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Mold on My Wood ALREADY?!

Discussion in 'Cage Furniture - Accessories' started by guadalakara, Jan 2, 2013.

  1. guadalakara

    guadalakara Member

    A couple weeks ago I got a secondhand enclosure for my new green iguana, which came with a magnificent centerpiece of a large branch of some kind of wood:
    image.jpg

    Yesterday I noticed mold starting to grow on patches of the wood ALREADY! And I haven't even piped in a humidifier yet! Just been misting ~3x day, humidity stays around 20% with brief spikes to around 70 right after a misting. image.jpg

    I'm surprised at how bad it is already - especially because when I got it there was no visible mold, plus I know it had been used for some time before when the enclosure previously housed a snake. Since there was no problem when it belonged to a snake, I didn't expect such an immediate problem with my iguana (although maybe the previous owners just never misted for their snake?).

    At first I thought the wood was mopani, but now I suspect it may be grape wood. Is there anything I can do, or should I just give up now on this piece of wood since its already so bad and I only plan on making the enclosure MORE humid?

    Is it very dangerous for my iguana to be in there with the mold right now or will she be alright for awhile? I can't afford to replace the branch immediately and there are no other decorations or anything for her to climb on right now so I'm hesitant to take it out but of course I don't want her to get sick.

    Btw the enclosure is glass and I think melamine, with 4 three-inch circular vents drilled across the back panel for ventilation. I appreciate your help!
     
  2. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    I would take the branch out, scrub with a weak bleach solution, rinse really well, then dry it with a hair dryer or heat gun. This should kill of the spores and buy some time.
    I polyurethaned the branches in my CWD cage to prevent mold but now my CWD can't grin the wood so I had to wrap them in vines.
     
  3. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi, that`s a great looking branch, I`d be upset if I couldn`t use it any more too! Here are a few remedies (though it`s about mold on furniture, the remedy would be the same because it`s just bare wood).

    How to Treat Mold on Wood
    Molds can be found virtually anywhere and everywhere. They irritate with their perpetual presence indoors and outdoors. So how to treat mold on wood? Read this article to have a mold free life!
    For all those who have an idea about what molds are and what they propose to do in the house with your carpentry; this article would serve to be the savior. The following sections can serve to be a navigation stem to the other sections of the article, that explicate the treatment methods, on how to treat mold on wood. We begin with what molds are and how to identify, that molds have hijacked your space.

    Q: What Are Molds?

    A: Molds are tiny, molecular organisms that are found virtually anywhere. Foods, plants or even dry leaves, are the primary and predominant victims of molds. They are microscopic organisms, colloquially called fungus, that commute through air. You can identify them, when you behold the eerie sight of a surface, skipping colors from white to green to orange, brown, green or black. The surface endures a discolored appeal, especially when they have affected the area in specificity and drastically. Touching molds can cause allergic reactions that bear resemblance to reaction that are borne, when an individual develops itches through pollen grass.

    Q: Are Molds Dangerous?

    A: Molds or mildew is dangerous, if the area that they cover and plan to corrode is extensive in nature. Killing mold on wood is the only solution. In no case should our tactile sense be tempted to touch it as this may lead us to have an allergic reaction. One could counter a sneezing attack or feel itchy all over the body. They could spell disaster for the structure of the building. When wood is dried thoroughly, mold formation cannot be the result. If the wood retains the moisture in any way, mold attacking the surface is evident. The wood warps and corrodes from within.

    Q: Who Sets the Breeding Ground for Mold?

    A: Well, the answer is simple and elementary; it is 'Moisture'. Moisture can prove to be the hormone that sets a stage for it to perform and create destruction for the surface. Wood, paper and dried leaves set grounds on which molds find refuge.

    Q: Who Is at a Greater Risk with Moldy Existence?

    A: Infants and toddlers who are prone to experimenting and who want to learn everything through touch, the elderly, and all those who have a low immunity are at a greater risk of countering health hazards through the existence of molds.

    Q: How to Identify Mold Attack?

    A: Here are some signs that signify that your surroundings have compromised on molds.
    Musty odor
    Damp surroundings
    Fungus-like cotton-y appearance
    Discoloration of the affected area
    Plaster peeling off
    Wood warping
    Q: How Do You Treat Molds?

