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Help! Lost Python!!!

Discussion in 'Pythons *General*' started by kellykoster, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. kellykoster

    kellykoster New Member

    So, I just bought a house... I find out right before moving in that the previous owner, my sister, lost her python in the house right before she moved. So my question is HOW DO I FIND IT? I live in Nebraska and it is going to start getting cold and I dont want the poor thing to die! He is 3 maybe 4 feet? How big of prey could he take or would he try to take if really hungry? Basically I need to know if my cats and moluccan cockatoo are safe? Am I safe? I have looked and looked and unfortunately there are tons of places he can hide. If he is in the walls or ceiling of the basement (where his cage was) how do I lure him out? Also if he got outside... I dont even want to think about that... he could be ANYWHERE! I am not scared of snakes, but I am nervous for people and pets in the area! If he finds a place to hide and prey he could be HUGE by the time I find him... or he finds me! Help!!!
     
  2. CRRL

    CRRL Elite Member

    My first place to look is in the couch cushions.
    Otherwise, place a bowl of water in the middle of the room.
    Sooner or later it will seek out water.
     
  3. Ieasa

    Ieasa Elite Member

    YOU are safe! A ball python will not get big enough to prey on humans ever. Your pets? Maybe.....depends on his size really. I don't think my 3 ft ball would not go for my cat because she is pretty big for him but if he was hungry enough he might try. He eats medium rats. So depending on how big your bird is......maybe. but keeping the bird properly contained should keep it safe.

    You might set out a heat pad on low next to a water bowl in the open. Perhaps he will seek it out.
     
  4. norwegn113

    norwegn113 Well-Known Member

    I have heard of people using flour sprinkled lightly on the floor to see if it comes out at night. If it does it will leave a trail for you to follow. Also you said last known spot was in the basement. Check around hot water heaters furnaces etc. Chances are you will find them near some sort of heat source, especially ball pythons. They have heat pits custom made for finding heat! BTW you are safe. Keep an eye on your birdy though. Might want to keep it in its cage until snakey is found. Tweety would make a nice little snack.
     
  5. Poison

    Poison Elite Member

    Never said it was a ball python.

    A 3-4ft ball python may try and eat the bird if it gets hungry. me even try and eat the cats though it may not succed. At that size you are safe. Cant say the same for your pets though. Just keep the birds locked up if you are not watching them.
     
  6. Ieasa

    Ieasa Elite Member

    Oops. I guess I read 3 or 4 feet and my brain just connected that with ball python. Sorry. Either way at that size I do not believe a human is in danger.
     
  7. CRRL

    CRRL Elite Member

    I would agree. The rule of thumb is one adult human per 5 foot of constrictor.
     
  8. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    a lot will depend on which species the lost python is.

    In my experiences, snakes that escaped their cages did not wander far, and most never leave the room. They will seek out tight places, including heat ducts, under or behind appliances, and such. Even if places are potentially dangerous (such as the pilot light areas of gas appliances)

    While a Ball python couldn't eat a cat (unless it was a very large Ball, and a very small cat) it could certainly do some potentially lethal damage in an *attempt* to do so. If it is a larger species, and still young, it will likely get hungry enough soon, to venture out in search of food. My advice for now, is to keep the basement secured. If the snake is there, don't make any opportunity to escape. Keep the basement door closed - locked if possible, don't let your other animals down there, for their safety, and make sure ventilation ducts throughout the house are covered securely to prevent it traveling throughout the house that way.

    Most snakes are nocturnal. Try sitting in or near your basement at night (dim or no lights), and simply listening for moving things. You might just get lucky! With many snakes, when they are moving around, and encounter a tight space, their first impulse is to just push harder. Often time, things will give, and they will just slither through, but sometimes, that may make things shift, or tip over, and give away their location.

    One of my Ball pythons escaped his cage once (broke it, actually) and while we did not see it happen, we had no problems following his "trail of destruction" the next morning. All the things he had tipped over, and moved, were very apparent. and he was less than 3 feet long.
     
  9. Poison

    Poison Elite Member

    I'm gonna have to highly disagree with that rule. Who made that rule?
     
