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Homegrown Bearded Dragon Greens

Discussion in 'Bearded Dragons' started by jdandlucy, Jul 31, 2013.

  1. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    I have been having no luck searching the net for the info i would like. So what better place than to ask here. i would like to start growing my own greens for my 2 bearded dragons to save some $. i would like a few of the normal greens, kale, collards, and parsley. what wild type of greens can i grow as well. i know clover, and dandelion. anything else that you know of, like plantain, or chickweed.
     
  2. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

  3. mayhmmaydn

    mayhmmaydn Elite Member

    check into the flowers that you can grow too!
     
  4. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    *nods* many great flowers! Thanks for bringing that up May - great point
     
  5. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    i grow dahlia already, they love the flower pedals. i just would like to have a good green indoor garden for them when winter hits and everything go sky high as far as price. i can grow anything indoors or out, but with my luck i will not be able to grow the weeds i want. dandelion seeds are readily available, i have kale, parsley, and rosemary seeds. is plantain(not the green banana) safe? i used to feed it to my rabbits and hamsters when i was a kid but that probably has little relevance to beardies.
     
  6. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    I dont know if plantain is safe, I have never tried it? But I grow wheat grass, clover, alfalfa, oat, and barley seed in the house all year around. They are small, pretty and honestly don't take a great deal of room honestly. The nice thing about them is they are natural foods. Like the wheat grass? You use it at 2-3 inches tall and that doesn't take long honestly. Oh I should mention if you have dogs/cats or both? They will eat it too :) I am not sure of other places, the place I linked is the only place I have ever used and I really like them.
     
  7. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    thank you tigerivy. i will look in to the wheat grass and the others you mentioned.
     
  8. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    I have compiled a list of weeds, wild plants and garden plants that Bearded dragons can safely eat. It has taken some time to cross reference them with those found in Australia, and weeds that are poisonous and those that can be found easily in any area. If anyone is interested in trying their dragon on this diet and needs a picture to identify any weeds I will do my best to help. Also if there is any weed you are not sure of, take a photo and I will try and tell you if it is the correct plant.

    Cleavers. Known as Sticky weed
    Mallow, leaves and flowers
    Knapweed
    Blackberry
    Dogrose
    Bindweed
    Honey suckle flower
    Ox eye Daisy
    Sow thistle
    Dahlia
    Pineapple weed
    Chickweed
    Gazinea
    Verbena (garden only, not shrub type)
    Saxifrage
    White clover
    Red clover
    Alslike clover
    Crimson Clover
    Chicory
    Hedge mustard
    Garlic mustard
    Evening primrose (not primula)
    Plantain, ribwort and slender
    Lemon Myrtle
    Nasturtium
    Nettle
    Smooth sow thistle
    There are many more edible plants but these are the ones that are found in Australia.
     
  9. TigerIvy

    TigerIvy Elite Member

    wow nice list thank you!!
     
  10. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Just because a plant species and animal species are native to the same location it doesn't mean animals eat or should be fed said plants. For instance, plantain is an extremely poor food item choice for a bearded dragon (and most other reptiles). Not only are plantains high in sugars but they also contain high amounts of oxalic acid (oxalates). Also, while not native to Australia, kale should be highly limited or avoided entirely as it contains a fair amount of oxalates AND is extremely high in goitrogens. The very same applies to parsley (high oxalates). Collards, while better than the aforementioned items, are not great either since they (and most other species in the brassica genus) are moderately high in both oxalates and goitrogens. While these items might be fine in moderation it would be wise not to use them daily or in high amounts over long periods of time. With that said I would suggest researching chemical compositions and nutritional value before implementing any food item in an animal's dietary regimen.

    As far as what you could try that hasn't been mentioned yet, check out opuntia cacti, winter squash varieties, curly endive, escarole as well as long grasses, like timothy and or orchard grass.
     
  11. B3ll3

    B3ll3 Elite Member

    I wish I could grow stuff but we have WAY too much wild life here that would eat it in a heart beat :(
     
  12. mayhmmaydn

    mayhmmaydn Elite Member

    even items on the occasional use because of higher oxalic acids can be fed a little safer if they are YOUNG leaves. the only thing to research on that then is the phosphorus. Chicory for example if picked young has safer levels of the acid than the older leaves but you have to adjust for the phosphorus levels. Chicory does have the same family as escarole and endive in it . :)
     
  13. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Yes, plants contain varying levels of nutrients and compounds throughout different growth stages. In addition soil content is also a determining factor. The key is determining these things.
    Since you brought it up I think it's important to note that common chicory (often confused with or labeled as curly endive by many people/markets in the US), escarole and curly endive (Cichorium sp.) are all moderately high in oxalates however, unlike many other commonly recommended staples, they do not contain any other potentially detrimental compounds, like high amounts of phosphorous or goitrogens. This is why some, including myself, prefer these greens over others, specifically those within the Brassica genus (mustard, turnip, collard greens, bok choy etc).
     
  14. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    so i am getting miss information from everywhere including this site. when i got my bearded dragons in december i had asked what foods could be fed on a regular basis. just about everyone who chimed in said kale collard turnip parsley for their greens. i have been feeding my dragons since i got them in december mainly Kale collards and parsley.
     
  15. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    And a lot of people will continue to give you that advice (and that's fine, I won't argue). IMHO those food items are not great staple items based on the information out there. Now it's up to you to make a decision as to what you think is best for your animal(s), but before you do check this out and be sure to do some in-depth research on nutritional values of each dietary item you're thinking of using.
     
  16. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    thanks vers. From your knowledge what are the best greens to feed my bearded dragons.
     
  17. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Personally, as far as vegetable matter is concerned, I would lean towards what I mentioned on the first page in addition to dandelion, edible flowers (esp. hibiscus) and fresh alfalfa, since beardies can handle a more protein in their diet (compared to uros) but the Ca:p ratio isn't always the best. While you can't grow it you could also try mazuri tortoise pellets. In the end I'm not totally against certain greens--You can certainly toss some collards, mustard and turnip greens in every now and again, but I personally would not use them as staples given the fact that they are both goitrogenic and moderately high in oxalates. I also would generally avoid fruit all together since I just don't see the benefit. YMMV.
     
  18. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    i have not given my dragons any fruit in a few months. thanks again vers
     
  19. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    one more thing. the plantain i am referring to is not the fruit, but rather a plant. their are to types found locally. one is common plantain, the other is ribwort plantain. they can be made in to herbal teas for humans, the seeds are a good source of vit B1
     
  20. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    No problem, but remember its just my .02...in the end you need to go with your own gut and, more importantly, your brain. As far as plantain thing goes, thanks for clearing that up. I'm on my phone right now, which isn't exactly the best tool for 'in depth' research, but I did find one interesting fact in regards to the seed of the ribwort variety...apparently its a rather effective laxative. In the five or so minutes I looked, other than folk medicinal uses, I couldn't find anything on chemical composition or nutritional value of the leaves, plant or flower itself. With that said the proof is in the research. Pick a possible food item, punch it into Google and have a go at it. Get your nutritional bullet points in order and put it through the ringer.
     

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