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Recommendations Anyone?

Discussion in 'Invertebrates General' started by alpine, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    So I have a DEEP running fear of spiders and other 8 legged invertebrates but I want to work on getting over it so that I can become comfortable with them. I want to know if anyone could recommend a tarantula that I could start with. I have been working up a little bit, I don't go near spiders or other inverts but I have worked on being tolerant and have gotten off of the whole "OMG IT'S GOING TO KILL ME, KILL IT KILL IT!" mentality and have learned to just get the **** over them being around. So I want to know what people would recommend as a started tarantula as well as maybe give a care sheet so that I can get an idea of what I will need to make sure it lives. I don't want anything that gets too large... That will just give me nightmares, I just want something of moderate size (don't plan on handling it) and the information on cleaning etc so that I can take care of it properly... Oddly enough this fear only really goes towards tarantulas and spiders, scorpions don't quite scare me as much though so any opinions or recommendations are appreciated. Thanks in advance guys.
     
  2. MentatIx

    MentatIx Active Member

  3. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    I want to work towards handling. I don't like spiders much but I have been working on that because I feel that it is a pointless fear (other than when it comes to the dangerous species) but how is it to handle the rose hairs? I know a few shops in the area carry them. How flighty are they? Do they have a tendency towards biting? And what about scorpions? Thanks!
     
  4. MentatIx

    MentatIx Active Member

    In my vast experience (I kept a spider once, I swear!) the rose hair is the easiest one to handle. Others you might commonly see in a regular pet store: the pink toe, which is a good option but tend to be a bit flightier, or the cobalt blue which is pretty but you probably don't want to handle at all... can't think of any others I've normally seen in normal stores.

    The rose hairs are super placid and generally don't bite or take off.

    Emporer scorpions you can handle sometimes, depending on the scorpion. Sometimes you get one that wants to pinch or (more rarely) sting. I generally don't free handle mine, but many people do.

    I'm sure someone will correct me on some of that - I don't do spiders mostly, though I have had a few here and there in my time.
     
  5. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    I think there are rose hairs at my local pet store. I'm going through the list of stuff that is recommended for them I have a 10 gallon tank. I assume that is plenty of space? I have a UTH and t-stat. I'd have to get substrate housing for it and some foliage for it. Now what I want to know is if rose hairs are burrowers or if they are okay with a thinner layer of substrate if they do burrow what should I use as a substrate? I am alright with providing any required substrate at any depth. And what about cleaning? How often and how much should I do? What about life span for them? Temps? I gotta know it all :)
     
  6. MentatIx

    MentatIx Active Member

    Ten gallon is more than enough space. I haven't known them to burrow, but a hide would be good. I would use coco fiber bedding like eco-earth or bed-a-beast or whatever brand. Not too deep or the heat mat won't be very effective.. maybe an inch for those guys, I think. Clean it when it gets dirty. Spot clean cricket bits. Disinfect and replace all bedding every few months.

    Life span is 4-5 years for males and bunches longer for females. Can't remember a specific temp for those guys. Can't imagine it'd be very high. 80s maybe?

    It's been a super long time since I've kept one. I don't even remember using heat last time I had one. Google is your friend, though. It knows everything.
     
  7. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    It does indeed. Thanks for your help:)

    So after doing a little googling I find that I can't find any information on temperatures. Some say that they are fine in the temps of the room others say that they should be kept in the 80s other say that there should be absolutely no need for the UTH or light or anything because they might be burned or cooked by the UTH (not sure if that applies when you use a T-stat) and I want to know what the thoughts are. I already have a nice large tank and if there is no need for a UTH then hey, better for me. But I have also read contrasting opinions on feeding and how much to feed etc. And there is still some debate on whether or not they are burrowers, if indeed they do burrow then should I provide a particular kind of substrate to allow for it? (which I would be more than happy to do) or do they only need a small amount? I am just curious about that. Mentatix, took your advise and googled like crazy but these are just the questions that I have after reading quite a bit of googling and research. Lots of contrasting information.
     
  8. MentatIx

    MentatIx Active Member

    Might be a case of these things are just so dang easy anything works. Use the coco fiber stuff for burrowers, make it deep and see what it does. Use the heat pad and set the warm end to 80-82. Or if you keep the room in the mid-70s anyway, don't bother with the heater. Feed it when it wants to eat. Don't make it complicated. :cool:

    Somebody with a clue will be by to clear up any specifics, I'm sure.
     
