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Wanted: Baby Sulcata or Cherry Head Tortoise

Discussion in 'Tortoises' started by Reptiles02, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. Reptiles02

    Reptiles02 Member

    Any one has any small guys for sale let me know thanks
     
  2. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Have you done research? There is a vast difference between the sulcata and the cherry head.
     
  3. pandorasbox

    pandorasbox Elite Member

    I saw this one posted for sale yesterday, it's in Indiana though. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=111718988988603&set=o.236992616413282&type=1&theater
    And yeah, make sure you know what you're getting into. A couple months ago someone had a ton of baby sulcutas for sale at a show and they are so freaking cute, but I started to look into the care requirements, and holy crap, definitely not for me. If I lived in AZ I would consider it, but the Midwest climate is not really suited for them at all.
     
  4. Reptiles02

    Reptiles02 Member

    I have several tortoise and which is 9-10" , they are awesome , just looking for babies let me know thanks
     
  5. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    So you have a sulcata and know how big they get?
     
  6. skelly98

    skelly98 Elite Member

    Scratch the sulcata thing. if you have one, make sure to read the care sheet at tortoise trust, and give it what it needs. If you can't, give it to a rescue. They are really not good pets imo, more something for zoos and very rich, longtime keepers. Any tort will need crazy hard care, and most die in captivity. make sure to do at least six months of research before getting one.

    sorry to sound preachy, but these things are waaay hard to care for and very fragile. That would be the precise reason why i do not have one.
     
  7. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I have two but I also live in as where they can be outside year round and I have sponsors and rescue agencies that have offered to help feed them. They require about 300sq ft or so as an adult and complex burrows. The burrows require that you dig out our yard and line t with concrete so they can't dig out of your yard.
    Their diets are complex and expensive. If the proper diet isn't offered hey end up looking like this: image.jpg image.jpg
    These are my two newest rescues and unfortunately the pyramiding can not be reversed.
    I ask that if you really want a sulcata do the research and start a garden before you get one.
     
  8. Reptiles02

    Reptiles02 Member

    Nice pair of them, must have a few babies
     
  9. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    Now im curious as to what their diet is. Also does the pyrimiding hurt them? Or affect their growth?
     
  10. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Yes it can. The shell of turtles or tortoises is made up of bone, the entire thing is one flat bone. On top of the bones are keratin plates, the plates protect the bone as well as morph sunlight to d3. Inproper shell growth can lead to mbd, renal failure, And weak bone structure in even the slightest amount of pyramidig. If the shell is shaped bad enough the placement of the organs is off and the tort has problem withdrawing into its shell.
    Examples: image.jpg this one was underfed and kept in a small tank with no lights. He had severe mbd, and undersized organs. Whether that was from them being squished by the shell or not developing right from the get go was unknown. He ended up dying shortly after being rehomed.
    image.jpg my desert tortoise has some slight pyramiding that was caused by too much iceberg and other produce when a baby (I take full responsibility for this and am very ashamed that I did not correct her feedings before she started to pyramid). This small amount won't affect her health any as long as she gets the proper diet and right amounts of calcium and UVB.
    This last one is sad and disturbing. It is a rescue from the turtle trust. image.jpg image.jpg this tort is soooo disfigured she can not feed herself. The plastron is morphed enough that she can not even move her head down to eat. She is hand fed and often times needs an Iv for nutrients. I keep calling it a her but the sad truth is that the shell is so wrong that the characteristics one normally looks for to identify the gender are missing.
    A proper diet would consist of 75% grasses (Either hay or yard grass) and 25% edible weeds, flowers, leaves. fruits and veggies arent that great for them but can be feed as treats. If you have a really large yard to plant the grass and weeds then feeding them is cheap.
     

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