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Water Dragon Worries :(

Discussion in 'Water Dragons' started by cassicat4, Sep 3, 2012.

  1. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I would say he could eat pinkies now but try one first and see if he will actually eat it. It seems like he is tired of his food, but that is only my opinion. As in he tries one and decides they are boring and ignores them.
    When he starts climbing more he will be forced to use his leg and regain the muscle.
    As for the oil, they dont really have the abilities to expel any of the chemicals used if they were to injest it and the effects are as yet unknown but it could possibly cause alot of health issues depending on what they use in its manufacturing. Though the vast majority of mineral oils are organic, so it shouldnt be too much of an incident.
     
  2. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Hi, thanks for the info.

    Ok, so I offered him a pinky last night...it only took a few minutes of me making it dance in front of him before he gobbled it right up. So....is he just officially bored of crickets and mealies? I really don't know what else to offer. I've tried silkworms and hornworms, and he rejected those, I'm ordering in some earthworms and they'll be here in about 2 weeks. I think I'm just going to offer him one food item today, such as crickets, so he doesn't associate all the food with the boring food. If he doesn't eat any crickets, should I offer him another pinky tonight? I know when feeding pinkies I need to supplement with calcium, which I do have (liquid calcium carbonate from the vet). I'm just wondering how often I can feed pinkies to him, if he's taking them?

    As well, if dragons do get bored of their food choices...will they really starve themselves into sickness rather than eat something they really don't want?

    That makes sense about the leg. I'm going to try and have his new enclosure completed this weekend and get him moved.

    Ok, well the oil I got can be used orally for young children, and I didn't see any ingredients other than the oil itself, so I'll presume it's safe.

    Thanks very much
     
  3. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Yes they oils safe then, yes they will starve themselves I'll if they don't want he food offered (had 3 separate CWDs do this) . The upside to his is that after awhile of eating a different type of food they can be reintroduced to the old food and will like it just fine. Try fish for the next round.
    Also calcium supplements are needed wih insects and not so much with the mice or fish. Doesn't hurt to give it to them by the mice and fish have calcium already.
     
  4. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Ok, thanks, that's good to know. So what would I do if he's bored of everything offered? Let him go without eating for several days, and then hope he's interested again?

    As well, how long does it take for them to digest pinkies? As in, I fed him one yesterday, along with a butterwom, but he only passed the stool associated with the butterworm (it was quite small) today. He hasn't eaten anything today yet either - can a pinky keep them full for a couple days?

    Ok, I won't worry so much about the calcium then. What kind of fish can I offer? I've seen many conflicting things about how feeder goldfish are bad, rosy reds are good, minnows are bad, etc. etc. and it's mostly due to parasites they carry.

    Thanks
     
  5. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Goldfish are out they are disgusting and filthy. Rosy reds are best but the minnows work. It will take longer for them to digest pinkies as they are larger though I am unsure of the exact length of time. Been awhile since I have cared for a lizard that was large enough for pinkies but I think it was 2-3 days before I fed again...I don't remember though maybe someone else will chime in.
     
  6. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, pinkies are o.k as a treat, they are relatively high in fat, though not much calcium because the skeleton hasn`t formed, so you could still dust them. I expect the dragon would digest one in a couple of days or so.
     
  7. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Ok, thanks guys. Yes, he didn't eat today, but if it's going to take him a few days to digest then I guess that's expected. I gave him some liquid calcium too just because he really hasn't taken much in at all in the last week. He's also full-out shedding right now - all of him except that tummy patch is coming off, so if he didn't have eating issues before, I suspect he will now.

    I will try introducing fish in his new enclosure, which I'm really hoping to get him into this weekend. Pictures to follow soon.
     
  8. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Alright, another question - how healthy are butterworms? I tried offering mealworms and silkworms to him this morning, and he turned his nose up at both. I offered him one butterworm and he was all over it. I think the little twit is holding out! I normally only feed him one of those worms once every 2-3 days, and with the exception of one day, he's never refused them. I'll try and pick up some fish this weekend, but otherwise, I'm at a loss as to what to feed him because he's refusing his staple items and I don't want to load him up with reptile junk food! Ack!
    I've been holding back on crickets because I'm hoping to re-introduce them to him next week and see if he'll take to them.
    I have heard of a method of force-feeding where you stick a food item in their mouth when they're angry and gaping at you. I haven't tried it, and I didn't want to do it unless it became a last resort, but could this be effective in getting him to eat again?
     
  9. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi they are fine, quite high in calcium and protein.
    I don`t think trying to push food in their mouth when they are "angry" is a good idea, particularly if you deliberately try and goad the animal, it`s just stressful and will probably result in the prey not being swallowed anyway.
    If you can get the small fish don`t just drop them in a large dish of water and expect the lizard to catch them (though it is possible), better on a saucer, either live or f/k.
    EDIT: When you say you offered some liquid calcium do you mean you added it to the drinking water, if yes, best to just dust the prey with the powder form.
     
