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Question

Discussion in 'Snakes - General' started by Horselover, Oct 17, 2011.

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What was your first pet?

  1. Snake

    4.0%
  2. Gecko

    12.0%
  3. Lizard

    24.0%
  4. Frog

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Turtle

    12.0%
  6. Tortoise

    4.0%
  7. Something Furry

    44.0%
  1. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    Does anyone know of a pet snake that does not eat rodents? Can't find anything! I really don't like the idea of feeding a snake something cute and furry. I think I might strike out on this one.
     
  2. missabrat

    missabrat Elite Member

    as I already answered you in the private message you sent, the only insect eating snake that I can think of offhand is the rough green snake....
     
  3. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    I know. I just wanted a few different types for comparison. Don't be angry. :(
     
  4. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, you can use f/t, they are euthenised quite humanely, and aren`t so cute and furry (I`m not being sarcastic). We all eat "cute and furry" animals, unless we`re vegetarian, of course, though most of the time we don`t kill them ourselves! ;)
     
  5. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    That just sound GROSS. Here fluffy, come eat this God-only-knows-how-long dead mouse. See?
     
  6. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Have you ever eaten frozen, then thawed food? (I`ll guess yes)...
    The reason for feeding f/t is that it`s safe for the snake, and not such an ordeal for the prey (the best of both worlds)! ;)
    Edit: Insects have feelings too!
     
  7. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    Ijust don't want a dead mouse thawing in our fridge or on our counter every few days. Dad would so not go for that. Now I feel like I'm just arguing with you. My dad says I should be a lawyer. I'd rather be a vet.
     
  8. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I understand your problem of keeping frozen rodents in the fridge/freezer, especially in your parents house! As most snakes only feed every 7 to 10 days, you could just buy one at a time, and defrost it overnight..
    I don`t think that you`re arguing, you`re perfecly entitled to disagree.
    I`m trying to help you get what I think you want; a snake! ;) (Albeit a vegetarian snake, which I`ve been reliably informed are extremely rare, these days)....
    You could be a vet 3 days a week, and a lawyer the other two (unless you work more than a 5 day week)...
     
  9. hennisntacanibal

    hennisntacanibal Elite Member

    So...if you want to be a vet you are going to have to get over your yuck factor for pretty much everything animal related. Not only are you going to be dealing with blood, poop, pus, organs and all manner of ickies, but you are going to be doing that every day. Not to mention that euthanization is a very real part of veterinary medicine, so if you can't feed something that was once "cute and furry" to another animal that eats them in the wild, how are you going to be able to look that critter in the eye when it is alive and know you are going to have to end its life? Sorry, I'm getting a little off-topic here, and probably a little snooty, but I personally think feeding frozen/thawed rodents is a whole lot less traumatic than putting an animal to sleep. And there are plenty of ways to make the fact that you have dead rats in your freezer a little less apparent to others who are living in your house.

    Snakes are some of the most incredible animals to keep as a herp enthusiast, but if you can't reconcile yourself to the idea of feeding them their necessary food items, then yes I think you are out of luck.

    Phew, now that I'm off my high horse...
    Haha that is so true!
     
  10. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    And the few totally insect eaing snakes are not fit for begining keepers. Most all are wild caught and very demanding in their care requirements.
     
  11. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    I think that I can do a RGS. They have a moderate amount of requirments, but they are pretty basic. The only complication is that they need moderate humidity, but can't stand stagnant air. How do you fix that problem?
     
  12. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Actually the complication is, as I just stated, they are not fit as a starter snake! Even advanced keepers have trouble keeping them alive for very long.
     
  13. giveuptheghost

    giveuptheghost Well-Known Member

    I don't know about husbandry requirements and if they are fit for beginners, but there are a few snakes that eat lizards primarily, yes?

    Asian Vine Snakes come to mind. I have no idea about their requirements though-- though I have a feeling that aren't all that amenable to handling. And I don't know if they do f/t anoles. The reptile place I go to feeds f/t except when they feed the lizard eaters-- they get live anoles. So...yeah... don't know if you'd care to watch that either.

    Garter Snakes can be fed worms and small fish, I believe.



    And to answer the poll question: my first pet was a little rabbit, named Hopper.
     
  14. missabrat

    missabrat Elite Member

    Asian vines are very difficult to keep in captivity, they feed primarily on lizards and frogs and are always wild caught and usually full of parasites, they are a look at only snake as they do not tolerate handling
     
  15. missabrat

    missabrat Elite Member

    Not angry at all,I understand you wanting different opinions and that it completely fine by me because I never said I was an expert...far from it learning as I go...but as already stated they do not make good beginner animals, nor do they tolerate handling because they are easily stressed, and although care requirements may seem "basic", these animals are all wild caught and do not readily acclimate to captivity.
     
  16. giveuptheghost

    giveuptheghost Well-Known Member

    I suspected as much.


    I'm thinking the best bet is a Garter Snake then, yes? Although they will certainly enjoy and benefit from the occasional pinkie. They eat a fairly wide variety of things in the wild though, so you'd need to make sure you are providing a balanced diet that fits with whatever specific species of Garter you have.
     
  17. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    I looked at garter snakes and as far as diet goes, easy for me. Frogs lay eggs in my back yard all the time, my friends have a lake full of minnows, lizards are always laying eggs in my planters out in our back yard, and earthworms are almost invasive. Ribbon snakes also have this diet, so I think I'll compare those two. I'll let you know what I find, because noone seems to know much on this topic.
     
  18. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    Okay, the first garter snake page, and I choose the ribbon snake. Garter snakes often require hibernation, and that's a big pain in the b***.
     
  19. Horselover

    Horselover Elite Member

    Hey, Murrindindi, my mom said that they stick live mice into the freezer and freeze them to death. That is NOT humane!
     
  20. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Your mother is mistaken!!
    Commercial rodent distributers use CO2 gas.
    The mice just go to sleep and never wake up.
     

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