    A: Here is a procedural paradigm on how to get rid of mold on wood. To begin with, given below are common steps that you must preferably follow, before you choose to use any of the mold killing agents.

    Step #1. Equip yourself with a sponge and detergent added to water.
    Step #2. Clean the mildew affected area with a sponge dipped in soapy water.
    Step #3. Get rid of the soapy water from the area and allow it to dry completely. You may now use one of the methods given below to treat mold on wood.

    Effective Mold Killing Agents

    ... With BleachWith bleach mixed in water, you could fill the concoction in a spray bottle. You could spray it in the affected area. This will remove the mildew on the surface, be it wood or any surface of the house.
    Let the area dry out completely.
    You could wash the mildew affected area all over again with soapy water to ensure there is no mildew left on the surface.
    ... With White VinegarIf your efforts are not answered positively, you may use white vinegar.
    Add a portion of vinegar to 4 portions of water and spray the concocted solution on the affected areas.
    Let the contents react on the surface for an hour or two. Scrub clean the place with sponge dipped in water.
    ... With AlternifoliaAlternifolia, colloquially known as tea tree oil, has proved to be a bet, worth considering.
    Add 3 portions of tea tree oil in water maintaining an equal proportion.
    Apply the solution on the mold-y areas with a thick cloth (one that may help in scrubbing the wall) and leave it on, to dry all by itself. Rinsing with soap water after terminating the application procedure is not required
    ... With Hydrogen PeroxideHydrogen peroxide is an effective agent in killing mold camps. Add a few drops of hydrogen peroxide in water
    Fill the solution in a spray bottle and sprinkle the same on the targeted space.
    Allow it to settle and react for 10 to 15 minutes.
    Scrub the surface with soapy water
    Choice of Scrubbers

    Steel Wool
    For the procedures explicated, you may resort to using steel wool with the solutions. Steel wool will help you complete the procedure by scrubbing the surface thoroughly along with soapy water again.

    Sandpaper
    You may also use sandpaper for a final showdown, if steel wool is unable to prove its potency. Remove the mold as far as possible, however don't be harsh on the surface.
     
  4. guadalakara

    guadalakara Member

    thanks guys! can anyone tell me if this is, in fact, grapewood?

    do you think if i clean it thoroughly with bleach or vinegar it'll be banished forever? i'm worried that since it's THIS bad after just one week it will keep coming back with a vengeance no matter how many times i scrub. maybe polyurethane is the way to go... any tips on what kind to use and how to apply?
     
  5. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Its probably grapewood as that is the more popular kind but I am not an expert so dont take my word for it.
    Bleach will kill the mold better than vinegar, but it wont make the wood mold proof, it could still grow in other spots or even grow in these spots again.
    If your going to polyurethane it 2 coats should do it and if you splurge on the quick drying water based kind You should have it cured and ready for use within a day or so. Just bare in mind it can make it difficult for your iguana to climb the branch.
     
  6. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    I would use 2 coats of water based polyurethane varnish, apply with a normal paintbrush, I doubt the Iguana would have any problems climbing afterwards, though of course it will need to be done every so often. Two coats should be dry and ready to use in 24 hours.
     
  7. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    QUOTE=Thalatte;450313]Its probably grapewood as that is the more popular kind but I am not an expert so dont take my word for it.
    Bleach will kill the mold better than vinegar, but it wont make the wood mold proof, it could still grow in other spots or even grow in these spots again.
    If your going to polyurethane it 2 coats should do it and if you splurge on the quick drying water based kind You should have it cured and ready for use within a day or so. Just bare in mind it can make it difficult for your iguana to climb the branch.[/QUOTE]

    You type too fast for me!! ;)
     
  8. Thalatte

    Thalatte Elite Member

    Finally I beat out Murrindindi(with accurate info! Bonus!)!!!! Yay!!!

    One coat of oil based poly on my cwds branches did make it hard for him to grip as his claws couldn't dig in. Of course his branches are smoother than the grapewood and his claws smaller...just be prepared in case you do have to wrap it in something.
     

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