This Disappears When Logged In

My Rosy Boa Become Very Lethargic

Discussion in 'Rosy Boas & Sand Boas' started by Hubert, May 25, 2014.

  1. Hubert

    Hubert New Member

    I am getting very worried as my Rosy the Geralt become very lazy and lethargic. He was always mo ing a lot around viv and had very aggressive feeding response. For past 2 weeks he moving around just a little bit and when I feed him, he doesn't strike the prey, I just put fluff inside the box and after ouple minutes he will start eating and that also take him longer than usal.
    I have for ove a year now he 2 years old I keep him on aspen shavings, humidity in the tank is between 50 and 60 but it was like that last summer and it did not affect him plus he stays at the cool end of vivarium for like 80% of his time. Oh! Also couple of his scales look like they are dry or collapsed :(
    Any input would be greatly appreciated as I am getting worried

    Hubert
     
  2. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    What are the temperatures in the enclosure and what are you measuring them (and the humidity) with? The humidity is a bit too high for a rosy boa, and just because it didn't affect him last year doesn't mean it's good for him in the long run. 50% or lower would be best. From what I know, Aspen tends to hold moisture, so you may want to try something different, maybe paper towels or something less absorbent. Also, how often do you provide drinking water for the snake? Does he poop regularly? Are there any more worrying symptoms except the lethargy? 'Dry and collapsed' scales can be nothing more than leftover bits of shed that he snagged off against something. Could you maybe post a picture of him? It's really hard to tell what (if anything) is wrong without some more info. The fact that he's eating is a good sign, though.
     
  3. Hubert

    Hubert New Member

    Temperatures are bit lower than they should be but he stays in colder bit in a vivarium. Aspen I put in only last week, I kept him on rushed nut shells bedding.I also give him water once a week. When it comes to humidity, how would you lower it to 40 or less? He poops no problem.

    Just a quick update it took him 30 mins to eat mouse today. He was just moving around it back and forth, sniffing it and he start eating eat like real slow.

    And some pics
     

    Attached Files:

  4. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    What do you mean by the temperatures being 'a bit lower' than they should be (if you could give us the exact values that would be great)? Are you using a digital thermometre/hygrometer or an analogue one? It makes a huge difference. The only thing I can think of is that the low temps + too high humidity are causing him to slow down a bit, especially as he sounds healthy otherwise. When was the last time he shed? If this behaviour has only been going on for about 2 weeks, then it's possible that he's simply undergoing a rather extended period of shedding his skin, they usually change their behaviour during that time. I really don't know what could be wrong, maybe someone else will come along with more experience...it could be anything from shedding, improper husbandry to more serious health issues. Maybe wait a few more days and watch him closely, and if this behaviour doesn't stop, then you may want to consult a reptile vet, at least for an evaluation.
     
  5. Hubert

    Hubert New Member

    I am using analogue one, hygrometer and thermometer. I will try to handle him in 2 days. Thats another thing, I just haven't got enough time to handle him regularly.
    Thanks for your input I really appreciate it.
     
  6. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    Analogue thermometres/hygrometres are very inaccurate. It's quite possible that the real temperatures/humidity inside the enclosure are actually very different from what these instruments are showing. If I were you, I'd get a digital one, they're really not that expensive and are way more accurate than analogue ones. You need to know the exact parametres at all times. The health and wellbeing of your snake depends on the conditions you provide it with, and you know - better safe than sorry. Your snake is basically displaying 'red flag' behaviour, so you have to evaluate the conditions in his viv ASAP. That being said, I wish you all the best and I hope a vet visit won't be necessary. Do invest in digital instruments, though - you won't regret it. I paid about 15 dollars for mine and I'm really happy with it.
     
  7. Hubert

    Hubert New Member

    Thanks al lot MorganLeFay! I am getting paid tomorrow and its gonna be first thing I buy! One more thing how do I increase temperature and decrease humidity in his viv? Any ideas? Thanks again!
     
  8. MorganLeFay

    MorganLeFay Elite Member

    It depends on the kind of heating equipment you're using. Do you have a thermostat? If you do, you just have to set it to a higher temperature, and that's it:) If you don't have a thermostat, you can maybe get a heat bulb or a ceramic heat emiter and put it at one end of the enclosure, so that it can create a nice basking spot of about 90 F. However, you need to make sure that the snake can't burn himself against the bulb (it should be minimum 30cm above the snake at all times) and the wattage is appropriate for your enclosure (i.e. not too strong and not too weak). Heat bulbs tend to dry the air out, so you'll solve 2 problems at once:) You can also get (if you don't have it yet) an undertank heater that you'll put on the same side as the lamp. Make sure that the temperature in the basking area (hot spot) is about 90 degrees, and the cool end stays in the lower 80s, and everything should be fine. I don't know the size/layout of your enclosure (does it have a screen top?) or the equipment you already have, so it's difficult to recommend anything specific. When you increase the temperature, the humidity is likely to drop on its own. Don't spray the enclosure, and offer water not more often than once a week. When you do, keep the water bowl in the enclosure for 24h and then remove it.
     

Share This Page