the uv output up. They keep making visible light after the uv wears out. I didn't see anything about calcium supplement. Even with a new uv bulb to help absorb calcium, the calcium has to be provided in the diet. For a female lizard that laid eggs, calcium powder supplement and new uv bulbs are important. That kind of issue leads to lethargy, paralysis and death. A vet would provide calcium injections or other interventions to reverse it.
    Dehydration is something everyone started talking about with Savannah monitors and bearded dragons. "Desert" lizards still burrow into humid hide-outs. Dry tanks where lizards hide under a rock or log are like lizard jerky machines where their organs, like kidneys, eventually fail. Providing the option of humid hides or deep substrate (especially for gravid females) helps long-term.
    Impaction came to mind from both calcium and because mealworms have a lot of hard exoskeleton. The paralysis from lack of calcium can start on smooth muscles in the gut causing impaction before it spreads to the back legs and up the spine. But even on an otherwise healthy lizard, accidentally eating bedding or having a knot of worm skeletons in the belly can cause impaction, loss of appetite and eventually death. A variety of food including ones with less exoskeleton helps like crickets, waxworms and other small items. A vet can help diagnose and clear impactions.
    So that's a head start. I know a vet sometimes seems like a big deal for a wild lizard, but once you've brought it inside, I dunno, I'm sure the intention wasn't to see it waste away. I didn't even get into parasites, surface temperatures vs ambient temperature, the difficulty making a heat gradient in a 10 gallon, male aggression towards females that dont want to breed, theres a lot could be going on. Hopefully you can research some of the common lizard illnesses and prevent more and more of them.
     
  6. Cherux02

    Cherux02 Active Member

    Oh and sorry I didn't directly address the eye thing. If it's an eye infection then a vet would have ointment for that but I figured the eye was just a symptom rather than the main problem. If a person with a weepy eye looked like they were sleeping all the time and stopped eating for days and days it would look pretty steep for pink eye.
     
  7. FENCELIZMOM

    FENCELIZMOM New Member

    I think that she scratched her eye either by the male or the bedding I wiped away the mess from her eye again and she did. Open it so a second she still likes to sleep and rest on the rock I separated her and have paper towels down so no more debris can get in the eye
     

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