This Disappears When Logged In

Switching from live to frozen.

Discussion in 'Burmese Pythons' started by Karin, Jan 22, 2010.

  1. Karin

    Karin Member

    I also have a new albino burmese and she is almost 6 months old. I am trying to switch her from live food to frozen and am having a little bit of a problem. My vet told me that as long as the mice were room temperature and I wiggled them around a little bit, she would think it was alive and eat it. He used to breed snakes and really seems to know what he's talking about, but I still couldn't get her to eat. Does anyone have any suggestions, or should I just keep trying...

    Thanks!
    Karin
     
  2. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    How long have you had the snake and how are you housing it?
     
  3. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Yes, you should definitely keep trying! How long since the snake last ate?
     
  4. kenman1963

    kenman1963 Moderator

    You could try warming them up under a heat lamp for a bit. Just enough to get them above room temp.
     
  5. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Your vet has the right basic idea, in my opinion though, maybe you need to heat the prey to more than room temp. Rodents, being mammals have a body temp of approximately 98 degrees or so (from Wikipedia- I know it is not a totally trustworthy site since anyone can put info on there). Anyway, most snakes will not eat if the prey is too cool and average room temp is 70-78 degrees much colder than body temp for rodents. Mine usually eat when the prey is a bit higher than body temp or about the same temp. One other thing to think about, how big around is your snake? Maybe it is ready to switch over to rats.
     
  6. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I agree with David re. the body temps of the dead prey items.
     
  7. boaterr

    boaterr Well-Known Member

    I would not never feed a burm a mouse unless I absolutely had no other choice. Giant Snakes like burms should be fed rats from day one. Feeding mice is an unnecassary step that could result in a snake that will later become difficult to switch to rats later down the road.
     
  8. Karin

    Karin Member

    Thank you for all the responses. I'm sorry I haven't gotten back to you in a while. First of all, I've had her for almost 3 months now. Since I posted last, she HAS eaten one of the frozen mice. My husband fed it to her while I was at work! Which surprised me because he doesn't usually want to have much to do with her. I had laid the mouse out to thaw, and he decided to try it. She must have regretted passing it up the night before, because she snatched it right up, he said. I'm keeping her in a plastic container right now, because it's easier to clean and I've had a problem with mites. I am feeding her the small mice because I recently took her to the vet with a prolapsed rectum and I didn't want to make things too difficult for her to go to the bathroom. I know she can eat bigger prey, but she's eaten two of these small mice and hasn't gone yet. I was hoping she would go before I fed her another one. It's been a week since she's eaten. She's also shedding for the 3rd time since I've gotten her. I really enjoy all the pictures people post of their snakes and I promise I'll get some online soon!
     
  9. agama3000

    agama3000 Elite Member

    you should be careful with feeding your animals completely live food
     
  10. Karin

    Karin Member

    Hopefully I won't have to do that anymore since I was able to get her to eat a frozen one.
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    If you are underfeeding the snake it will go longer between times to "go".
     
  12. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    there are a number of tricks for convincing finicky snakes to eat dead rodents. I had to try with one of our BP for 3 years, and I tried everything in the books, and quite a few ideas besides. Get her switched to something a little larger pretty soon - burms grow very fast, and need a lot of food in their first few years of life.

    I have always found that prey with "body heat" seems to get the attention of my snakes much better than room temp rodents do.

    Good luck, and we are expecting these pics of yours anytime.
     

Share This Page