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Will This Enclosure Work?

Discussion in 'Rainbow Boas' started by MudgeyWudge, Jan 3, 2012.

  1. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    I got a 4 foot tall, 2 feet wide and 2 feet long enclosure from a friend. I'm not sure what to put in it, and I was considering a rainbow boa. Would a tall enclosure work for one? Or do they need a long enclosure more?
     
  2. purplemuffin

    purplemuffin Elite Member

    That enclosure is perfect for one! :)
     
  3. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    They definitely like some height and will use it. Maybe just not all the time.
     
  4. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    Do you absolutely need substrate in the enclosure if you have another means for keeping the humidity up? I find substrate to be messy, but if they need substrate it would be alright.
     
  5. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    the humidity is the important part. If you can maintain is without substrate, that's fine. Substrate just happens to make it much easier. Trial and error, you'll figure out what you need.
     
  6. MadDog

    MadDog Elite Member

    I personally don't feel like it has enough floor space. It's only two feet wide by two feet long. It has a lot of hight to it, but I think it needs more floor space as well. That's just my opinion, however.
     
  7. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    Would taking it out for exercise help? How often is appropriate for handling? If that isn't a good option, I'd be willing to consider something else.
     
  8. Iggysmommie

    Iggysmommie Elite Member

    I think that once its old enough it may need more floor space, but I am just going off of what mine is like. Ophion doesnt really use his branches much but he roams the enclosure at night all the time. 2 feet is fine but I like more. As for the substrate it depends on the Boa as well as keeping up the humidity. Mine will not use a moist hide but once a week I wet down his substrate and he just loves to burrow in to it. I also spritz his enclosure a few times a week and it keeps his humidity at right around 80%.
     
  9. Flint

    Flint Elite Member

    Any way you could use the enclosure on its side or back? My rainbow is in a 4' wide x 2' deep x 1.5' tall cage, with 4-6" of shredded coconut husk substrate. He seldom climbs, he much prefers being on the ground and either in a hide or burrowed. Also the substrate makes the humidity much much easier to maintain. To maintain 85% or higher without substrate, I think you will end up with sanding water where it shouldn't be and a lack of ventilation. Both of those can lead to growth of unwanted organisms. The substrate helps by holding water without it being a stagnant pool, and letting it evaporate gradually. It will keep the humidity up and allow for a more ventilated cage. Also, if it gets dry on top, chances are it still damp underneath and your rainbow will burrow and stay happy and healthy. Trust me, low humidity can lead to a nightmare with a rainbow and quickly. I almost lost mine to pneumonia the first month I had him from low humidity.
     
  10. purplemuffin

    purplemuffin Elite Member

    Oh! I just realized I totally misread the post. Thought it was 4 ft long! Yes, can you turn it on it's side/back? Then it would work!
     
  11. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    It can't really work on its side. The door is plexiglas, with screen on the top for a light to go. It has wood shelves inside and is water sealed for humidity. My friend used it for her iguana until he outgrew it. If a BRB wouldn't do well in there, what would you suggest?

    Some supplies I have include a Mercury Vapor Bulb, 2 ceramic heat emitters, a rock cave (and I can get more hides pretty easily), water dishes, a humidifier, digital thermometer and hygrometer, reostat, a bag of wood mulch and some moss.

    For the size of the enclosure and all the supplies I have, what do you think I should get to put in it?
     
  12. Flint

    Flint Elite Member

    First things that come to my mind are arboreal snakes. GTPs, ETBs, ATBS, Barons Racer, Mangrove Snake, etc... All of those have been on my wishlist at one point or another lol. Question is what kind of animal are you ready for? I believe a rainbow would be much easier to care for than any of those I just listed. I don't know what your experience level is, so that would help make a better suggestion for you.
     
  13. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    I'm looking for something fairly docile, won't take up too much space, and is pretty hardy. I've tried my hand at Chinese Water Dragons but I haven't had much luck with them unfortunately. I've kept bearded dragons, leopard geckos, tarantulas, and anoles as well.
     
  14. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    I've been googling arboreal reptiles and I might be interested in a prehensile tailed skink. What can anybody tell me about them? I've been finding some contradictory info about enclosure size (one site said 3'x3'x5', another said 4'x2'x5') and I can't find anything about what their temperment may be like.
     
  15. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I did the same thing. Thought it was 4 feet long, not tall.


    Prehensile tailed skins will get a little longer than 2", and have the same rigid humidity requirements of a BRB to be healthy. They LOVE to climb, so the height would be good. As to their personality, it seems to be a crapshoot. I have worked with some that were quite docile, and others that would lunge at anything that moved in an attempt to bite. In general for cage size for lizards, the smallest dimension of the cage footprint should not be smaller than the total length of your lizard, including it's tail. For this cage, you do not want to get a lizard that will exceed 24" from the tip of it's nose to the tip of it's tail. Chameleons, or large arboreal geckos (Uroplatus fimbriatus look pretty amazing) could be a good consideration. snakes that are not strongly arboreal should have a cage at least 2/3 or more of their total adult body length. So this cage would work best for something strongly arboreal. Most arboreal creatures tend to need high humidity though. with any kind of ventilation on that cage (you mentioned screen tops) that can be tricky to achieve, and will take some trial and error.
     
  16. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    The top of the enclosure is only partially screen, just enough to place the lights on. It was custom made for a young iguana. I've done a little more research on my own, and I don't really think there's anything that will really go in there except a young iguana, young chinese water dragon, or some type of gecko. In the case of the former two, I'd have to build bigger enclosures for them later. As for the geckos, what would you recommend? I want something handleable and that won't hide too often.
     
  17. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    It could be an awesome crested gecko enclosure.
     
  18. MadDog

    MadDog Elite Member

    Depending on how much money you are willing to spend (you mentioned prehensile tail skinks), leachie geckos are pretty awesome... and expensive. They seem to be just as easy to care for as crested geckos. I don't have any personal experience with them, however. Tokay geckos are awesome as well, but they are usually pretty mean.
     
  19. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    Crested Geckos are awesome, but I'm scared they'd get lost in such a big enclosure :"> Where can I find Leachie Geckos? I've never heard of them.
     
  20. MudgeyWudge

    MudgeyWudge Member

    Well I did some research... When I read they were expensive (Leachie Geckos and Prehensile Tailed Skinks) I didn't know they meant $800 or $900! So I've decided to just sell the enclosure and use the money towards something else. I have both a 20 gallon tank and a 10 gallon tank. There should be a lot of different things I could put in either one, so I'm going to browse around and see what I can find. Will post updates, thanks everybody for your help :)
     

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