  10. CRRL

    CRRL Elite Member

    Professional experience.
    It's a generel rule of thumb for our staff's safety.
    We are a rescue, our animals have been abused and neglected, they are very unpredictable.
    I doubt that very many pet snake owners could handle a 7 foot ****ed off green anaconda.
    We have to handle them to treat and care for them. They are not pets.
    With that said, any large constrictor can turn on you in an instant, you are responsible for the outcome.
     
  11. Poison

    Poison Elite Member

    A 5 foot burm or boa and most large constrictors are still pretty slender and Imo can't cause much harm. What personal expearience have you had that made you determine that a 5 foot constrictor is dangerous? A 7ft snake and a 5 ft snake can be very different as far as girth go's. I have seen very large 7ft boas and burms so I would agree to that rule.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013
  12. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    My rule of thumb when I rescue snakes is 1 pair of hands per 6 feet of snake. It is generally accepted that a person is relatively safe from snakes of ALL sizes as far as being eaten. However, a large constrictor is quite capable of killing a grown person. Since I have no clue as to the type of "python" you are trying to find, and how long exactly it has been kissing, it is kind of difficult to help with anything other than generic advice. You can put a prey item into a cage with a hole in it just large enough to allow the snake in and not out after it eats the prey item. You can also sprinkle flour in the floor as has been mentioned and check under the refrigerator and any other areas that may generate any type of heat. That is most likely where you will find it. If there are any areas where there is natural sunlight you may find it there. Dark closets are a good spot to look into also. I found one of my escapees in between my wall and my dresser...he was wedged in so tight I had to move the dresser to get him out. Good luck on finding it.
     
  13. CRRL

    CRRL Elite Member

    Potentially dangerous.
    Irresponsibility and poor handling are why bad laws against reptiles are passed.
    Personal experience? Are you serious?
    I'm not even going to justify that with an answer.
     
  14. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    My rule of thumb when I rescue snakes is 1 pair of hands per 6 feet of snake. It is generally accepted that a person is relatively safe from snakes of ALL sizes as far as being eaten. However, a large constrictor is quite capable of killing a grown person. Since I have no clue as to the type of "python" you are trying to find, and how long exactly it has been kissing, it is kind of difficult to help with anything other than generic advice. You can put a prey item into a cage with a hole in it just large enough to allow the snake in and not out after it eats the prey item. You can also sprinkle flour in the floor as has been mentioned and check under the refrigerator and any other areas that may generate any type of heat. That is most likely where you will find it. If there are any areas where there is natural sunlight you may find it there. Dark closets are a good spot to look into also. I found one of my escapees in between my wall and my dresser...he was wedged in so tight I had to move the dresser to get him out. Good luck on finding it.
     
  15. Poison

    Poison Elite Member

    ummm ok?

    I asked "who made that rule" and you said "personal experience"
     
  16. Ieasa

    Ieasa Elite Member

    Poison it seems you may be misreading. I don't quite get what your disagreeing with. CRRL said "rule of thumb" is 1 person per 5 feet of python....seems like what that means is 1 person can likely handle a 5 foot python and 6 ft of python would be better day dealt with 2 people. Also CRRL did not say personal experience. It reads professional experience. I have heard similar rules of thumb from several resources so it can't be totally off.
     
  17. Ieasa

    Ieasa Elite Member

    Wait constrictor....not python.
     
  18. CRRL

    CRRL Elite Member

    Vey well said, most people have little difficulty understanding this.
     
  19. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I would also agree with this. While a 5-6 foot boa or python could not eat you. If it gets in the right situation it CAN kill you!
    That's one of the tings that makes me crazy seeing novices walking around with a large constrictor wrapped around their necks! DUH!
    Its a wise choice to ALWAYS have backup when dealing with any boid that size.
     
  20. mshrmheadcharge

    mshrmheadcharge Moderator Staff Member Premium Member

    Poison, every experienced snake keeper knows this rule of thumb. It's not something CRRL just made up.
    Lol. It's funny that you question experienced keepers about the rules they follow to keep themselves and others safe. Not handling a 6ft boa alone is what I consider responsible and smart.
     

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