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Bearded Dragon Cage Doors - Cage Size: Sub Adult

Discussion in 'General Construction' started by Mark, Jan 13, 2007.

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  1. Mark

    Mark Elite Member

    What is YOUR preference on door openings for a cage -- swing open or siding glass type?

    I have also seen that many suggest keeping young dragons in a smaller cage/tank before the jump to a full 5x2x3 cage. Is there any relevance to this idea?
     
  2. Colleen

    Colleen Elite Member

    I'm no expert but the cage the students made for my beardies last year have framed glass doors that swing out, so I can get inside to clean. My cage is 2' deep x 4' long x 2' high. I used peel and stick tile on the floor to make clean up easy. The enclosure is all wood with the exception of the doors and a screen area on the top for the heating and basking equipment. Hope this helps.
     
  3. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Although sliding doors would look nice, the swing door makes the whole tank accessible and easier to clean as Colleen said :)
     
  4. BRIZZY

    BRIZZY Banned User

    I will have to agree with marsha on this one!!
     
  5. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Swing open also gives more opportunity for photos. Sliding doors have always been a bit of a pain for me. There was always substrate getting stuck in the track. Even one I built 4 inches above the substrate. It still got tracked in there.
     
  6. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,

    I too say swing doors.
     
  7. MoogleBass

    MoogleBass Kittes are so nice! Premium Member

    Sliding doors.

    They would make it easier to clean to me. Make the top track about 3 or 4 inches deep so you can push the glass up and pop it out. The thing i found with swing doors is strain. But then again mine swing down, would like to make sliders. but oh well.
     
  8. rbl

    rbl MacGyver in real life

    True! It's a pain to clean and access the back with sliding doors and sometimes taking a picture can be quite challenging but I still prefer sliding because 95% of the time I need to do something else than that.

    With sliding doors you can easily access each side without exposing the other. This is good for your animal safety (your beardie won't fall or get stuck on the other side) and less prone to accidents (the doors don't slide on their own and a swing door can be open if something heavy applies enough force to it, like a basking log falling on the door).

    Sliding doors are also more energy efficient because you only open what you need and they also allow you to safelly place a grid if you need to cool down an enclosure.
    Last but not least, they will fit any place and swing doors won't.
     
  9. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,

    Ricardo made a good point I didn't mention. While I prefer swinging doors, they should have latch locks, or some sort of locking mechanism so they don't open accidentally.
     
  10. Colleen

    Colleen Elite Member

    Mine have a simple hook and eye that keep them closes and they swing out, meeting in the middle.
     
  11. Mark

    Mark Elite Member

    I guess because of the size I have been working with I never thought of making it such that one door holds the other closed. Now that a new idea for my dragon cage has crushed my mind I think that swinging doors are the only ones that will look right.

    Any opinions on the second question in this thread -- cage size for a young. Why buy a second cage if I know it will only last for less than a year? I see people mention 20 gallon long style fish tanks but I as I see it a thermal gradient and proper UV with a MegaRay would be difficult to do.
     
  12. rbl

    rbl MacGyver in real life

    Oops! Missed that!

    Yes, there is relevance in that idea. The problems that may arise from that are related to stress and safety.
    If you redecorate the enclosure as he grows, adapting it to his size, then you won't have any safety issues because he won't jump from a log several times his height or drown in a "huge" water plate. Nevertheless young beardies in large enclosures will often stress if there aren't enough hides because they feel exposed. But adding more hides will just create more places where the crickets can hide from him and you don't want loose crickets in the enclosure at night. Of course you can feed him in a separate box and bypass this problem.
     
  13. venus

    venus Founding Member

    Perfectly said Ricardo! :)
     
  14. rbl

    rbl MacGyver in real life

    Thanks =)
     
  15. Kilo82

    Kilo82 New Member

    The cage i am planning on building will be, 5x3x2 with two little swinging doors to change water and food. Stationary glass in the front and a hinged top with the lights mounted to it. The only thing im not sure about is how much air flow do i need?
     
  16. iam_a_legend06

    iam_a_legend06 Well-Known Member

    mine is 5ft 2ft 3ft and sliding door with the glass easily popped out still means you can easily access all area of the cage
     
  17. rbl

    rbl MacGyver in real life

    Kilo82, as much as you can get. Ventilation is the last thing you want to sacrifice.

    Mark, as for the slide vs swing doors debate, don't forget you can have both. It will be a little more expensive but if you must, you can have it!
     
  18. tekknoschtev

    tekknoschtev Member

    I think it also needs to be said that location plays an important role in the debate between sliding versus swinging. In the intance of my ex's bearded cage, she could have opted for swinging doors, because space wasnt a huge issue, but she felt that aesthetically and safety deemed sliding was better.

    [​IMG]

    Photographing the little jerk can be a pain in the butt with the sliding doors, because he always seemed to like to be infront of the one that was closed :p But aside from that, we both felt that it provided enough access to the enclosure without leaving the entire enclosure vunerable.

    That said, my brother and I are going to be redoing his bearded's cage, which currently only has top access.

    [​IMG]

    I can offically say that while having top access is nice, only having top access is a pain in the rear, especially once the enclosure was elevated off of the ground. In his bearded's new enclosure, we purchased a curved piece of glass with frame for the front (similar to a display case at a grovery store) and the entire thing is going to open upwards with the aid of gas-struts (similar to the deck lid on a car). This will provide nearly 100% access to the cage without a frame at the top to make it difficult to maneuver around in.

    I'll have to scan the "blue prints" we have drawn up to illustrate what I'm referring to.

    But in the case of my iguana's enclosure (I know, not a beardy but bear with me) swinging doors simply weren't an option. Due to the size of the doors, and ammount of access I needed/wanted to the encosure, and various other obstructions, sliding doors were the only choice.
     
  19. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Hence the importance of the planning stage before building anything. There are many considerations to consider before deciding on swinging or sliding.
     
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