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Can't Get Anoles To Eat

Discussion in 'Anoles' started by Jaymin Sabean, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    I have two Green Anoles, male and female, that I got 3 days ago. I have put in crickets and mealworms, however they will not go after them or eat them. I mostly give them crickets, but when they didn't work I put in mealworms, but they didn't eat them either. Any tips on how to get them to eat? (Also, o know I have the wrong UVB light, I am going to get fluorescent tube lighting soon)

    Thanks, Jaymin Sabean
     
  2. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    By the way: I have sphagnum moss and plantation soil on the bottom. I have vines and a big tree all throughout the terrarium. I can't find out how to add a picture from my gallery here, but that's the best I can do.
     
  3. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    The most probable reason they aren`t eating yet is stress (the new environment) you must give them time to fully acclimate to the enclosure, at this time not eating is of no great concern (but obviously worrying to you).
    Any changes you make to the environment (even necessary ones) will have some effect on behaviour. The most important consideration just now is getting the temps and humidity within the recommended ranges and letting them settle in.
     
  4. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    Alright. I should probably just leave them alone then. Thanks.
     
  5. iRene

    iRene Elite Member

    The best thing to do is leave them alone as much as possible. Do not be changing their food. Put something the crickets will eat in the cage and the anoles will hunt when they are secure. Mealworms can be put in a small dish with a bit of carrot. It is better to just leave bugs in with food than constantly switching.
     
  6. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    I'll do that, thanks. Will the crickets and mealworms stay in the same spot as their food is at? Because I'd like to know if they've been eaten or not. And what size crickets should I feed them? I find there is a varied opinion about that.
     
  7. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Can you show a photo of where in the enclosure you leave the food dish (obviously crickets are likely to move freely) I`m asking because it`s best at this time to leave food close to cover rather than out in the open. The lizards should be able to swallow the prey quite easily, but I don`t know the actual sizes in comparison to the lizards?
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2017
  8. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    I never put a food dish in there, Because I never thought they'd go on the ground to eat from it. Instead I used a part on my tree.
    1514742053838481993921.jpg
    That's where they hang out usually. I have a carrot for the mealworms, cricket food as well, and water gel for the crickets to drink.
     
  9. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    Once my Anole walked right on top of a cricket, and the cricket walked on top of them, but they didn't bother eat it.
     
  10. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

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    Personally I would wait at least a couple of days before even offering food. Did you cover the whole top, and what are the temps and humidity right now?
     
  11. AmityReptiles

    AmityReptiles Well Established Member

    Hey I just want to make you aware, it's fairly dangerous to keep water gel in a reptile enclosure. The gel dries up into granules or a smaller glob, and then is sometimes accidentally ingested by the reptile. Once inside, it again swells and will suck the moisture out of the reptiles insides and cause a massive impaction. If you must provide cricket water inside an enclosure then use a slice of cucumber or some fruit!
     
    murrindindi likes this.
  12. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    Wow. Thanks for that, I will remove it immediately.
     
  13. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    The whole top is covered, the only spot that is left uncovered is right underneath where the light shines. My humidity now is usually 65%+. I always mist if it gets under 60. My hot side temps are 85° once warmed up, my basking spot temps are 93° (with many surrounding perches for them to find out where they like it), my cold side temps are 75°.
     
  14. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    What do you mean, once it warms up? How long does this take?

    And your crickets should be as long as the width of the anoles eyes.
     
  15. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    By warming up I mean that, lets say during the night it was 70°, I turn the lights on at 8:00AM, and the basking spot doesn't instantly turn 90° as soon as I turn them on. It takes a couple minutes.
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Ok thanks for clearing that up. I sometimes deal with people trying to use heating devices that are not sufficient and it takes hours to heat up.
     
  17. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    oh, okay.
     
  18. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    You can put small mealworms and crickets with the back legs removed in a bowl and the anoles will eat them.
    You're right that they won't stay on the ground but they'll jump down, grab one, then go back up to eat it.
     
  19. Jaymin Sabean

    Jaymin Sabean Active Member

    This morning I watched three crickets come out of a little hiding spot right in front of my Anole, and she ignored them completely for some reason. They have been thriving in the tank for two days now,.
     
  20. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    Again, they're probably still adjusting. I understand it can be frustrating when a new pet won't eat but this is common for reptiles.
    I've had tons of anoles in the past. Some ate the very first day I got them, some waited a few days, some waited a week, but they all ate when they were settled.
     

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