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Question About Sav Humidity

Discussion in 'Humidity' started by SVMonitor, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. SVMonitor

    SVMonitor Well-Known Member

    In my Savannah monitor enclosure I have a pretty good temperature gradient:In his basking spot the temp is 130 directly under the light and about 110 to the sides. His cool side is about 78 degrees and under the basking spot in the shade area the temp is about 85. What I am wondering about is the humidity levels. In the shady part of the enclosure (under the basking spot platform) the humidity is somewhere around 90% in the basking spot it is 70% and the rest of the cage is between 60 and 70%.

    Is this enough variation? Should the basking area humidity be lower? The enclosure gets decent air flow but I think I need a high vent to bring down the humidity a bit. Thought?
     
  2. FervidBrutality

    FervidBrutality Elite Member

    The 90% is too high, I'd say. Try to keep the whole enclosure at a gradient of 45-65% and you savvie should do well. :) Not too dry, not too muggy :p
     
  3. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    What are you using to measure humidity? A gradient of 50%-90% throughout the cage would work well.
     
  4. SVMonitor

    SVMonitor Well-Known Member

    A digital indoor/outdoor thermometer and hygrometer.
     
  5. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    Do you move it and leave is sitting for a few hours to different points in the cage to get the readings?
     
  6. FervidBrutality

    FervidBrutality Elite Member

    Digital is the way to go; like James said, move it around. Be sure to checm on it often and record the average level in different parts of the enclosure, just to be sure. :)
     
  7. SVMonitor

    SVMonitor Well-Known Member

    I move it to a new location and leave it there for a day. The digital gauge I have records a high and low for the day so I can see how much it varies.
     
  8. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    Sounds like you are doing it right. Can you post a pic of the enclosure in here?
     
  9. SVMonitor

    SVMonitor Well-Known Member

    I picked up today so all that stuff isn't around it now. :)

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  10. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    Monitors do best having the ability to choose which temperatures and humidity they require for themselves. So all we have to do is supply the best gradients we can and they will do the rest.
    This is why a deep substrate works the best for monitors. The burrows can be a cooler/damper area that they can seek out when required.
    Where we fail in monitor husbandry is when we force them to use what we have provided and it's not suitable. So they must make the best of it.
     
  11. FervidBrutality

    FervidBrutality Elite Member

    I'll find Baku, hanging unpside down on the roof of his enclosure one hour, 6" deep in dirt another, sitting in his pond the next, and right up under his basking light after that. :p He changes his mind a lot; maybe he's picky. I dunno. Haha.
    But it is definately best to make as many options as possible. (without having extremes)
     
  12. jamesw

    jamesw Elite Member

    I would recommend getting a lot more dirt in there. Is that basking rock pile stable? Many people have lost reptiles do to them getting smashed by rocks that weren't stable.
     
  13. kriminaal

    kriminaal HH Block Leader Staff Member Premium Member

    I forget who I was talking to (someone wiser than me obviously) and they were talking about us and how we react to temperature changes.
    If you figure our regular temp is around 98 F but a fever of a 103 deg is dangerous then we understand temperature gradients a little better.
    Our course warm-blood/cold-blood is a little different.
     

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