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My Ball Was Bitten!

Discussion in 'Ball Pythons' started by plisskin, Jan 13, 2009.

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  1. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    Does anyone know what I can put on a mouse bite? It doesn't look deep but I worry about infection! Should I take him to the vet for a surface bite, or can I do something myself? Mouse bit him while he was coiled around it! There was some blood on the wound! Have always been afraid of this, and will now definitely try pre-killed next feeding time!
     
  2. kenman1963

    kenman1963 Moderator

    If it is not deep and the bleeding has stopped just clean and disinfect it, make sure is stays clean. I'm glad to see you are switching to pre-killed. Best of luck
     
  3. Joy81

    Joy81 Elite Member

    If it's not too deep it should be ok. Swab it with some iodine and dab on a little triple antibiotic ointment. Be sure to clean it every day, and watch for redness and swelling, these can be indicators of infection. Good luck :)
     
  4. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Forget the Iodine and just go with a little triple antibiotic salve like Neosporin.
     
  5. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    Thanks! I was wondering about the iodine, it's 47% alcohol and I thought that would cause some burning! Also should I try to treat him since he just fed last night! (worry of regurgitation)
     
  6. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    You shouldn't have to handle him, just move him enough to put a little dab of salve on the spot. It should not be a problem.

    And with regard to the iodine yes it will sting! And he WON"T be happy about it.
     
  7. Joy81

    Joy81 Elite Member

    Sorry didn't think about the sting, we used to use Iodine on our rats. They never seemed to mind too much.
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    LOL! Tough rats!
    I remember getting that stuff put on me as a kid...OWWWW!
     
  9. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    Thanks to everyone who replied! I applied a little Neosporin to the wound and he didn't mind at all. My vet also returned my message about the incident and said she was going to recommend the same. She also informed me to keep a close eye on him since it is very difficult to really tell if the wound is deep or not. If infection signs occur he would need to be given some oral antibiotics.(any tricks to start on pre-killed or frozen?)
     
  10. wgnelson

    wgnelson Elite Member

    I'm with you Merlin! Your parents also said to "stop whimpering, it's good for you. If it doesn't hurt, it's not killing the germs":(
     
  11. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Get yourself a pair of long tongs and holding the mouse just sort of wiggle it in front of the snake.
     
  12. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    I'm aware of this technique,but what about him striking the tongs and injuring his teeth! I always wondered about that being this is the most common way I've seen snakes fed!
     
  13. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    You want to make sure that the target (mouse) is warmed. They zero in on heat. That is the purpose of the little openings in the lips. They are heat sensors.
    That's also why it is suggested to NOT hold the prey in your hand. The warmth of your hand can become the target. And if you hold the back of the mouse and present the head to the snake it lessens the chance even more.
     
  14. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    Now I'm kinda worried! I just recently was told if I don't thaw out frozen mice correctly, it could poison and even Kill my BP! I would hate to do more damage than good when I'm trying to keep him from harm! Any info appreciated!
     
  15. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Whoever told you that is mistaken. There IS a concern if the mouse isn't completely thawed, but you can tell that by touch.
    If its cold the snake probably wouldn't take it anyway.
     
  16. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    I didn't think that was true,(came from pet store worker). Do you use f/t? if so what method? Thanks!
     
  17. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I feed every snake I have on F/T, corns to a 6 ft boa. I use a pair of 12 inch hemistats. You REALLY don't want to be holding that rat in your hand when the boa hits it.:eek:
    I just take a plate and put the feeders on it and let them come to room temperature. Most of my snakes will take it at room temperature but the BPs like it a bit warmer so I put theirs under the heat emitter for 5-10 minutes.
     
  18. plisskin

    plisskin Active Member

    How long do you usually have to let them thaw? I know size will be different,but approx., What type of heat emitter? I really appreciate the info! I've always heard that BP's can be bad feeders and even worse to switch over to pre-killed! I'm just trying to do whats best and you hear or read so many different things! Many Thanks!
     
  19. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    As you said the time is going to depend on how big the feeder is and how warm the ambient temperature in the room is. A pinky or hopper will generally thaw in about an hour while a large rat will take most of the day. At times I do cheat and put the plate on the roof of my iguana enclosure, right over where the heat emitter sits so it warms a bit faster.
    You can speed up the process if necessary(not everyone wants a dead rodent laying around to look at) by putting the food in a baggie and putting it in hot water out of the tap. Of course this will sometimes lead to bleeding out the nose but it is irrelevant to the snake. With the number of feeders I have to use it would be a BIG baggie!

    Oh the heat emitter is the same one that is on the BP enclosure. That one is a 150 watt TRex.
    And my BPs were converted over when they were very young. First time I saw one of them bitten,... that was it!:mad:
     
  20. BlackJack

    BlackJack Subscribed User Premium Member

    We heat up our frozen mice and rats in warm water. Two hours is usually enough for a 100 g rat. We change the water about 2-3 times and refill it with warmer water as the rats thaw.
    Then, just before feeding we put them in very hot tap water (not boiling or they can burst). Then take them with the long metal tongs by the hips and offer them to the snakes. You don't have to dry them off completely, a bit of extra moisture helps with digestion.
    My BP can be very picky, so sometimes I heat his up a bit more with a hairdryer.
    I usually put him in the feeding tub when the rat is almost ready, then I put the pan of hot water with the rat next to the feeding container and leave it a while in the dark. (To get him in the mood.) Then I heat up the rat with the hairdryer -- the heat and smell usually has my BP in the mood to eat. When I open the container, he usually snaps it right up. You can try wiggling it in front of him a bit if he doesn't take it immediately.
    Generally though, if he doesn't take it, you can leave it with him for a while (no danger of getting bit.) But sometimes the snake just won't take it. Throw it out and wait a week or 10 days and try again. Your snake will NOT starve!
    When he's good and hungry, he will eventually take an F/T mouse...just as long as it's warm enough. You can buy a laser temp gun and check the body temp 100F is usually good for feeding. Be patient and do not give up and go back to live!
    I hope that helps.
     
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