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Tads!

Discussion in 'Amphibian - General' started by AjaMichelle, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    So as we enter the summer months, our house becomes warmer and our herps become more active.

    This could mean that I might have some red-eye tree frog (Agalychnis callidryas) tadpoles in the near future (few months). All five of my frogs should be sexually mature and I have at least two possible females. With the increase in humidity and increase in food availability, they should be laying eggs.

    I have a five gallon pond in their enclosure that seems to be a good place for a handful of tadpoles to mature. It's rich in tannins, detritus, and clean.

    If I do end up with tadpoles, would several small minnows or shrimp pose a threat to them?
    The only possible issue I've been contemplating is competition for food.

    Also, as an aside: One of my females has changed the color she displays while sleeping in the last week. She's now a bright lime green instead of just dark green. Kind of neat.
     
  2. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Good luck. Let us know.
     
  3. justor

    justor Elite Member

    Very cool! How big of a setup do you need for five red-eyes? Are they all housed together?
     
  4. mld

    mld Subscribed User Premium Member

    Very cool indeed!
     
  5. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    I will want one of your babies :)
     
  6. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    I have a 75 gallon set up, but I think the ratio is typically like 10 to 15 gallons per frog... They are all housed together. :)

    Here are some pics
    http://www.herpcenter.com/tree-frogs/39215-my-red-eyed-tree-frogs-pic-heavy.html

    I'll probably raise a few for friends and then freeze the rest of the eggs and donate them.
    I'm not intentionally trying to breed them so I'm not really expecting anything but I apparently have great luck when it comes to my herps producing offspring. I'm half-expecting my savannah monitor to reproduce via parthenogenesis. :)
     
  7. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    Oh ok then
     
  8. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Good luck on the tads. All the information I have read on breeding them, is you have to set up a rain tank and simulate the rainy season, or the female won't lay.
     
  9. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    Yea I read the same thing when researching pacman frog breeding
     
  10. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    I have also read that. :) I have a rain system in their enclosure.
     
  11. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    I knew you would be on top of it Aja!!!!
     
  12. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    i get that you have a rain system. but it has to RAIN and RAIN and RAIN. I would think unless you have no substrate, that your plants are going to get root rot. Most people put them in a tank with a single, full pathos plant since they can handle the massive amounts of water.
     
  13. Evozakira

    Evozakira Elite Member

    I believe she has multiple drainage levels on her set up so that would help right?
     
  14. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    That definitely sounds like more rain than they are exposed to in the enclosure. :)

    My small male was amplexing with one of the females last night! That was a surprise. He let go at some point in the last few hours but now he's sleeping next to her on the glass, which is really uncharacteristic of him. She's not trying to shake him off like last time.
     
  15. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    Well good luck! I know my firebellies produced tads without any cool down. Perhaps with your good care, the RETFs will do the same without massive rain.
     
  16. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    Thanks! That's awesome. :)
    I don't think these tads are out of the realm of possibility since my frogs experience seasonal variation in food availability, humidity, and temperature.
     
  17. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    I think that's what did it for the firebellies. It happened in the spring. Our house is a bit colder in the winter. I do have a light bulb keeping the temp around 70, but when it goes off, its down to 66 at night. In the summer the AC keeps the house at 77, so it's generally warmer.
     
  18. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    My males are calling!

    ...a faint clucking noise was radiating from the enclosure last night lol :)
     

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