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QUESTION: LED Lighting with Snakes and Other Reptiles?

Discussion in 'Habitat Lighting' started by Renouji, Feb 23, 2013.

  1. Renouji

    Renouji Elite Member

    So I have been doing some research for my home on energy efficient light for my home and was wondering, would LED lighting such as LED house bulbs affect a snake or other reptiles vision such as compact fluorescent light bulbs do? has this even been researched?
     
  2. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    Compact fluorescents don't affect a reptile vision, only UVB Compact fluorescents Have shown any signs of damage to reptiles. As far as a LEDs are concerned they're super bright and extremely focused light. Until more research is done I would use caution around them.
     
  3. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    LED lighting options have been around for years and many of them are safe for use within reptile enclosures (i.e. Jungle Dawn). Some of these diodes produce moderate-high levels of UVA (320-400nm range) however these diodes must be used in conjunction with a careful selection of other diodes that produce different light quality in order to create a spectrum similar to that of natural daylight (5000-6500K range). You will get a better idea of this here, although the spectrum for reef tanks are, IIRC, ideally in the +10,000K range, which is well outside that of natural daylight. In regards to UVB, as far as I know there are no effective, as in tried and true, UVB (280-320nm) emitting diodes available but they are are currently being researched and experimented with. So, in short, based on efficiency and light output (lumens) LED is the future of lighting.
     
  4. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    I really hope they make led UVB lights soon. That would be incredible.
     
  5. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    They already make the diodes for UVB and UVC, but are supper expensive.
     
  6. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    UVC that's an option? I didn't know their was a third uv ray.
     
  7. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    They are out there, but to my knowledge none have been tested to meet the needs of reptiles and birds. There are also many manufacturers that try to pass some of there products off as 'herp safe', yet the specs of these products do not meet the given requirements. If you have a link to any number of these UVB diodes I'd love to see it/them.
     
  8. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    UVC will kill any living organism, therefore it is not an option. Bulbs that emit this type of radiation are often used in water purification plants.
     
  9. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    This!^^^^^^^^^^^^
     
  10. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Alrighty then. I will not worry about uvc.
     
  11. TJOHNSON722

    TJOHNSON722 Elite Member

    That's interesting. If you do find one Vers that does emit UVB and has been tested etc I would buy it.

    I did hear from my husband (don't know how reliable it is) that there is a set of UVB leds that you can buy (whole thing is like 8x8 or something). I'll ask him when he gets home from work.
     
  12. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    UVC is in the range of 185-230nm if I remember correctly. They are sterilization bulbs used in outdoor fish ponds and for saltwater aquariums. I did some research to make my own UVC sterilizer for my 125 gallon aquarium using these diodes.
     
  13. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    So it doesn't kill the fish?
     
  14. Renouji

    Renouji Elite Member

    Well. I was only planning on using LED bulbs for my house lighting not the reptiles. But if there is a chance its bad for them I don't want to risk it
     
  15. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    If its just for your house it should be fine. The issue usually comes when they are in close range of the lights.
     
  16. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    UVC sterilizers have a box that keeps the light where it needs to be. As far as led in your home you are good to go.
     
  17. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I used to use single diode lamps for synthetic moonlight for my herps. They make them in different colors, red, blue, etc. Just a single not very bright one gave off a very moon-like amount of light. I never did use them for daylights.
     
  18. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    This is correct. If UVC emitting light sources are used, it is used separate from any living organisms the keeper wants to maintain. I would imagine it's completely limited to the filtration of the water within a contained area...otherwise you have the makings for sushi/sashimi, dead coral etc etc.

    EDIT: It appears UVC falls within the 100-280nm range, and some sources claim upwards to 290nm.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2013
  19. jdandlucy

    jdandlucy Elite Member

    UVC is also used in air purification. From 250-290 is short wave UVB. This is the reason compact fluorescent UVB should not be used. These bulbs produce far too much in this wavelength. With the new advancements in the LED technology, the correct wavelengths are now being produced for reptile use, but they come with an astronomical price.
     
  20. Vers

    Vers Elite Member

    Where are these diodes available? I ask because I've yet to see any that are both UVB and reptile oriented.
     

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