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I Bought a Bearded Dragon

Discussion in 'Bearded Dragons' started by bradyloach, Feb 25, 2012.

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  1. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Haha I think your paranoia is getting the best of you. As I said, if they are set up properly you should have zero issues using them, even with smaller tanks :)
     
  2. bradyloach

    bradyloach Elite Member

    Umm, what is your take on feeding them that's bearded dragon pebbles food? The red little pebbles with insects in it
     
  3. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    I feed them to my feeders!
     
  4. ToriH

    ToriH Elite Member

    I have never heard of the "pebbles with insects in it". What brand is it?
     
  5. ToriH

    ToriH Elite Member

    Vers,maybe I am, but hey I got my husbandry down and a very happy spoiled little brat I'm a complete slave to. Lol. You can go either way bradyloach :)
     
  6. bradyloach

    bradyloach Elite Member

    I think it's flunkers. It's like red pebbles with parts of insects in it
     
  7. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    With any type of UVB bulb, It should be the proper distance from the reptiles basking spot. So I'm sure that every bulb is different and everyone should go with the directions on the box.
     
  8. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Some of those diets do contain insects. Reading the label is always a good idea.

    the exo terra brand ingredients adult ;
    Ground corn, ground wheat, corn gluten meal, soybean meal, alfalfa meal, dried beet pulp, dicalcium phosphate, lecithin, kelp meal, brewers dried yeast, salt, calcium carbonate, Dl-methionine, calcium proplonate (a preservative), spirulina, nopal cactus, yucca schidgera extract, niacin, ascorbic acid (vitamin C), zinc oxide, manganous oxide, calcium panthothenate, iron sulfate, copper sulfate, beta carotene, riboflavin, pyridoxine hydrochloride, thiamine mononitrate, menadione sodium bisulfite complex (source of vitamin K activity), folic acid, calcium iodate, sodium selentie, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, vitamin E supplement, vitamin A acetate, vitamin D3 supplement.

    here is a link to the ingredients of the fluker's brand buffet, never seen this one before.
    Bearded Dragon Diets: Fluker's Bearded Dragon Buffet Blend at Drs. Foster and Smith
     
  9. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    No doubt, Tori, I just wanted to make sure it's understood that an mvb is not overkill in such cases...this is how misinformation spreads.
     
  10. bradyloach

    bradyloach Elite Member

    Heat dropped lots, so I put a pink light bulb in there for night. Lizards can't see like shades of red light right
     
  11. Jessica90

    Jessica90 Elite Member

    i read that bearded dragons can see red so you should probably invest in a heat emitter
     
  12. bradyloach

    bradyloach Elite Member

    Oh fudge ok!
     
  13. Jessica90

    Jessica90 Elite Member

    welp good thing i just gave her those today so no more mustard greens for six anymore sorry Sixx
     
  14. bradyloach

    bradyloach Elite Member

    :( Not good! Didn't know they can see red light :(
     
  15. rosi92

    rosi92 Subscribed User Premium Member

    you could use an under tank heater. it would help with night time heat as well as the hot side during the day.
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Mustard greens are fine to feed!
    They are one of the big three greens for folivores and omnivores along with collards and turnip greens.
     
  17. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Mustard greens are fine...in careful moderation. They are not fine serving as staple greens (re. primary ingredient used in high percentage every day). The same applies to Turnip greens. The problem is a lot of people read caresheets and focus in on one dietary component and decide to use that component as a primary staple item. If someone uses mustard greens and or turnip greens as primary staple items they are putting their reptile at risk due to their relatively high levels of vit. C, oxalates and giotrogens. This is why I believe high quantities of these food items should be avoided. YMMV.
     
  18. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Variety is the spice of life:)
    What does YMMV stand for?
     
  19. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Apologies, Michele, it's an acronym for 'your mileage may vary' :) In other words your experience may differ.
     
  20. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Actually they are, and have been, for generations of captive animals. And it has nothing to do with simply reading a caresheet. It has to do with generations of the animals being raised, studied and cared for. Not just by pet owners but vets, and rehabbers.
    While I would never recommend that a single variety of greens be used by itself, in combinations they are fine. One of the things which is looked at is the calcium to phosphorous ratios. The recommended greens being high in calcium.

    While most everyone will agree that the key to good diet for any animal is variety, the aforementioned greens are a great staple to build that diet on.
    While being aware of oxalates and giotrogens is a good thing, their presence alone should not put you off of recommending a food.
    And while you are correct that vitamin A in its true form can be overdone. If it is in its betacarotene precurser, the animal only metabolizes what it needs.
    As for vitamin C, its water soluable and is eliminated from the body.
     
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