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Venomous Reading

Discussion in 'General Venomous' started by peter84jenkins, Jan 10, 2011.

  1. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

  2. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Just finished with Night Hunting: Timbers
    Great read, felt like I was right there in your shoes! Thanks for sharing!
    Now I must read the next 2, :)
     
  3. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

    Thank you very much, it does me good to hear that!
     
  4. kaianuanu

    kaianuanu Elite Member

    that georgia black timber was a beaut.
     
  5. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

    Thank you. Georgia is often far from ones mind when one thinks of the "mountain" Horridus. Most of us think of New York or Virginia. Ours are just a beautiful.
     
  6. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Just finished the last two articles!
    Camp Serenity was awesome, i'm going to have to look up the area you traveled, sounds wonderful. One question, Why is there so much tin around? Well reading I imagined it was abandoned camps! Sound like the camp was a wonderful, freeing, relaxing, beautiful place to be. Liked the cave man thinking, too funny!

    I should be dead, was an amazing account of your near death experience all because you became lax with handling. A very humbling experience that I'm sure you will never forgot. A real life lesson, thanks for sharing with us. So why were you so against having a fasciotomy, were they worried that you might lose your hand because of the lack of circulation?
    One thing is for sure God was looking out for you, sad to hear of the man who lost his life!
     
  7. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

    Most of the tin in the south east comes from old home steads that have deteriorated over time and felled to the ground. These structures range from around the 1880s to the 1940s. My friend and I look for what we call "ghost" driveways, or paths cut into the woods off of old rural roads. We also get land owner permission to search through piles of ply wood or piles of tin they might have laying around, most of the time they oblige as long as we remove and relocate the venomous.

    Fasciotomy is fast becoming frowned upon in the medical community for the treatment of snake bites. There will be another article (I am not the author, but I am editing) concerning fasciotmy and snake bite soon. It was written by Dean Ripa, an expert on Central American pit vipers and envenomation. Ill post a link if you'd like.

    There was worry that the swelling would progress to the point of creating compartments syndrome, but several experts who were consulted during my bite adamantly disagreed with the Drs views, but I was scared and signed off on the surgery. I am very luck that the surgeon who did my surgery was a highly skilled re-constructive surgeon, so my scars are minimal. The largest scar is visible and tender at times.

    Thank you very much for the wonderful complements! There are a few more stories on my website under field notes www.georgiatimberdens.org
    Please enjoy and if you'd like, sign my guest book.
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I for one am pleased that you took the time to document your bite experience. It just goes to show that even the experienced can have an accident.
    I don't know how many times over the course of years I have been confronted with someone who has the attitude that they have kept a cornsnake for a few months and think THAT readies them to keep venomous snakes!
     
  9. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

    I agree. Being "prepared" to keep hots is not a matter of the number of snakes one has kept, or the variety of species whether they be aggressive or not; but it is more about ones mental preparedness. If you are someone who likes to research, read, learn from others and can adhere to a strict set of safety guidelines, then most likely you would make a good hot keeper. But it doesn't stop there every time you step into a herp room with hots you have to be ready for anything.

    In my opinion; just like a young lion learns the dangerous skill of the hunt from its more experienced elders, who time and time again bring home the meat, so should a new venomous keeper learn from the more experienced. Both are inherently dangerous activities, and both skills can be passed down through mentor-ship. I started with a mentor myself.
     
  10. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member

    Regarding the fasciotmony, here is the link to the article I spoke of. I did not write this one, it is by Dean Ripa, director of Cape Fear Serpentarium. I will warn potential readers that there are photos that are very graphic!

    Is Fasciotomy for You?

    This is a very informative piece and all venomous keepers, or those that field herp and encounter venomous should read this!

    Oh, thanks to the mod that posted the warning in my first post. I didn't think to do it.

    Thanks

    Daniel Duff

    www.georgiatimberdens.org
     
  11. gapeachkatie

    gapeachkatie Elite Member

    Thank you for the stories. :) I have experience with a couple of non-venomous, but I know I am no where near qualified for dealing with venomous snakes. Still, I hope there was more being done to inform people about them to prevent needless killing of snakes.
     
  12. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    Those stories were great, especially the 1st and 3rd! Terrifying experience in the 3rd! Makes me think harder about my annual excursions to my den site in central oregon... Every spring I go to catch the awaking western diamond backs, unfortunately I don't know how much longer I will be able to do this, as the local teen population has learned of its location and have been systematically killing off the inhabitants :(:( :(
    Here's some of the larger ones I've caught, very exhilarating! Your first story brought that feeling back for me :)
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    Gentle catch and release of course!!!

    Any input on a comparison between the Timber's venom potency and Western's venom potency?
     

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  13. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    That's so sad that the teens are doing that, isn't that against the law? I just get sick thinking about people harming animals:(
     
  14. gapeachkatie

    gapeachkatie Elite Member

    There are actually very few laws that protect species such as the rattlesnake... Even though they are being listed as threatened or even endangered in parts of the US, their "danger" level somewhat prevents them from being protected in the way they should be.

    As a side note, my only run in with a rattlesnake was at my brother's house while building a fence. Luckily, I was able to convince my family to just leave it be and change the location of the fence so it wouldn't enclose the boulders they obviously use, but it led to more work due to my brother's freak out led to wanting a mesh barrier two feet under the fence and a safety track... At least the work was for a good reason...
     
  15. Anthony14

    Anthony14 Elite Member

    Thanks for the stories, they are very informative. I am amazed at how under qualified the staff was to deal with your snakebite. I thought the hospitals we're more informed about treatment for bites.

    Also, Max you should do something to prevent those darn teens(I being one myself, see first hand what they are capable of).

    If I was in that situation I would make a fake sign on a wooden post saying no trespassing or area under surveillance, just to try to scare them off...It's worth a shot. :p
     
  16. peter84jenkins

    peter84jenkins Well-Known Member



    I can not speak so much regarding the western diamond back, but the timber rattlesnake has a broad spectrum of venom potency or lethality throughout their range.
    In some parts of their range you will see a strongly hemolytic venom, while in others, (particularly in Georgia) you will find that there are populations which posses neurotoxic venom.

    From what little I know of western diamondback venom I think it is a conglomerate of cytotoxins and hemotoxins and possibly myotoxins. However, I am not a toxinologist and so I could be wrong. Venom is not a uniform substance, not even within a species. It is highly complex.

    Sad to hear about the killings. Someone needs to step up against that.
    Any denning area should be protected, they are such delicate and vital parts to an eco system and it is easy to do a great deal of damage to a species by harassing them at an area where they commune in large numbers. It is akin to genocide.

    Oh, the pics are not showing up at the moment since I am using a work comp. Pics in threads don't show up sometimes.

    Daniel D

    www.georgiatimberdens.org
     

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  17. Max713

    Max713 Elite Member

    As he said, rattlesnakes are rarely protected, especially in the NW...

    I've thought of doing something like that before, although I don't live in that area anymore. Anything will have to wait until this spring when I go back for my annual trip.
    It's really sad, I first started going 3 years ago, my first year I caught 36 snakes over the course of an afternoon. Last year I only caught 14.... And we all know how hard it is to sway the teenage community, don't know if there's much stopping them, but it's worth a shot?
     
  18. Jarno

    Jarno Well-Known Member

    First of all;
    thanks for sharing this with us!
    can i copy these links to a dutch venomous snake forum?
    we are always interested in such articles!

    and 2nd dang dude those Timbers where very nice!
    gonna read them totaly when i have some more time

    greats
     

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