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Zoologists Unlock New Secrets About Frog Deaths

Discussion in 'The Library' started by Rich, Mar 26, 2008.

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  1. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    New research opens a bigger window to understanding a deadly fungus that is killing off frogs throughout Central and South America, and that could threaten amphibian populations in North America as well. The research underscores the dire circumstances facing up to 43 percent of known amphibian species in the world and points up the need for more regulations, conservation efforts and quarantines to prevent the fungus' spread.

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  2. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Re: Zoologists Unlock New Secrets About Frog Death

    This article sort of goes along with it. Its about the fungus "chytridi" which causes "chytridiomycosis" is easily treated in captivity. They have been now treating wild caught frogs with Lamical (OTC) diluted in water for a few treatments to kill the fungus. Lamical is used to treat athletes foot on humans, which is also a fungus.

    Deadly Frog Disease Is Spreading
     
  3. Typhanie

    Typhanie Elite Member

    Re: Zoologists Unlock New Secrets About Frog Death

    This really shows how delicate the natural balance is, and how essential it is that we don't bring in things like this that will run rampant on a native population.

    It's also kind of a grim reminder that the way we are doing things in the world right now, bringing in something that can wipe out a species like this fungus is becoming increasingly unavoidable.
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Re: Zoologists Unlock New Secrets About Frog Death

    Oh its quite avoidable! We just have to get over the mindset of "I want THIS,..NOW!" without regard to what it could do to the rest of the ecosystem.
    This sort of thing has been going on for decades and doesn't seem to have improved much.
    As the supposed "stewards" of the earth, we have done a really abysmal job!
     
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