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Settling in a New Green Tree Python

Discussion in 'Green Tree Pythons' started by DustinQ, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. DustinQ

    DustinQ Elite Member

    Just under a month ago my girlfriend brought home a green tree python (2.5 years old supposed male) from Craigslist knowing it had mites, owner was leaving his parent's house and was rehoming all of his reptiles and didn't want to deal with mites. So we got sunny for FREE. Previous owner said he hadn't eaten in 14 days typically ate every 3days. Obviously the snake is a little out of sorts and stressed after being re-homed, treated for mites, taken out of his enclosure and placed in a quarantine tub. So it's completely normal that he's fasting but when should I begin to be concerned? I've gotten rid of the enclosure he came with it was a bit small, top opening screen and didn't want to risk mites spreading. Painting the interior of his new enclosure I built and will be water sealing the whole thing by the end of the week and I think after another thorough inspection for mites I'll move him into the new space.
     
  2. jarich

    jarich Elite Member

    It was being fed every 3 days? Thats pretty weird. Once a week is plenty. Not that Ive ever seen an obese GTP, but feeding every three days seems a little excessive.

    Honestly, I wouldnt worry about it not eating, well pretty much at all. I think GTPs are the pickiest reptile Ive ever owned regarding that sort of thing. They can take literally months before they feel all safe and secure in their new home. Often they will go off feeding for some time in the winter as well, depending on the individual. If it doesnt take food, wait two weeks and try again. Dont continue trying to feed every few days as this will just stress it out further. You want to give it a lot of good places to hide and feel secure (at various levels and points in the heat gradient) so that it can acclimate. Then just wait it out. If your enclosure is well set up and has proper temperatures/gradient/humidity/etc then it will come around and feed eventually. Ive heard of cases where it took up to nine months before it ate. Like I said, skittish little things sometimes. ;)
     
  3. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    You still want to treat for mites. They can lodge themselves between the scales.

    Feed a few days after first mites treatment. I'm betting its why he refused to begin with.

    Edit: sorry didn't read he had been treated. Lol. He's 2 years old and if he was fed every 3 days he's way overfed unless he was getting small mice. Adults can go months between feeding. I only feed mine every 2-3 weeks but I feed proper size food also.
     
  4. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    I can tell you that whoever had it had no respect or knowledge of the animal. Glad you were able to treat the poor thing.... Feeding every 3 days is nearly impossible for a male, don't know many that will eat that much. Most males tend to be really picking eaters (with some exceptions of course). Don't worry about feeding the animal yet, it will show you when it wants to feed. When you see it hanging down obviously looking for food then you'll know. Till you see it in a hunting stance don't even bother and it may take some time. Even then some will be really picky and may not eat what they were eating before. Have patience with it because chondros even more the Balls will teach you to wait ;)
     
  5. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    I want one....... Ugh.
     
  6. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    No time like the present to go and find one ;)
     
  7. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    Horrible influences. We actually decided last night.
     
  8. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    I try :)
     
  9. Zappa230

    Zappa230 Elite Member

    I would LOVE to have a GTP or Emerald Tree Boa but my parents don't like snakes OR rodents, so even if they allowed the snake, how is he supposed to eat? Still, the best of luck on getting your new snake eating!
     
  10. DustinQ

    DustinQ Elite Member

    You want to give it a lot of good places to hide and feel secure (at various levels and points in the heat gradient) so that it can acclimate.[/QUOTE]

    I just read on the reptile channel care sheet not to provide too much of a place to hide because they might stay in there all the time and not thermoregulate properly. I don't think the kid was very knowledgable, didn't meet him myself. But any care sheet I've ever seen says only to offer food every 10-14 days. I haven't moved him into his new enclosure yet because I wanted to be sure the mites were gone so he's in a small 2x2x1 sterilite container at the moment. I haven't seen any since the first treatment July 5th, I think it was. Did a second treatment on the 20th, my birthday. Sunny is actually a birthday present :D hey Joey G if you could chime in again on the hiding places I'd really appreciate it.
    Thanks everyone!
     
  11. JoeyG

    JoeyG Subscribed User Premium Member

    Honestly when a get a new one I usually add enough cover that they can't be seen from outside that well. To me it allows them to settle in better and with babies I even cover the front completely. I place more cover around the heat panel to ensure they know where the heat source is. If they over heat I adjust temps to make it more comfortable for them to perch there. They will regulate when it's to hot so no worries. At times they'll ground themselves to get away or move even into the open, they know what they need. Adding cover also gives the enclosure a little more of a natural look which I like. Hope that answers the question :)
     
  12. DustinQ

    DustinQ Elite Member

    Yes it does. Thank you
     

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