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Mist from Ultrasonic Not Dissipating.

Discussion in 'Humidity' started by SpidaFly, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    My Eastern Water Dragon's enclosure has this slapped-together humidifier:
    img2029r.jpg
    (Yeah... maybe I should have used white/transparent aquarium silicon. Sigh. Anyway...)

    And the enclosure (though I imagine you've seen me posting pictures of it before, but I'll post here for thoroughness):
    img1893dp.jpg
    (Note that's a pretty old picture of the reptarium. Imagine the humidifier pipe sticking through the LEFT wall, about halfway up, and sticking several inches in so that condensation drips into the water rather than all over the stick on the left. The humidifier ejects its mist over the "pond" side (which also happens to be the cool side) of the EWD's 6' long enclosure. The humidifier is hooked up to a hygrometer.

    The trouble that I'm having is that the mist isn't dissipating. Because it's so dry where I live, it runs quite frequently. Now, if I aim a 50W zoomed basking spot light across the enclosure from right to left, the mist does dissipate. However, that is making the enclosure just a tad too hot. If I remove that light entirely, or replace it with a lower watt bulb, the fog hangs around the lower half of the enclosure pretty much all the time. I'm afraid that if that continues, the constant wet air will give my Dragon a RI.

    Any ideas? Thanks!
     
  2. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    Hi again, are you saying you expected/want the mist to rise towards the the top half (warm side) of the tank? If yes, directing the pipe upwards, rather than sideways, would help to do that, as would having the pool and humidifier closer to the heat source (warm side).
     
  3. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    No, not really. The problem I'm having is that when I put a lower wattage bulb in the across-enclosure fixture or remove it entirely, the fog hangs around in the enclosure pretty much permanently, and I'm afraid that the permanent fog will give my WD respiratory difficulties.
     
  4. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member

    So is the humidifier running all the time during the day (if so, why not use a timer, 10 minutes in the hour)?
     
  5. justor

    justor Elite Member

    Would adding a fan help..?
     
  6. HerpFanatic

    HerpFanatic Elite Member

    My fogger on my CWD enclosure runs for one hour and fifteen minutes. Then is is off for 45 minutes. Repeat the cycle 24/7. Seems to keep the humidity just right. Of course you will have to play with timer settings to keep your humidity around 80%. Where my settings work great for me it depends how dry or moist your house is.
     
  7. murrindindi

    murrindindi Elite Member


    Hi, this is an Australian Water dragon, slightly different conditions, they don`t need such a high humidity.
     
  8. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    So do you think running on a timer would be BETTER than running on my hygrostat?
     
  9. HerpFanatic

    HerpFanatic Elite Member

    I read it as Asian water dragon, Sorry. So everything else is still the same just run your fogger less time on the timer. Just do not pay attention to the 80% humidity. ;)
     
  10. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    So do you think running on a timer would be BETTER than running on my hygrostat?
     
  11. AjaMichelle

    AjaMichelle Elite Member

    This may be a dumb question, but can you dial down the intensity of the fogger? I make my own foggers from store-bought ultra sonic humidifiers and they come with a dial. There isn't just one setting for the fog.
     
  12. HerpFanatic

    HerpFanatic Elite Member

    The hydrostat would be better then any timer.
     
  13. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    Yeah, I have it dialed all the way down. Won't go any farther down unless it was off entirely.

    Well that's what I thought too, but... then again the fog won't dissipate unless I have that 50W basking bulb at the upper right shining across the enclosure to the pool. Granted it does make a pretty nice gradient... but it's just a few degrees on the hot side in my opinion.
     
  14. HerpFanatic

    HerpFanatic Elite Member

    Can you put a dimmer switch on the bulb so you can turn it down just a little so at maybe 40w of power? This should lower the temps. I put a dimmer switch on a outlet and plug in my lights and heat pad to control the temps. You can check my pictures here: http://www.herpcenter.com/members/17494-albums1367.html It shows the steps of me making my Rheostat. I am going to write a article for it when I get a chance.
     
  15. SpidaFly

    SpidaFly Elite Member

    Hmm, yeah. Actually today I was wiring a rheostat into my new flexwatt today and had just that exact same idea. It'll take some doing though, simply because the fixtures I'm using are outdoor ceramic/metal fixtures with the splicing inside the fixture itself, and I've got two lights on the same line, and the wires running through a nice plastic tube to the exterior of the enclosure. I'll have to split all of it open and rewire everything and probably screw the rheostat into the top of the inside of the enclosure. (So basically, if I just plugged my existing plug straight into a rheostat, it would dim the basking spot too... and the basking spot ranges from 95 to 103 throughout the day, which is just perfect for an Eastern WD... so rewiring will be necessary).
     
  16. rudyolph

    rudyolph Member

    That is interesting...I've never heard of that issue. If your hygrostat is telling your humidifier to constantly run yet you have a layer of mist(100% humidity) sitting on the bottom of your tank all the time something is not right.
    First silly question...is your hygrostat inside your tank so that it is checking the humidity level of the tank versus the room?
    If it is in the tank then given this situation so you aren't messing around with your lights etc is to add a small fan to help churn your air a bit because it sounds like you have dead air in the tank and the humidity levels aren't balanced. If the mist just sits at the bottom at 100% humidity but the top of your tank (presumably) where your hygrostat is then the fan would balance out the humidity in the tank. You can buy a small computer fan cut a hole on the right side of the thank at the bottom and then hook it up there. It won't cause a wind storm in the tank but it will move the air enough to balance things out.
     

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