  9. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I had a rose hair 7-8 years ago and I don't remember doing anything special for it. It was in a ten gallon with dirt and leaves with a hide and some cork board set at an angle that he climbed every once in awhile. I fed him every day and changed his water when needed. Didn't add additional heat or lights. I had him for 2 years but don't know how old he was when I got him.
     
  10. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    When they reach maturity you can feed them every 2 days. Rose hair's are good. Make sure you get one that's relatively small-if you have to get one at a pet store. Because an adult that's never been handled might not be the sweetest guy.

    If your house-room or whatever is under 73 or 72 you'll need a heat matt on half the underside of the tank. If you decorate the ten gallon a lot it gives the spider more things to do and she/he will be a lot more active! :) They are PERFECT starter tarantulas.
     
  11. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    Awesome. As a general rule my house is usually in the mid to high seventies So I will monitor it and if it is needed then I will go and get a heat pad for him. Do rose hairs burrow? If they want a few extra layers of substrate then I would be happy to get it for em. And what constitutes a young rose hair in terms of size?? Because finding a breeder in the area will be a nightmare... So will shipping for a $10-15 invert.
     
  12. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    nope. They do not burrow. two inches or so substrate will be fine! and small would be under 4 inches legspan. Usualy at petstores they do have small tarantulas. and rarely have adults. I dont understand your shipping question.
     
  13. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    alright good to know. I think my local pet store has them for sale. at like 2.5 inch body size or something like that, I'll have to look to see what they are like.
     
  14. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    That would be a good size! They are great spiders! Do you know how to set their enclosure up?
     
  15. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    Not a clue. I have been looking online and seen TONS of conflicting information. When in doubt I turn to forums though. So any help would be appreciated.
     
  16. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    A ten gallon aquarium would be ok. But ou can get bigger plastic containers from Walmart or anywhere really. They say Rosie's are pet rocks-but that's people who put a water dish and a small plant in their 5 gallon. I had a girl Rosie in a 20 long and she used every square inch of it. Like I've said to someone else-the more toys you put the more they will play! :) They don't like moist ground-they will crawl up when it's wet but they do need humidity. So spray and make the ground a little moist on one side-and the other spray it twice as much. A small water dish is needed-about twice the length of the spider-and very shallow so they won't drown. Also if it's too steep I've seen adults not even go near it to not risk drowning. Any kind of soil/Eco earth bed a beast whatever is fine. They won't eat it. I've had spiders of all kinds for around 5 years so ask all the questions you want! And I'll see if I can help.
     
  17. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    If you can find yourself an expo. I see "T"s all the time.
     
  18. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    And they are usually half the price of what you would pay at a pet store. And a lot more to choose from.
     
  19. alpine

    alpine Elite Member

    That is great help, thanks for the help! How deep should I make the substrate? No need for heating or UTH? How large of a plastic container should I use? I am not averse to having a larger tub for the guy, I may be nervous with em but if I am going to get it I am going to make sure that it is comfortable, even if I never handle the little guy. Give me all the info you can! I've heard that rose hairs are good so I think I am going to get one of those since they are common here. I need all the info I can get, the internet has a lot of contrasting information. So any help is much appreciated guys, thanks!
     
  20. Pharoahound

    Pharoahound Elite Member

    Spiders are nothing to be afraid of. Ok maybe the small deadly ones. But big fat lazy hairy ones are just fine. The only problem I might see you having is when you first start to handle her (and you WILL ;) ) She might Kick the hairs on her butt off on you. They might burn just a tad then itch really bad lol. But after a hand wash and a few scratches there's no real damage. Any plastic container that is bigger then a ten gallon is fine-but they can climb plastic. They are known to be a mostly terrestrial tarantula but give them the chance they will climb anything. And like dubias or other feeders some slick packing tape half way up the bin will limit their climbing. Sterilite Stacker Storage Box - Walmart.com something like that size would be great. Plenty of floor room and room if you put some leaning bark and sticks up so she can climb. and if you'd like-when it gets cold you can place a heater of your choice to the bottom of one half of the bin/aquarium. Measure the temps to make sure it doesn't go over 80

    Sterilite 26.25-Gallon (105-Quart) Latch Box, Set of 4: Storage & Organization : Walmart.com as well as this one-or a storage bin with similar dimensions
     

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