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Toadstool/Mushroom/Fungus in Enclosure

Discussion in 'HH General Discussion' started by jamesw, Jun 1, 2011.

  1. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    This morning when I went out to the garage, I noticed a new addition to my Tegu's cage. A toadstool had sprouted?? It had a white stalk with a black/gray/silver top. I am using a sand/soil mix for substrate, Temps 75-90, basking 105-115, humidity 65-85. It is a 8x3.5x3 wooden enclosure with double drop down doors. Any idea on what this is that sprouted and if it is harmful?? Also any way to prevent it from growing again?
     
  2. DimitrisDaisy

    DimitrisDaisy Elite Member

    For now, you could take all his substrate out and completely sanitize his enclosure and everything else in it. I don't know if it's harmful but better safe than sorry.
     
  3. LovetheBaruu

    LovetheBaruu Subscribed User Premium Member

    I think you need to change your substrate more often. Giving the substrate a good stir, between cleanings, will also help to refresh the soil.
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    When using organic material in a humid environment, things like that just tend to pop up. I would just remove it before it dumps a load of spores into the cage.
     
  5. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Its just a mushroom. Probably came in with the soil. Just scoop it out.
     
  6. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    Thanks for the replies.
     
  7. Rakoladycz

    Rakoladycz Elite Member

    If you are sprouting Mushrooms and fungus your humidity is too high or you don't have enough ventilation would be my guess.Decrease one or increase the other.
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Since mushrooms will sprout in a lawn out in the open I am not sure that you can say that.
     
  9. Rakoladycz

    Rakoladycz Elite Member

    Most mushrooms on average need about 85% moisture to grow. If you are growing mushrooms it is too humid.
     
  10. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I can guarantee you that the humidity in my front yard is no where near 85%!;) And I get fairy rings all the time!
    There are a lot of different species of mushroom. And they will have different requirements.
     
  11. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    How do people keep high humidity herps than?? Tree monitors, frogs, etc?
     
  12. DimitrisDaisy

    DimitrisDaisy Elite Member

    I clean out the tank often, provide ventilation (not enough to lose all humidity, but just enough to get a little fresh air), and I don't use any type of dirt or coco fiber, etc, as substrate. I keep my guy on paper towels and change them out when they get pooped on or get wet. Which means daily lol I only have had issues with fungus in my potted plants, but since I put earthworms in the plants, I no longer have so much of a problem with that.

    Edit: But I have a CWD who doesn't need substrate. For you, the case will be different since your herp needs something to dig in, correct?
     
  13. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    Yes he needs to be able to dig and burrow. I spot clean daily and this cage/substrate has only been in use about 3-4 weeks, so it can't be that a complete change is necessary. Could be a ventilation issue, I am going to add some vents and see what happens.
     
  14. Rakoladycz

    Rakoladycz Elite Member

    From Ehow dot com : Identification
    * Fairy ring is a fungal disease that lives in the soil and remains there for many years. Warm-season grasses are the most commonly affected by fairy rings. This condition occurs most often in the spring and summer, especially in areas that are very humid. According to the University of Florida IFAS Extension, there are three types of fairy rings. Type II fairy ring is used to describe brown spots in lawn grass with mushrooms growing in a ring.


    Most mornings I wake up and there is dew all over my lawn. :/
     
  15. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Mushrooms also like to grow on decomposing wood, a lot of people with new homes will have mushroom growing on their lawns from the wood that is left behind in the soil from clearing the lot!

    There could have been spores in the soil, lack of proper drainage will also create a perfect environment for mushroom to grow. Also often mushroom like dark areas and light may help!
     
  16. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    What we call "fairy rings" around here are simply circular groups of mushrooms. There is no browning of the grass.
    And my house was built back in the 40's, no leftover wood for them to grow on.
     

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