  10. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Ok, good, I was worried they were too fatty so I didn't feed them very often. Thanks.
    That makes sense. What would you suggest I try then, if he continues to reject all food (say including fish as well) except butters and pinkies?
    That's a good idea, I'll try that as well. Which fish are the ones who are notorious for having parasites?
    I gave him liquid calcium orally...he's very good at taking liquid when I drop some on his lips and he'll lick it right off. I dust all of his prey, but it seems like the dust has fallen off by the time he finally gets around to eating it. :p
     
  11. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Unfortunately if they refuse to eat anything but the reptile "junk food" yOu would need to feed them that and hope that after 2-3 days they will be able to be reintroduced to the healthier items. THis would be less stressful overall. As it stands feed him the butterworms and the rosy reds(which are a type of minnow). These are really he only type of fish to feed.
     
  12. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Ok, so update - it's been another week, and nothing has really changed. He had a couple days where he ate close to what he used to, several days where he would only eat one or two items, and a couple days where he wouldn't eat anything at all. I've been giving him pinkies lately (only two so far, in a 4 day span) as I know they're a bit fattier and appetite-wise, should tie him over for a couple days, and he took to them quite well. But now I don't know what to do. He's finished shedding, so the lack of appetite can't be attributed to that.

    Generally, he still seems healthy - he's usually bright green, active, hasn't lost any weight (but hasn't gained any either).

    I'm concerned he's sick and I'm missing the signs, but if he was, wouldn't he just stop eating entirely?

    My instinct tells me it's stress-related from being in a too small enclosure. I've been finding him up against the walls or hiding under his decor a lot lately. I wanted to have him in his new enclosure a week ago, but there were a bunch of setbacks and it's not quite ready yet. :(

    Suggestions? Advice? It's getting quite frustrating not knowing what's wrong.
     
  13. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    If it is an illness they stop eating when it's very far along. As in already severe. Can you get him to open his mouth for you to take a peak? If his mouth looks fine (no cottage cheese swelling or redness) then are his eyes swollen or closed?
    I don't think being in a small cage should affect his appetite to such a degree. But is there room in his current enclosure for more branches are reasrwnge his current branches to make them seem more fun?
     
  14. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Oh yes, I made him quite angry yesterday when I switched out one of his lights, and he was gaping all over the place at me - his mouth looks fine, no redness, no swelling, no cottage cheese substance. He doesn't snout rub, he just paws at the side of the tank.
    His eyes are always open when I check on him, and they're bright and alert, no swelling at all.

    Ok, I was just thinking if he was really stressed out from being in there, then maybe that would have a bearing. Hmmm, that's a good idea with his current enclosure. Now there are some branches he doesn't use at all, should I just remove those? I could rearrange a few things to see if that would help, but I know doing so stresses him out too - whenever I've done it in the past, he gets right freaked out and hides or runs around like a crazy lizard for awhile, or tries to escape out the top of his tank!

    I'm on the fence about whether a vet visit is in order...but what would they even look for? The vets I see are experienced with most reptiles, but water dragons are not that common and a lot of what they look for is knowledge derived from treatment of other reptiles. The drive is over 4 hours round trip, and I would hate to stress him out just to get them there and they say they don't know what's wrong, try force-feeding him. :(
     
  15. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Well if his mouth is looking fine and eyes aren't swollen i wouldn't bother with a vet visit. So I am stumped. It does appear he is tired of his current cage. Only other suggestion is just double time it on his enclosure and maybe you can get him in this weekend.
     
  16. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Ok, thank you. I've been working on it every night and am committing to having it done this weekend! And then I'm really really hoping that rectifies the situation.
     
  17. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi again, I can`t remeber if you`ve shown any more photos, or if it`s already be discussed, but you mention earlier in this thread the lizard had gained 20g quite quickly, maybe she`s gravid, do you have any pics taken very recently?
     
  18. cassicat4

    cassicat4 Subscribed User Premium Member

    Hi, thanks for reminding me - I do have recent pics, just haven't uploaded them yet. I will do so ASAP. From comparing pictures online and looking at my dragon, I think he's male, but I would love to have your guys' opinions on it as I've heard of many people with full-size adult dragons who were convinced it was a male and it turned out to be female. :p If he/she is female, can they be gravid before 2 years old (I remember reading somewhere that that's when they reach maturity)? I really have no idea what his/her age is - as per pet store, he'd be around 10-11 months, but based on his size, even using the guide on Tricia's Waterdragon Page as a general guideline, he should be at least over a year. Being WC though, I know it's anyone's guess. :p
     
  19. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I think it may be more about SV length than age as to whether they are sexually mature, and as captivity often means they grow faster than in the wild, they can obviously mature quicker too, so it is possible this animal if female might be gravid?
     
  20. diehardislanders

    diehardislanders Elite Member

    Yes, sexual maturity is determined by the size of the CWD. I think most reptiles are like this. Definately put pics up for us. Innapropriate enclosure size could definately cause a CWD to stop eating. I would get that ironed out as soon as possible.
     

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