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Any Downsides To Owning A Honduran?

Discussion in 'Milksnakes' started by Romeyrider, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. Romeyrider

    Romeyrider Well-Known Member

    Thinking of getting one. How many feet do males get? Are they nippy snakes? Do they musk a lot? Any other tid bits of information would be helpful. Thanks!
     
  2. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    I had a baby tangerine Hondo for a few months. I figure it was just one that wasn't destined to live. It was a bit flighty, typical of a baby milk snake, but didn't musk. Had a good appetite, then out of the blue it regurged a meal (live pinky mouse) and died about a week later. Most adults I've seen were around 4-5', decent size for handling and adults are usually pretty calm. A 30 gallon tank with a heat mat on one end is suficient, though a 40 breeder would allow a bit more space to move around.
     
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  3. Romeyrider

    Romeyrider Well-Known Member

    Thanks!
     
  4. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    Here's my current collection: 6.4 Dominican red mountain boas, 0.0.1 Jungle cross carpet python, 0.0.1 IJ carpet python, 1.1 BCI, 0.1 Everglades rat snake, 1.1 thayeri kings, 1.1 Elaphe climacophora, 1.0 fire bull, 0.1 Dumeril's boa, 1.1 Candoia paulsoni tasmai. Of the whole lot, I've found the baby bull snake to be the best all-around snake for handling. He's active during the day, and almost friendly when I reach into his tank. Likely has a lot to do with feeding him while handling, but unlike the BCI's he doesn't go ballistic with his feeding response. He will grow to about 6' and need a larger enclosure than the 30 gallon tank he's in now, but that's not a problem for me. Very low heat and humidity requirements, eats like a python (easily takes larger prey than most colubrids of similar size) and grows like a weed in a garden. The Candoia (Halamahera Island ground boas) are essentially miniature ball pythons. You can pick them up and they don't move. They do have higher humidity requirements, but don't need much space since they're not generally very active.
    P1060894_zpsh6yp2upr.jpg
    Not many snakes have such a well-balanced attitude and/or feeding response that you can trust to do this with. They're usually too flighty and worried about escaping handling, particularly when young, or get too excited and try to eat anything that smells like food, such as the nearby finger, before or after they eat the mouse:
    P1060882_zpsxpriur7b.jpg
     
    Romeyrider likes this.
  5. Romeyrider

    Romeyrider Well-Known Member

    Thank you for the detailed response!
     

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