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Sick anole?

Discussion in 'Herp Health' started by Lorarama, Jan 31, 2007.

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  1. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    Hi, I am new here. And also not very experienced herp owner. We have green anoles and one seems to be sick. What do you guys think...He's losing weight, not eating his crickets, lethargic. He is normally very active when I try to grab him for cage cleaning, but now, I can catch easily. He is still moving, but just not his usual fiestiness. Also, he seems to be keeping his eyes like half-closed. :confused: He's not usually a really bright green one, and he still gets green after I tried to touch him just now.

    Anyways, we've had him for a year and he's seemed healthy until now. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance.
    ~Laura
     
  2. aiden_punx

    aiden_punx Elite Member

    Can you give any more details on your husbandry..

    Temps
    humidity
    lighting
    Any other animals in the enclosure
    feeding

    size of tank
     
  3. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    Hi, thanks for reply.
    He's in a 10 gal. aquarium with wire mesh top by himself. I use the walnut shell substrate and he has various silk plants and vines and little coconut hut. He has a heat lamp and a UV (coil type) lamp, both used during the day. The temp in there right now is about 85 or so, at night we keep our house warm, probably 72. I don't have a way to measure humidity, but we spray his cage throughout the day.
    I usually feed him every couple days, as he doesn't eat all the crickets right away. Right now, the diet has just been small crickets that are fed calcium-enriched food. We have done mealworms before, but he wasn't really into them so much.

    Right now he looks a little better than when I posted, but still, doesn't seem to be opening his eyes all the way. He's still green.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  4. dan_rump

    dan_rump Elite Member

    Feeding them isn't hard... but i've heard that feeding them only crickets doesn't work. the normal life span of anoles is also only 7 years. i've also read that anoles never "over stuff" themselves like we do on thanksgiving :) try catching flies, moths, grasshoppers... anything that you would find in there wild that is away from farms and doesn't have pesticides on them. meal worms and wax worms also work to.

    question: i also read that peach baby food is good if they will eat it?

    if you have any other questions here is the site where i got this information from...
    http://members.aol.com/Mite37/TPFGA.html
     
  5. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    Thanks for the reply...I will try meal worms again. Catching wild stuff isn't going to happen right now...Chicago in January isn't so friendly for the bugs, lol. I did try the peach baby food when we first got our female, she ate it like the first day and never saw her touch it since. But I will try with this guy..maybe he's bored of crickets.

    Thanks.
     
  6. dan_rump

    dan_rump Elite Member

    not a problem. :) also check out that site though because he might be dehydrated. but idk. im in ft. wayne and it is definitly no where close to warm. lol.
     
  7. Lyn

    Lyn Elite Member

    Im worried about the crushed walnut shell substrate...he may have ingested it while catching his crickets and could be impacted ...Do you use a UVB light?? They are diurnal animals and they need the UVB to process calcium.. ..If you got your anole as an adult, he could be just dying of old age....there is no way to tell how old they are when you buy them....they are always wild caught....well thats all I can think of right now...best wishes with your little anole...
     
  8. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    His one eye has buggers in it tonite, maybe he's got an eye infection. How the %$#@ to you treat a skittish anole's eye??

    :eek: thanks, laura
     
  9. Moshpitrockchick

    Moshpitrockchick Subscribed User Premium Member

    Runny eyes could be a sign of a respiritory infection..or it could be irritated by that nasty evil crushed walnit shell substrate.

    Throw the walut shells into the trash, that stuff is a death sentence.
    When you are out buying him a new substrate I would get a hygrometer so you can check his humidty levels. If it is indeed a resp. infection it would be caused or aggravated by too high humidity and possibly too low of temps (maybe a cold night, or a draft)

    Another thing is that anoles need a strong source of UVB generally those coil lamps just don't put out enough to satisfy the needs of most animals, especially if it is filtered through glass or the screen top.
     
