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Amphibian for Beginner

Discussion in 'Amphibian - General' started by Dragoness, Dec 5, 2008.

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  1. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    Always looking to expand my collection - I currently do not own any amphibians.

    Any suggestions for a good one for someone who has negligible experience with amphibians?

    Kinda kicking the idea around of getting set up for dart frogs, as I have read that Dendrobates azureus and D. leucolmelas are particularly easy to care for.

    This project is a ways down the road - right now it's just curiosity.
     
  2. Frognut

    Frognut Subscribed User Premium Member

    Well the Gray's Tree Frogs are real easy to care for -- since a ding-dong head like me can do it. They are fun to watch but they are not frogs you can handle much. Mine still give me a good chase around the house when I feed them and I've been doing it for a few months now. (I bucket feed them to make sure everyone has their fair share). Since that is the ONLY time I handle them, you'd think they would catch on...;) Don't get me wrong, I love my Gray's but you are used to more interactive critters, so I'm not sure this would be for you... but you did ask for easy:p

    Now, I hear Whites Tree Frogs are relatively easy to care for and I have seen Liz's group of Whites and they are cool. They have such personalities and they will let you handle them. My son really wants a pair of them himself.

    I'll let the others comment on anything else - because once we get past these - there are some temperature/humidity/water issues, all of which you should be fine with -- but I'm still intimidated by it.

    The darts and the RETF's are all things I would like someday to move up to --- but I'm no where near that stage....
     
  3. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    You know, you ARE getting a tank that housed RETFs? ;)

    Whites are great for beginners if you want tree frogs. The hardest part of darts is culturing fruit flies. If you can get that down, you are golden.

    If you are looking for something ground dwelling, consider pacmans, pyxie, or tomato frogs.
     
  4. Frognut

    Frognut Subscribed User Premium Member

    It would not be wise to encourage me Liz... there is still one more show before Christmas...;) And then I would still need a bigger tank for Gretchen... hmmm I wonder if my husband would buy me one for Christmas:)

    And it's only hard to culture fruit flies if you want the kind without wings. Otherwise you leave a piece of citrus out on the counter and viola -- fruit flies. So many that you can NEVER get rid of them:eek: (I speak from experience - I could probably bring you a thousand just by walking past the compost bin with an open jar!) UGH!

    Hey - what's a Tomato Frog?
     
  5. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    Whatever amphibian i get I won't handle much (for their own good) I tend to regard them as a display animal.

    Can't darts eat pinhead crickets too? cause I already have those culturing...
     
  6. fire2225ems

    fire2225ems Subscribed User Premium Member

    I believe that most darts are too small for pinheads...
     
  7. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    could be. I know they have a thing for smaller prey than many other amphibians, at least compared to body size. Yeah, fruit flies would be a pain.
     
  8. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Actually, most can eat pinheads, but fruit flies are a better diet for them. :)

    Tomato frog.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    Maybe I'd be better off with something larger. There's just so many choices.
     
  10. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Also, think about an enclosure you would want to, and be able to build and take care of. Burrowing frogs are by far the easiest. Tree frogs are very fun.
     
  11. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    Of course. I'd probably go with a modified glass aquarium because they will inevitably need a wet space and/or high humidity depending on what I settle with.

    Maybe I'll go aquatic - I'm familiar with filtration in aquariums, so that would be something I already have a handle on.
     
  12. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Aquatic you could go for firebelly toads, budgetts frogs, salamanders or bullfrogs.
     
  13. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I gotta make up my mind.

    Budgetts frogs? as in the south American things that scream when upset? I didn't know they were available in captive trade.
     
  14. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Yeah them. They are REALLY funny.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    holy cow, I might just have made up my mind. He's adorable. Now for research. Got plenty of time though - no deadline. Just my own curiosity.
     
  16. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

  17. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    You HAVE to aestivate them?

    Is that one of yours? s/he is cute too!
     
  18. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    that doesn't sound so hard.... and the diet sounds pretty manageable too. I already have some spare 15 and 20 gallon tanks I could clean up and use. I need to rearrange things a bit first, finish up one project at a time. I'll hold off on the frog until I get this CWD cage taken care of.
     
  19. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    If you don't aestivate them, you will cut their life in half, maybe even down to a third. I don't own any. I have too many aquatic setups as it is. Maybe some day when my little toads pass on I'll consider it.
     
  20. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    once I have my CWD cage done, her old one (a 40 gal) can be revamped for a frog.
     
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