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Respitory Infection In A Res?

Discussion in 'Turtles' started by Dan01, Aug 12, 2015.

  1. Dan01

    Dan01 Established Member

    My friend has had his turtle for several years now and I think he knows as well as I do that his turtle's care isn't quite purfect. He has been fed on comercial feed only since he was caught in the wild, and the filter has been too small, and his tank was small as well. The turtle also has some pyramiding (this isn't reversible, is it?). But my friend just upgraded the tank and the filter, and the water quality has gone up a ton to where it is crystal clear when it used to turn brown and murky within a week.

    But now, whenever we lift the turtle out of the water, we can hear his breathing, raspy and loud. Does anyone know what could have caused this, or what "this" exactly is? What could be done to help?

    My friend and his turtle, Irvine, will appreciate any helpfull advice.
     
  2. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    What temp is the water being kept at, what temp is the basking site, and does the red ear have any access to UV? And what is the ambient room temp?
     
  3. Dan01

    Dan01 Established Member

    How do you measure water temps? Do you use a temp gun? Or a probe (I don't know if mine is waterproof )? Theses are the only thermometers I have, and I'll take them over to my friend's house to check the best I can.
    The turtle newly has a uv light and constantly has a basking spot (it used to go out very quickly and wouldn't be replaced for several weeks). I don't think the turtle has the ability to climb up to the basking spot, though.

    One question: does the uv light only need to go over the basking spot, or over the water as well?
     
  4. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    I have used a temp gun or probe, just make sure to use the gun at an angle if you go that route, reflections from the waters surface can mess up the readings. Typically I only provide a UV source in the basking area since the water will reflect or absorb most of whatever is provided. Añd it's vital that the turtle can access the basking site even if they don't use it much at first. Yours might still be getting used to the new setup, and not have it figured out yet. They just need to be able to get completely dry when they want to.
     
  5. Dan01

    Dan01 Established Member

    I haven't been able to measure the temps yet. What is likely to have caused the infection, if that is what it is? Low temperatures? The inability to completley emerge from the water? How would the lack of UV affect the turtle? Thanks (although I'm not sure if anyone will ever read this).
     
  6. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    I always read the replies to any thread I have posted on, it just might take a day or three sometimes.
    Low temps have always been the first thing I look at when dealing with any RI issues in a reptile. Once that has been addressed we can move on to other causes. The lack of UV exposure will not immediately show, but will usually lead to shell deformities and MBD eventually, especially without proper supplemation, which is always kind of guess work anyway, and the reason to have as varied a diet as possible. As for not being able to get out to bask, that can cause several issues, improper digestion from not being able to get warm enough, greater likelihood of skin issues or shell rot, especially if water conditions deteriorate.
    Just so you have the numbers, ili!e to keep the water temperature between 75-80°, and the basking site usually around 90°, although if I have the room I will give them a gradient there up to 100°
     
  7. Dan01

    Dan01 Established Member

    When you say 90 degrees, do you mean surface temps or air temps?
     
  8. Darkbird

    Darkbird Elite Member

    Whoops, should have been more specific. Those are surface temps for the basking site, preferably read with an IR temp gun. Ambient air temps are less critical, but shouldn't be too much below the water temp, example is I usually keep my house at around 72, and the basement where I had them set up last winter was anywhere from 65-70. So I let the water temps fall to 70, but maintained the basking surface temps. Out of a dozen turtles, not one had any issues with this over the winter.
    As for the current situation, I've never actually dealt with an RI in a red ear, but I would raise the water temp to 80 anyway, increasing heat is kind of a standard initial treatment for reptiles. I would also locate a reptile friendly vet just in case, as an advanced RI will require meds to clear up.
     

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