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new frogs... so excited!!!

Discussion in 'Poison Dart Frogs' started by M00nbeam, Jan 21, 2015.

  1. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    I have three Ranitomeya imitators reserved for delivery once the weather breaks (hopfully within the next month or i may be taking a weekend road trip lol) i cant wait for my new froggies, and started their tank set up in the mean time. i have never owned this specific breed of dart before, so comments are very welcome. (this is live planted the only fake plant is the ivy stuff untill the live one grows more)
    IMG_0797[1].JPG second i have a question, there is probally no one that can answer this though. i have an adult red spotted newt i rescued from a construction site i was working on last season. he was accidently cold tacked into a road. i took him home to clean him up and nurse him back to health, he will be released back to the wild as soon as it is warm enough. does anyone know if i can let him stay in the pond area i have in this tank? he is almost entirely aquatic, so i put him there while cleaning his enclosure. here he is sitting on the water return he travels from there back into he water. he just about 100% aquatic. IMG_0785[1].JPG anyway please respond if you have any experience attempting to house these animals together (again this is a temp uuntil he is released) please don't respond that they are not native to the same area etc. i am asking for responses from anyone who has attempted this or similar pairing if it is possible for a month or two. he is healthy and well now for weeks, his problem was being covered in tack (the sticky stuff you put to hold road patches together) not sickness.
     
  2. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    First, as you already know you should not be trying to house animals from different parts of the world in the same tank. Just because both are amphibians does not mean that they require the same conditions. Second, taking an animal from the wild and putting it in with a captive animal risks the exposure to alien parasites and diseases.
    Also in most areas it is illegal to take an animal from the wild, confine it and then release it. Even for a couple of days.
    Again the issue of organisms NOT native to the area being introduced into the ecosystem. You could be introducing the amphibian version of plague into the local population.
     
  3. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    So in your opinion merlin, he should have been paved into the road? my question specifically is if there may be health risks to the animals in being housed together for a month or so until it is warm enough to release him, thats all?If there is i have multiple other tanks i can set up for a month or so i have a 20 10 and (2) 5s not in use along withe the tank hes in now and has been for the last month (not in pic). I honestly have no idea the parameters the newt should have beside clean water and eating bugs off the surface of the water, no one seems to know exactly as they arn't kept as pets (i simply recreated the out door stream area where they live wild here as close as passable). my intention was to bring him home to clean him up and release him the same day, by the time i got off the road that day it was snowing and he would have died. (My company's construction project probably knocked him out of hibernation) i had put him in this enclosure for a few mins. the ten gal he was in was being cleaned and he kept playing in the water and jumping off the spout hes sitting on just seeming to have fun, so i was wondering of the possibility of keeping him there? (he is and has been housed alone with native plants, soil from out side etc., please don't misunderstand, he just seemed happy so i was curious)
    As a construction worker i routinely try to make sure animals get relocated or saved when possible, if you know of agency's that relocate herps a few feet for construction im all ears but the ones I know of only deal with larger animals, i have checked. I live in sterling pa (that's in the pocconos), if anyone can give me info i'll certainly contact someone else in the future?
     
  4. DragonSlayer

    DragonSlayer Established Member

    I don't understand this, our county run local animal shelter regularly rescues hurt wild animals and releases back into the wild after rehab.
     
  5. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    I understand the confusion, along with loving these animals my husband and I own sekula environmental services. We deal with water. We build water and waste water systems and supervise reconstruction and preservation of wetlands and streams in construction. (Just for my background)
    People who do this have certain licenses and permits and the process is supposed to be monitored although in my experience this area is lacking in that aspect. The problem I see locally Is that small non endangered animals slip through most of this work (such as this guy above) legally moving and replacing him is questionable, the problem is that in the area I live these animals exist in hundreds and many young children keep them for a day or two and release them or kill them trying to keep them as pets. Will they be fined? Probally not it's too big of a task for what it's worth. When I have a site to supervise I will call whoever I can to aid in this process or instruct workers on how to save the original environment to be rebuilt and replace the animal in the same day with out removing them from the auctually site. (This is a kind of loop hole I've used to bag snake nests or such near a job and just replace them a hour or two later once the work moved) this still has to be done professionally but is easier than full capture and relocation. The porblem I ran into with this guy was that we did not have non chlorinated water on site. My goal was to take him wash him and release (the site is 5min from my house) it just didn't happen due to the snow :-(
     
  6. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    No you could have just moved him to a new location out of the way.
    The answer to both questions is YES!
    Animals evolve being exposed to certain pathogens that occur in a specific environment. As such they develop immunities to those specific pathogens. By bringing a new set of pathogens from another part of the world, the existing population has never been exposed to these pathogens and as such have no immunity. This can wipe out the existing population.
    Think Influenza that was brought to the natives of South America. Whole tribes were wiped out.
    And not all these pathogens will require physical contact. Some of them are airborne
    And most likely has a licensed veterinarian that supervises this.
     
  7. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    So captive animals still carry pathogens from the natural environment they have never been in? I'm not trying to argue or be a jerk I really just don't understand this.
    (Completely hypothetically) if I had two frogs from different areas that were not territorial and vary social that had the exact Same living requirments and were both captive breed. They could kill each other with pathogens from their enviroment they have never been to?
     
  8. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    And to Merlin, moving him wouldn't have helped as he was covered in tack as I stated in origial post he had to be cleaned first. He was a wiggling black gooy pile of chemicals, humans arnt supposed to come in contact with the stuff I'm pretty sure his skin is more sensitive.
     
  9. M00nbeam

    M00nbeam Member

    He is back in his normal enclosure with all natural plants from his natural enviroment, he has been housed alone. Should I just keep him captive? I really don't want to do that though?
     
  10. ExoJoe

    ExoJoe Established Member

    Congratulations on your new frogs. I think what Merlin was trying to express (I think) was that different viruses, parasites etc.. thrive in different regions. Animals from said regions may have evolved to better combat or deal with said intruders where as a species from another locale could be affected by it more. (i.e frogs to newt or newt to frogs). Laws and morals often conflict but no matter you decision keep them separated a good deal. Amphibians are very prone to contract things due to the respiratory system.
    I wish you and your frogs the best.
     

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