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Mouse Bite= HELP!

Discussion in 'Common/Red Tail Boa' started by briana1399, Jan 20, 2009.

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  1. briana1399

    briana1399 Elite Member

    I feed my red tailed boa live mice...at first I knocked them out and then decided to feed her live. Well I fed her tonight and she got bite on the top of her head by the mouse. I spoke with other snake owners and they said wash it with warm water and put neo on it so that is was I did. I was wondering would it be a good idea to take her to the vet even if they bite isn't bad? Thanks for any opinions!!! :)
     
  2. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    You're LUCKY!
    Or rather the snake is!:rolleyes:
    A bite to the head from a struggling rodent can be lethal! Thats why we stress not to feed live.
    If it's just a surface wound, a dab of neosporin will do it. Just keep a close eye on it and if you see any sign of infection get to the vet.
     
  3. briana1399

    briana1399 Elite Member

    Thanks!!
    I looked at her this morning and she looked good.
     
  4. schlegelbagel

    schlegelbagel Frog Lover Premium Member

    I'm going to suggest you try switching to frozen/thawed mice. Its MUCH safer.
     
  5. briana1399

    briana1399 Elite Member

    What do I do if she doesn't eat them? I'm sure she will but just in case.
     
  6. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Boas have a strong feeding response. She will take it. And lets face it. With a boa you aren't going to be feeding it mice for long but RATS!
    Big ones!
    At the very least you should kill the prey before giving it to the snake.
    Next time you may not be so lucky.
     
  7. briana1399

    briana1399 Elite Member

    Thanks for all your help. I will definitely start using frozen and if not I will go back to knocking out the prey first. Do you know a good way to tell how old she is? I took a guess by her size and I'd say in July she will be one.
     
  8. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    There is no way of telling age by size.
    Different care willl have different growth rates as will genetic factors.
     
  9. 1melissa3

    1melissa3 Elite Member

    Just don't forget to "jiggle" the dead rodent in front of the boa, whereas they have a strong feeding response, something dead and lying there will not entice some of the picky ones. . . USE TONGS to dangle and jiggle, not your fingers. ;)
     
  10. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    1melissa3, no offense- but the post is 2 months old. I'm guessing she has already figured something out.
     
  11. 1melissa3

    1melissa3 Elite Member

    I saw that afterward:) I said I was new, right?? :)
     
  12. missabrat

    missabrat Elite Member

    LOL 1melissa3 welcome !!
     
  13. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Hey, didn't mean to step on your toes. I was only trying to help out as I am sure you were. Sorry if I upset you.
     
  14. 1melissa3

    1melissa3 Elite Member

    You didn't at all:) I was laughing at myself. . .
     
  15. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Good to know! I laugh at myself often enough and if I don't my wife does it for me.

    How long have you been keeping snakes?
     
  16. 1melissa3

    1melissa3 Elite Member

    Well, just got the rtb about two weeks ago, but we've held him from the first night on, except, of course, when we fed him for a couple of days. The balls we've had for about two/three months. We haven't held them, but we are always in and out of their "homes". I have only read up on everything I can, I don't know anything yet from experience of my own. :) I do know that I have come to love the work of it so far!
     
  17. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    I know, I have been keeping snakes for about three years now and I can't imagine not ever having a snake anymore. They definitely get under your skin. I started out with 1, then 2, then 6 and so on until I now own 17 and am always looking for the next one.
     
  18. 1melissa3

    1melissa3 Elite Member

    My husband started this thing with the snakes, but he works and I am the one that is home in the day time, so I do all I can for him. I do make sure to consistantly show them attention because I worry about them not being friendly enough, but sometimes because our kids have been home sick so much, I purposefully don't bother with them other than look in on them. My boys are excited, and my twins, especially, want to hurry and grab for them, and that was the only time my rtb struck at me was when one grabbed for him and I was the one in the middle. After that, I don't think my husband will be taking them out on his own, which is ironic, but at the same time, that only made me more determined to know them better and make things right with and for them.
     
  19. David McConley

    David McConley Elite Member

    Having a snake strike at you can be a very intimidating thing and not to be taken lightly. I remember when I got my first bite, afterwards my hands were shaking like crazy. The thing to remember is that MOST snakes will calm down once they realize you are not going to eat them for dinner. I handle my snakes about every 3-4 days and they are just great with that. Of course when I only had one or two I would handle them all of the time. Having a child or children can also determine the frequency of your handling. My 2 year old son is into everything and the only time I have for the snakes is after he goes to bed. I also have to work in some time for my wife and the furry family members. It takes a bit of juggling but it can be done.
     
  20. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    I remember my first bite, from my young boa - I had him out, and he had been quite calm, crawling around my shoulders, and up onto my bun (I have long hair, often kept wound up in a tidy bun - and the snakes all love wrapping around it and just sitting there) he had started exploring, and slithered over top of my head, and was checking out my ears and nose, and then, completely at random, bit my nose. My first response was verbal "That was uncalled for!" and he was not acting stressed or irritated in the least when i picked him up. No hissing, no strike pose, just a very innocent looking young boa with big eyes. I laughed, and he never bit me again after that. I still do not know what could have warranted it - I hadn't been moving very much, watching TV I think, I had not reached for him, or done anything I believe would startle him.

    I have been nipped a few times since, by other additions, and the worst thing about it is the speed - so startling. We have 6 assorted pythons and boas, and the most intimidating snake we own is a 30 inch milk snake! He lunges at everything once he catches the scent of a mouse, even at the cats, through the glass walls of his terrarium. Ferocious man-eater!
     
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