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Why Pet Stores Give Inaccurate Readings...

Discussion in 'Corn Snakes' started by Snoopie Melody, Feb 5, 2016.

  1. After reading all your informative reading on the threads, I was told that I did not need a heater. That the enclosure just needs to be room temp. My lavender ghost is 2 months old. I have a gas floor heating in which the encloser is near. I figured that be ok for Snoopie. Wrong...as I read... So I wrapped one side of the enclosure and bottom of enclose with my electric blanket until I get a heating pad...sigh...
     
  2. Buggy0123

    Buggy0123 Established Member

    Yes! Heating pads are a must, but make sure its a reptile one, not one you pick up at CVS. (a medical heating pad).
     
    Katsura likes this.
  3. Katsura

    Katsura Elite Member

    Please be sure to get a thermostat for your UTH as well. Left unregulated, they can get either too cold, or way, way too hot. Being cold won't help you and no one wants a cooked snake!

    EDIT it's a thermostat, not a thermometer. Huge difference; one reads temp and one regulates it. My mistake!
     
  4. Yes I will this is just temporary I would have purchased one and thermostat if it was required. Any purchase I specifically ask them about their care and needs. He doing well, move about the enclosure I won't handle him unless necessary for a week. I never had a snake so tiny. This is a first and am so happy that I had choosen a corn. I knew a couple that had bought 2 corns one 3 years ago and another 6 months ago from this store. These snakes are healthy. So when they gave me the instructions of no heat and lights I took their word for it.
     
  5. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Petstores often do not tell people everything that they will need for an animal. If people knew everything, they might not make the purchase.

    A classic case is the sale of green iguanas to people along with a 10 gallon tank to house it!
     
    Darkbird and Snoopie Melody like this.
  6. I agree many years ago I rescued a large iguana who sustained a leg laceration due to being in 40 gallon tank with 2 other large iguanas. He had the roam of the house but mainly remained in the corner when not up on top of fridge. Had him many years. Took him to vet and leg laceration healed up great..since I now live in New York it not feasible to have one
     
  7. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Well-Known Member

    Pet Store employees often mean well, but the more difficult an animal seems to keep the more likely people are not to buy them. I believe sometimes the pet store workers wish to make it sound easier and so do not give you all the facts. Also, they often do not know the proper way to keep animals, even if they enjoy them (particularly not the care of reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates).
     
  8. Thank you for your replies and it been 6 days and it has mites ...sigh... I put olive oil and let it sit on her for 15 min then washed it with dawn soap water then let it soak in warm water for 10 min.. I washed everything in cage with bleach. I only use paper towels for to cage. I called pet store manager says they checked reptiles every day but when I spoke to the person in charge she says they don't checked the ones hiding. I surely hope all reptiles there get treated... I hope I did this right and will do this daily. My question is could they get mites from frozen pinkies?
     
  9. GitaBooks

    GitaBooks Well-Known Member

    Thankfully I don't think that snake mites will live on a mouse, especially not a frozen one. However, Snake Mites readily will come in with other reptiles and so likely the whole store is infected with them.
     
  10. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    Your not going to get mites from frozen feeders, unless somehow they had more eggs on them, which shouldn't even be possible. You will however need to get something to treat the mites with, like reptile relief or provent-a-mite. What your doing will help get rid of some of the visible mites, but there will be eggs still in the enclosure. Get rid of all your substrate and use paper towels temporarily, clean the cage very thoroughly, and use one of the treatments above as directed on the packaging.
     

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