This Disappears When Logged In

Will Snakes Avoid Dart Frogs?

Discussion in 'Snakes - General' started by afkvivarium, Jan 8, 2017.

?

Which snake?

  1. Corn snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. Milk snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. King snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Bull/gopher/pine snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Garter/ribbon/water snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. coral snakes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  7. rattlesnake

    1 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. afkvivarium

    afkvivarium Member

    Hey guys! New to the forum :)

    So I visited the zoo recently and in their reptile house, I noticed they had 2 anacondas with a truck load of vibrant dart frogs, mantellas and toads. I knew the anaconda was smart enough to stay away, but their is still a risk involved. Even though frogs do lose their toxicity in captivity, consuming it is still harmful to most animals.
    So my question: can I do this with...
    A rainbow boa and dart frogs?
    California King Snake and Cali newts?

    Both will be given a large amount of space.
     
  2. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    Anacondas are simply too large to bother with frogs. Most snakes will happily eat frogs, dart or otherwise. The frogs get their poison from the insects in their diet in the wild, captive bred/raised frogs are nontoxic, and to a snake a frog is a frog. If it's a suitable size it will be eaten. Many, many years ago I found a spring peeper and put it into a 10 gallon aquarium with 2 small garter snakes, intending to get it back out again a couple minutes later, and keep the frog. In less than one minute one of the garters had the frog. I once tried feeding an Eastern newt to a garter snake. Eastern newts have a bad-tasting skin, and the garter snake did try to eat it, then spit it back out before it got very far down the gullet.
     
  3. afkvivarium

    afkvivarium Member

    Ok so I'm hearing no to the dart frogs and yes to the calis? And now that i think about it, a garter/non constrictor is probably a better choice than a king snake :)
     
  4. toddnbecka

    toddnbecka Well Established Member

    I'm nor familiar with Cali newts, but not all newts have the same bad-tasting skin as the Eastern (aka red spotted) newts. Adults of that species are mainly aquatic. Salamanders generally require higher humidity than snakes, and cohabitating with any snake species would likely be stressful for them. Would you want to live in one room with a man-eating whatever? lol. Seriously though, cohabitating is rarely a good idea, better to keep them separately.
     
  5. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    This is honestly a terrible idea no matter what combination, especially garter snakes with any amphibian.
     
  6. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Another thing. The handful of people who have successfully maintained a mixed species enclosure have two things in common. First they already have good working knowledge of the species involved. They don't just start tossing animals together and seeing if it works. And they are species from the same part of the world. Other wise you are exposing the animals to pathogen they would never come in contact with and as such have never developed immunity to.
    Second they are using large enclosures. Like zoo style. These are not small tanks.
     
  7. afkvivarium

    afkvivarium Member

    Yes I know that "mixing is a bad idea" but after seeing a ZOO do this, I should at least be curious to whether I can re-attempt this. And I have done my research on both species and MADE SURE that they often come face to face in the wild
     
  8. afkvivarium

    afkvivarium Member

    Yes I know that "mixing is a bad idea" but after seeing a ZOO do this, I should at least be curious to whether I can re-attempt this. And I have done my research on both species and MADE SURE that they often come face to face in the wild
     
  9. Qwerty3159

    Qwerty3159 Elite Member

    Yes the difference is that zoo enclosures are often gargantuan compared to what a hobbyist would have in theit home.
    Just because they come facr to face in the wild doesn't mean they should coexist in a small confined space in captivity.
    Mixing is not in itself a bad idea but it often seems kind of pointless of the risks are weighed.
    The mix you saw between the anaconda and dart frogs worked because the snake it simply too large to care about the frogs, much like how large sharks can be kept with small fish. There are certain combinations under certain circumstances that definitely work but none of the snakes you named should be housed with amphibians
     
  10. afkvivarium

    afkvivarium Member

    Ok thank you! I will definitely avoid this for now, but for the record, the zoo's enclosure was only max 10 ft by 4ft housing multiple snakes. If I ever do get to work with decorating a "shipping container" then I will take this into consideration again.
     

Share This Page