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Vitamins for Insectivorus Lizards?

Discussion in 'Herp Health' started by DwarvenChef, Feb 5, 2014.

  1. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    As I sit here with way to much time on my hands...

    I've began wondering about different vitamin mixes out on the market. I already try to diversify my bugs to get as round a diet as possible but even that can have holes in the nutrient line up.

    How much does gutloading fill the gap?

    What vitamin mixes are being used in todays industry?

    What else can be done to fulfill our lizards (or any reptiles) diet?

    As anyone here probably knows a base diet of crickets is not healthy (live on bananas for a year??) so would gut loading alone be enough? I have a hard time swallowing that notion

    I would love to get a discussion up and running about our feeding habits in regards to insectivorous lizards :)
     
  2. DwarvenChef

    DwarvenChef Elite Member

    Starting off I feed crickets 75% of the time because it's all I can get on regular basis. I gutload with Rapashy bug burger and fresh vegies. Every month or two I get some wax worms for treats and keep the pupae to hatch out the moths for them. Now and again I will get meal worms but hate when they get loose in the tank and pupate... the beetles are a pain to deal with.

    I dust with calcium/D3 about once a week, seems I get nasal crusties of I dust more than that.

    On a side note my humidity is 55% in the day with the spots on and 75% when the lights go out. Misting daily and watering the plants weekly. I mention this as we all know dehydration can greatly shorten our charges lives and cause other nutritional issues.
     
  3. cbbrown

    cbbrown Active Member

    I have an insectivorus salamander, i was told on another forum for him if not feeding night crawlers, dust the crickets, mealworms,superworms, etc three times a week. I also gutload with fresh veggie scraps and commercial gutloading foods for crickets. He's grown quite a bit on this regimen.
     

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