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Vernal Pool Creatures

Discussion in 'Invertebrates General' started by GiftigeSpinne, Apr 12, 2006.

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  1. GiftigeSpinne

    GiftigeSpinne Elite Member

    I took a look in this little vernal pool infront of my house theother day and I found all kinds on water striders, these cool beatles that were diving into the water and scouraging around, and these little black things that were about half a centimeter to a centimeter long they were really skinney and had pointy tails that stayed on the surface of the water pointing up and they would rotate around on the same axis picking things off the surface, and they have a large black ball that stayed under the water. When they moved they would wriige around and do flips theya re quite strange does anybody have any idea of what these things are?
     
  2. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,

    They sound like mosquito larvae to me. If I saw them, I would destroy them. lol
    Mosquito larvae are normally found in any pooled water that is there for an extended period of time.
     
  3. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

  4. GiftigeSpinne

    GiftigeSpinne Elite Member

    yup thats them they are neat but I hate mosquitos. How would I go about anhialating them without hurting everything else the water effects???
     
  5. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    You can take a fish net and scoop them out.
    But if there are other pools in the area it pretty much a waste of time.
    If you know someone that keeps tropical fish,..the fish LOVE mosquito larvae. I used to keep a little bucket of water out back so they would lay eggs in it. Free live food. And I had enough fish that the bucket got emptied rather quickly!
    And if the pools dry up before they metamorphosize they will die anyway.
     
  6. iturnrocks

    iturnrocks Elite Member

    How little is this vernal pool? Is it large enough for amphibian breeding? or is it just a puddle. How often does it have water in it? and how long does it last before it dries up usually?
     
  7. Rich

    Rich Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Hello,

    Buy some little neons. They would have a blast eatting and attacking those things. Guppies would work pretty well to I presume.
     
  8. GiftigeSpinne

    GiftigeSpinne Elite Member

    The pool is about I would say 25 feet long and 10 feet wide and about 4 inches deep. It recently melted about two weeks ago and it evaporates in late summer. I dont think it will matter becasue my neighbors have one that is about 5x bigger than mine and they is a ton of marshy swampy land in the forest behind my house.
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    If you go down to a lakeshore, near teh edge you will see schools of small fish about the size of a guppy. These are gambusia, or Mosquito fish. They were introduced for the purpose of consuming mosquito larvae. Dip up a couple of netfuls of them and put them in your pool. It will take care of the larvae.
     
  10. Sean Boyd

    Sean Boyd Elite Member

    Mosquito larve.
     
  11. MRHickey

    MRHickey Elite Member

    betta fish love those things, I feed mine the stringy looking ones that always turn up in my little water garden in my duck pen.
     
  12. caudalis_sa

    caudalis_sa Elite Member

    you can also use a drinking straw and suck them out individually... but don't!
     
  13. The D

    The D Mango Empress

    EEEEEEEW! Dev that's grose!!!
     
  14. ajvw

    ajvw Subscribed User

    Hey, they're low carb and high protein...
     
  15. JMM

    JMM Elite Member

    If the water evaporates every year, drying the pool, you may try introducing some species of kili fish (I´m thinking of some Brazilian species - Leptolebias and Simpsonichthys). This is the tipical environment for them

    They´re life cicle is very short (a few months) - only when there is water available, of course. When the water is reduced, they reproduce, lay their eggs and die. When there is water again, the eggs hatch and a new generation arises, and is starts all over again

    They also resist huge temperature differences, so I think would be the best option for you.
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Introducing foreign species into the environment is not really the best choice of action.
    Not to mention highly illegal.
     
  17. caudalis_sa

    caudalis_sa Elite Member

    highly agreed!!!
     
  18. ajvw

    ajvw Subscribed User

    All this mosquito talk inspired me, and I went out to check the kiddie pool, which I left with water in it a couple of weeks ago in order to encourage baby skeeters. It was teeming with them, so I dipped out a bunch with a net to feed the baby salamanders (who have very fat tummies now!), then dumped to pool so the rest wouldn't live to bitin' age! Thanks for the inspiration, just in time!
     
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