  10. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    what kind of substrate then? I tried the bark chips but the crickets seemed to hide too well in them...

    Thanks for the help.
     
  11. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    A soil, wood, or peat mulch-based substrate will work much better. Personally I believe the best substrate is some pure, clean topsoil. Most packaged potting soil comes with fertilizers, perlite, vermiculite, fungicides, pesticides, or other chemicals in them, but I'm sure there are some out there free of these things. Topsoil is typically devoid of chemicals...I think. I've never actually bought it, I just use soil dug up from my backyard. If you do opt for digging (might be hard in January though) you may wish to bake the dirt to kill off any pesky critters in it, though I don't do this myself.

    If you can't find useable soil, you may wish to look around for some hardwood mulch, like that used for lining the bases of trees on some properties. Pet store substrates are generally insufficient when compared to the options you can find in the home and garden section of a hardware store (or Walmart). The mulch has similar properties to soil, and unlike softwood mulches (like cedar or pine) it's non toxic. Since it's designed to be used in bulk rather than for lizards, you can usually buy a rather large bag for a very low cost when compared to pet store substrates. It will last you a long time.

    As Lacey mentioned, a respiratory infection is usually a sign of low temperatures or overly high humidity, but since your habitat seems ok in those aspects, I don't think an RI is to blame. If your anole starts holding his mouth open though, then it's more likely. Again as she mentioned, it could possibly just be the walnut bedding, or your anole could have gotten sick from something else. One thing I would recommend is getting a new UVB light. Unfortunately the coil lamps aren't as efficient as the fluorescent tubes, which are already rather inefficient when compared to mercury vapor lights. Your habitat is too small to warrent the use of a mercury vapor though, but a fluorescent tube across the top will do your anole good. It's unlikely that the anole is bored with his diet, they're generally not that picky.
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I have used the baking technique myself. Be warned though that it will smell up the house and the smell will linger for days!
     
  13. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    I'm tempted to try it sometime just because I'm so curious as to what baking dirt could possibly smell like :p Since I keep earthworms, isopods, centipedes, and other little critters in my soil, I tend to leave mine unbaked, but I haven't had to gather dirt in years anyway.
     
  14. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    LOL! Matt when you try it you might want to arrange to be able to leave the house for a couple of days.
    It was an odd type of smell.
    I found it mildy annoying but it bugged the heck out of my ex wife!
    But then so did everything else!
     
  15. Moshpitrockchick

    Moshpitrockchick Subscribed User Premium Member

    I suppose you'll have to wait until you have an oven matt, I havent read anything on the effectiveness of microwaving the soil!
     
  16. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    Well the barracks do have an oven in the common area downstairs.... ;)
     
  17. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Do you really enjoy peeling potatos THAT much?:p
     
  18. Lorarama

    Lorarama Member

    Why is everything so hard in January, lol! Don't think my husband would take kindly to the baking of dirt...it's the most i'd have used the oven for in weeks!;)
     
  19. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Just tell him its an ancient family recipe!;)
    And most garden centers do have topsoil and peat moss without additives year round.
     
  20. furryscaly

    furryscaly Elite Member

    lol, yeah, in that case I'd opt for some store-bought soil, peat mulch, or hardwood mulch. If you can't find them, coconut fiber or Bed-A-Beast from a pet store will do. Cypress mulch (also available at pet stores), may possibly be used, but I don't trust it because it's derived from conifers. Walnut bedding, like many other pet products, unfortunately does more harm than good and serves no real purpose other than to make the industry money. You can add that to the list along with pine and cedar bedding, liquid UV drops, Calci-Sand, and many other bad products. Also keep in mind that although the walnut bedding has got to go, it ay not necessarily be the cause of your anole's current problems, so keep us posted on how he's doing. You may wish to add electrolytes to the water to stimulate his appetite. These can be found in Reptisafe water conditioner, Pedialyte, or if need be, Gatorade, though I recommend the alternatives to that one.
     
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