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More "Giant" Snakes Found in Florida.

Discussion in 'Herp Awareness' started by Merlin, Jan 20, 2010.

  1. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

  2. Orca

    Orca Elite Member

    Great, more fuel for the snakes are evil monsters fire. And do they really think the two species could hybridize and have viable offspring? Sounds absurd to me.
     
  3. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    I would doubt it in the wild as well although they have hybridized other python species in captivity.
     
  4. TheRoachRanch

    TheRoachRanch Elite Member

    I love how they tuck this in "There have been cases of the snakes killing children." That's all you have to do in this country to get support, just add kids! I personally would have wrote the article so it was a little more unsettling. "New Python species hates your kids and wants to eat them... alive!!!!" OR the Geraldo version. "A new super predator has been discovered here in Florida..... SNAKES!"

    All I hope for is that we in the reptile industry & hobby can continue to educate as many people as we can on a daily basis. I would tend to lean on it being our responsibility. No one else is going to do it for us. People need to know that this kind of article is a biased piece of c r a p aimed to scare them. We need to fill people w/ knowledge starting w/ our greatest resource and future conservationists, our kids!

    To tell you the truth, what I'm concerned about is the snakes eating the Alligators. The gators reign supreme in the glades and we can't have them go missing. They are an important national treasure, not to mention an important part of a balanced S. Florida ecosystem.

    -Ian
     
  5. Dragoness

    Dragoness Elite Member

    and alligators might hybridize with eagles, then we'd have flying toothy monsters to carry off the children. seriously, who writes this ****??? There is no evidence to say it even could happen... this belongs in the national enquirer with the cats from mars.

    And the glades DO have predators that eat snakes - just because the snakes are out of their home range does not mean nothing will mess with them. I'm not saying it's enough, but there are similar animals, fulfilling similar niches as the snake would encounter in it's home range. All snakes start out small, and small snakes can get picked off by any number of raptors, raccoons, opossums, bears, gators, canines, felines, etc. Not a single one of those creatures is going to analyze the snake, and say to itself "gee, that doesn't look like the corn snake I ate last week, guess I should leave it alone." Large individuals might be the sole domain of bears (occasionally) and gators, and it might be a tie, but they have a lot of growing to do to outgrow the rest of the native predators.

    As for the rest, there are records of alligators killing/maiming/attacking/eating people of all sizes, not just children.

    ugh! they are making this problem much bigger than it really is. Kind of like H1N1. Create panic and hysteria, just because you can, and it sells your paper!
     
  6. Orca

    Orca Elite Member

    But were the pythons from the same geographic region? Because one of these snakes is from Africa and the other Asia (if I remember correctly) and, over enough evolutionary time, can make their chromosomes incompatible. Conservationist are even having trouble cross breeding the two subspecies of orangutans for more genetic diversity - they are from different islands and now have slightly differing DNA.

    I got my first customer the other day asking about this. She was talking about the ball python we had that was about 2' long and asked what you did if you had children in the house. "Wouldn't it go after them once it was larger?" I had to bite my tongue from reacting sarcastically.
     
  7. Merlin

    Merlin Administrator Staff Member Premium Member

    Burmese and Rocks have already been hybridized in captivity. They call them "Cateaters":rolleyes:
    High End Herps - Hybrid Cateaters
    However the resulting hybrids to this point do not seem to even reach the size of either of the parent species let alone turn into super monster snakes!
     

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